Meet Lucy McHale, the Rosa Parks of Rosa Parks Middle School

By Austin Ruse Published on August 7, 2018

Lucy McHale, now 14, worked at the snack bar at the local pool in Olney, Maryland. One day a boy from her school leaned over the counter and told one of Lucy’s co-workers to kiss him. In today’s #MeToo environment this would be a clear violation, except the person he wanted to kiss was another boy. Because the boy demanding a kiss was supposedly gay, and because Lucy stepped in to defend her co-worker, she became the devil in the story, and the target of harassment at Rosa Parks Middle School.

Sometime later, Lucy was sitting with two of her best girlfriends at a local coffee shop, when all of a sudden, the two friends began kissing. Lucy says, “We are kind of like sisters. They were kissing on the lips. I didn’t know what to do. I told them it’s kind of disgusting and they did it again.” One of her friends announced to Lucy that she was a lesbian. Their friendship ended.

Lucy comes from a large family of faithful Catholics and was already something of a target for bullying at her school. She liked to wear her favorite shirt that says, “Women of the Womb Unite.” One boy asked her, “How are you not the most hated person in school?” She tells me, “If someone can wear an LGBT shirt, and they do, why can’t I wear my pro-life shirt?” But, Lucy found out that tolerance works only one way, that there is a favored group and she’s not in it.

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Things came to a head for Lucy this Spring when the Montgomery County School Board mandated that the schools celebrate “Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Pride” during June. Her school’s answer to this order was enthusiastic, to say the least. It included a massive display case with pictures of “heroes” as Ellen DeGeneres, Jazz Jennings, Caitlyn Jenner, Rachel Maddow and others.

Rosa Parks Middle School Pride Month Heroes - 900

 

In addition, the case featured several books they want the kids to read.

Kissing Kate by Lauren Myracle is about Kate and her best friend Lissa who have “shared everything for four years. Then one night at a drunken party, Kate leaned in to kiss Lissa, and Lissa kissed her back. And now Kate is pretending Lissa doesn’t exist. Confused and alone, Lissa’s left questioning everything she thought she knew about herself, and about life. But with the help of a free-spirit new friend, Lissa’s beginning to find the strength to realize that sometimes falling in love with the wrong person is the only way to find your footing.”

Ami Polonsky’s Gracefully Grayson tells the story of Grayson Sender who “has been holding onto a secret for what seems like forever: ‘he’ is a girl on the inside, stuck in the wrong gender’s body. The weight of this secret is crushing, but sharing it would mean facing ridicule, scorn, rejection or worse. Despite the risks, Grayson’s true self itches to break free. Will new strength from an unexpected friendship and a caring teacher’s wisdom be enough to help Grayson step into the spotlight she was born to inhabit?”

With such propaganda from authority figures even in middle school, there is little wonder that boys, who are too young to know who they are, now feel emboldened to demand kisses from other boys, or that girls are confused enough to begin kissing other girls in public places.

Lucy McHale met with her principal and asked if they could have a display case about the issue of abortion or of traditional marriage. The principal said the “Pride” display case was mandated by the board of education. Lucy saw this as the dodge that it was. The order from the board did not say they needed to put up a display case, only recognize “Pride” month. It could have been practically anything, but the principal decided to put up the gaudy rainbow display case promoting lesbianism, homosexuality and transgenderism.

The principal said they needed to make everyone feel included. Lucy said to her, “But I don’t feel included.” Lucy’s inclusion, of course, was entirely beside the point. Or perhaps it was quite the point, because certain viewpoints, Christian viewpoints, are the enemy of the new zeitgeist.

Rosa Parks Middle School Full Pride Month Display Case - 900

 

I interviewed Lucy for an hour this summer and found a charming, intelligent, engaging and fearless girl that any school would be happy to have. I also met her brother, Vincent, a hyper-articulate 12-year-old who has already delivered a paper at Rosa Parks laying out the lies of “gender identity.”

With such propaganda from authority figures even in middle school, there is little wonder that boys, who are too young to know who they are, now feel emboldened to demand kisses from other boys, or that girls are confused enough to begin kissing other girls in public places. There are no other words to describe this other than recruitment and grooming.

It is interesting to consider who is Rosa Parks at Rosa Parks Middle School. Is it the boys who demand homosexual kisses? Is it the indoctrinated kids who bully those who object? Is it the principal who does not allow competing voices? Of course, it is none of them. It is Lucy McHale who refuses to sit in the back of the ideological bus.

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