Many hoped the nomination of a Supreme Court Justice would halt infighting and bring unity. Despite the jurist earning high praise, Judge Brett Kavanaugh has been met with resistance — and not only from the Left.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, right, walks past the press following a photo opportunity with Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 10, 2018.

By Josh Shepherd Published on July 10, 2018

In a dramatic prime time event Monday night, President Donald Trump announced appeals court judge Brett Kavanaugh as his second nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court. He follows in the footsteps of now-Justice Neil Gorsuch, a key voice on the Supreme Court since his confirmation in April 2017.

Kavanaugh clerked for retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy, then later served as a staff secretary for President George W. Bush. In 2006, he was appointed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit where he has served since. Kavanaugh has also been praised as a family man; the father of two young girls even coaches their basketball teams.

The eminently qualified jurist has nonetheless been greeted with mixed reactions. Hostility from the left was expected. Yet questions from other corners are more complex, surely to be pondered during the confirmation process ahead.

Prime-Time Announcement

Ed Whelan, President of Ethics and Public Policy Center:

Senator Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia:

Broad Coalition of Support

Some faith leaders were quick to release statements of support for Judge Brett Kavanaugh. As with the nomination of Gorsuch last year, the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC) convened pastors across the nation to sign on to a letter emphasizing the nominee’s strengths on religious liberty issues.

Help us champion truth, freedom, limited government and human dignity. Support The Stream »

Pastor Mark Burns of Harvest Praise & Worship Center (Easley, S.C.):

Ed Stetzer of Christianity Today and Wheaton College (Chicagoland, Ill.):

Tony Perkins, President of Family Research Council (Washington, D.C.):

Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC):

Some who have vocally criticized President Trump in the past expressed support of Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

Bill Kristol of The Weekly Standard:

Senator John McCain of Arizona:

Christina Sommers, scholar at American Enterprise Institute:

Erick Erickson of The Resurgent:

Critics on the Left Speak Out

Then there’s the Left. Within moments of the announcement, a scheduled rally in front of the Supreme Court was underway. Some on-site, including Fox News host Shannon Bream, say the anger expressed made them feel unsafe. Leaders on the left also offered a preview of fierce anti-Kavanaugh rhetoric to come.

Reasoned Policy Leaders Express Concerns

However, it was not only protestors and partisans who had unanswered questions about the nomination. Others on the right and left offered their own takes.

David French of National Review Institute:

Lisa Sharon Harper of Sojourners and Auburn Theological Seminary:

Robert Christian of Democrats for Life of America:

Judge Andrew Napolitano, Sr. Judicial Analyst at Fox News:

Rachel Bovard of the Conservative Partnership Institute:

Deeper Perspective and the Process Ahead

A months-long confirmation process awaits. Citizens and leaders alike will seek to understand the nominee’s record. All the while, advocacy campaigns will work to sway public opinion about Kavanaugh.

David Brooks of the New York Times:

Former Senator John Kyl has been tasked with ushering Judge Kavanaugh into private meetings with Senators of both parties during the confirmation process.

Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky:

 

Explore The Stream’s complete coverage of Politics, including the courts.

Print Friendly
Comments ()
The Stream encourages comments, whether in agreement with the article or not. However, comments that violate our commenting rules or terms of use will be removed. Any commenter who repeatedly violates these rules and terms of use will be blocked from commenting. Comments on The Stream are hosted by Disqus, with logins available through Disqus, Facebook, Twitter or G+ accounts. You must log in to comment. Please flag any comments you see breaking the rules. More detail is available here.
  • Jim Walker

    I’m not surprised with the comments made by Napolitano. He has, recently, shifted to the left side of the right.
    To all who are left, you can never be right.
    There is an extreme left but there is no such thing as an extreme right because we have our moral boundaries, whereas the left has already OB (Out of Bounds) and continued to shift away.
    David Duke and his kinsmen is not even right.

    • John Connor

      There is an extreme right just as there is an extremist left. The rights morality is no worse or better than the left. Btw. David Duke is a republican conservative.

      • Starlord616

        The big thing the judge needs to answer why he lied to congress during his first confirmation.

      • Jim Walker

        Duke can register as anything but that doesn’t define him.
        What I was drawing is that anything that is so call “extreme right” is not right at all.
        I guess no one got it.

    • Starlord616

      Yes there is a extreme right . .As someone who is on the left I have my moral boundaries . I get them from the bible because I believe that Jesus Died for our sins and rose again on the 3rd day. And I believe that he will come again . And Napolitano hasn’t changed. He is just speaking about the law. And by the way David Duke and other neo Nazis back Trump .

      • Jim Walker

        I was addressing extreme left and I’m glad you are just left centered.

        What I was drawing at, is that anything that is so call “extreme right” is not right at all and neither is “extreme left”.
        I guess no one got it.

        Duke can back anyone but that does not define who Trump is.
        Am I a drug addict if a drug addict girl confesses her love for me ?

Inspiration
Liberty McArtor
More from The Stream
Connect with Us