I’m a US Citizen Living in Honduras. Here’s What I Think About the Caravan.

By Jennifer Zilly Canales Published on November 5, 2018

I am a U.S. citizen married to a Honduran. Since we said our vows five years ago, we have parented 11 orphaned and abandoned children and teens in this third-world country in response to God’s call on our lives. Seven still live with us and call us Mom and Dad. We intentionally live without air-conditioning, television, high-speed internet and without a washing machine or dishwasher. The cinderblock home we inhabit on the outskirts of our little rural Honduran town is less than half the size of the home in which I grew up in the Texas suburbs.

I am not involved in politics but would like to present to you a new perspective in regards to the current immigration crisis based on our daily life and experiences on the northern coast of Honduras. I speak fluent Spanish and live alongside Hondurans every day in the workplace, in the local community and in the most intimate corners of my own home. Although I will never be able to change the color of my skin or re-write my cultural history, I do know and love the Honduran people and have lived in this culture my entire adult life.

Life in Honduras

As many are aware of the press covering of the current drama of the large caravans of Hondurans and other Central Americans parading north to the U.S. border, many of us here in Honduras (on the other end of the equation) are deeply troubled as this wrong mindset affects many who are in our area. I personally feel very uncomfortable about the chaos many of the uneducated immigrants will thrust upon the United States. And the way in which they have forsaken international laws and police barricades cannot be justified.

Some are indeed refugees seeking legitimate asylum. But others are simply fleeing generally difficult (but not dire) conditions, or have simply chosen what seems to be the easier route of escape. It is not impossible to forge a humble living in Honduras (over 9 million Hondurans survive in this culture every day), although it is true that much corruption, lack of opportunities and violence abound. There are very heavy “war taxes” that gangs place on local businesses, making it very difficult for many to earn an honest living. If you don’t pay the demanded rate each month, your life may be taken.

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Many dignified Hondurans work the same professional jobs as Americans and earn about a tenth of what an American earns. That was my experience as a college graduate in the first job I had in Honduras as a bilingual elementary-school teacher. I worked 8-10 hours per day, 5 days per week and earned the equivalent of $330 per month. Many Hondurans live off a similar salary (or less). That kind of budget requires almost all common luxuries to be forsaken — but one can indeed survive.

In regards to unpunished violence, my husband’s brother was shot dead point-blank two years ago and no police action was taken even after filing several reports with eye witnesses. And three years ago, my husband was kidnapped and brutally beaten by local gang lords only to confront similar apathy from the authorities once he escaped.

When cattle thieves stole and killed our two milking cows last year, I walked down the gravel road to the local police station only for the policeman to shrug and tell me that that type of crime is to be expected. No action was taken to investigate or punish the crime.

Honduran Youth

We who are on the frontlines in Honduras have offered high-quality free education and character formation in the Living Waters Ranch school we operate out of our rural homestead to over 100 at-risk Honduran youth in the past five years. More than half have walked out because they admittedly had no interest in studying or preparing for the future. This type of apathetic attitude is common among youth in our area.

They are now vagabonds in our rural neighborhood, zipping up and down gravel roads on their bikes and falling into the traps that drugs, petty crime and sexual promiscuity present. Many of them decided to go no further than a second- or sixth-grade education despite our repeated attempts to visit them in their homes, counsel their parents and encourage them to seek God with their lives.

Many of these rogue teens — whom we know and love personally — seem to have enough money to buy junk food and show off a nice cell phone, but there are supposedly no funds for the important things in life. These are oftentimes (but by no means always) the same people who wish to run off to the United States because Honduras doesn’t have any opportunities. They were given open doors and even when they were pleaded to walk through them, they decided not to.

The Caravans’ Effect

Just two weeks ago, a single father who had his three children in our school suddenly decided to withdraw them from our program and join the illegal caravan in hopes of a better future. A respected friend of ours informed us that his children appeared on the news about a week ago as now being held in the Honduran capital seven hours away from where we live, where they will now be placed in an orphanage (while Dad continues marching onward to the United States). Is this the better life he was hoping to forge for his children?

There are many opposing views on the immigration crisis, but we respectfully stand firm in our belief that laws and protocols should be respected.

To explain the situation further, several days ago my husband and two of our teen foster daughters, who were driving home around dinnertime, found the intersection of our rural neighborhood filled with close to 200 people all frantically trying to form another caravan to follow after the first. There were people screaming and trying to get more people to abandon their homes as they would gamble everything for their slice of the American Dream. My husband and teen daughters were devastated, as we know too well that many marriages are broken, children abandoned, lies believed and laws broken when people choose this route.

It’s Possible to Live an Honest Life in Honduras

There are many opposing views on the immigration crisis, but we respectfully stand firm in our belief that laws and protocols should be respected. If anyone (from any country) would desire to enter a foreign land, it should be done so with the appropriate paperwork, under specific circumstances and with a collaborative attitude.

We are working very hard on our end to inform our students and their families of the harshness of the trip through Mexico and the reality of what will most likely wait for them if they even make it across the border. Our desire is to offer opportunities — educational, employment and in Christian discipleship — right here in Honduras. To teach this generation how to live a dignified lifestyle and make productive choices here.

Honduras is in desperate need of reform. But that does not mean that the solution is for Hondurans to flee the country illegally.

I am currently teaching an intensive 5-week Geography class that the majority of our 40-plus students and teachers participate in as we seek to bust many myths about illegal immigration and convince those under our care that a peaceful, honest life before God and before men is possible right here in Honduras (even if that means forsaking many modern luxuries). Many of our teenage students have been very surprised by the information and photos presented in this class, and we are excited that many (possibly all) are being convinced to stay in Honduras rather than chase after an illusion (and an illegal illusion at that).

I paid one in-depth visit last week to a local mother who was on the brink of being swept off into another immigrant caravan, and I have on my to-do list another visit I would like to pay to a dear neighbor of ours who is likewise considering leaving amid the frenzy.

What About the Hondurans Who Stay?

Let us consider this perspective amidst much political confusion and potential anger between opposing parties: Honduras is in desperate need of reform and an effective judicial system as it is overwhelmingly true that injustice and violence reign. But that does not mean that the solution is for Hondurans to flee the country illegally.

If the United States accepts the several thousand immigrants in the caravan, there are still over 9 million Hondurans living in what those who have fled claim to be unbearable circumstances on Honduran soil. What good can be brought about by extending help to a very small percentage who present themselves as refugees unless wide-scale change will be brought about by and for the masses who have stayed behind?

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  • Craig

    Your viewpoint from Honduras is right on. The situation is very similar to that of Guatemala where I have worked and lived for 16 years.
    The media never showcases the broken families that are left behind when one or both parents “chase the dream”.
    Yes, Guatemala has poverty, corruption, gangs, etc, but it is possible to earn a good living and have a good life for anyone who wants it.
    Don’t believe everything that is on the news media. There is an agenda that is being promoted at all costs.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Craig: Thank you for reading the article and for your constructive comments. God bless you in your daily work in Guatemala.

  • tz1

    Note that those who might have been able to help change and fix Honduras are leaving. Lets say every Doctor left Honduras, would it be better off?

    You don’t ask why. I think it is because you won’t like the answer. Why didn’t you have security? Do you own a gun or a rifle so if you saw the cattle rustlers, you could take action? If things are so bad, why are people getting married, and worse, bringing children into this living hell on earth?

    What percentage of Hondurans don’t want the corruption? Isn’t it a democracy or does the Honduran equivalent of SCOTUS say corruption and cronyism is in the penumbras and eminations of their Constitution? Or do they want “just a little corruption”. Some petty bargain with Mephistopheles to make things good for them at the expense of others instead of true and proper Justice?

    My problem with the caravan is not so much that they are coming here for a better life – it is that they are doing so TOTALLY UNLIKE MY GRANDPARENTS that came here LEGALLY to learn English, work hard, and become Americans. Instead they demand Spanish be spoken, that existing US taxpayers pay for their care in the ER, and their kids education in schools, etc. And every one of them displaces someone WHO TRIES TO MIGRATE LEGALLY.

    Perhaps you should petition Trump to overthrow your wicked government (like we did with Sadam and Quadaffi) and then you will be free to create a country which can be an example of Christendom and Western Civilization. Or just send the caravan back, armed so they can do it themselves.

    • Dave

      “Isn’t it a democracy or does the Honduran equivalent of SCOTUS say corruption and cronyism is in the penumbras and eminations [sic] of their Constitution?”

      If you’re really interested in the answer to this question, I encourage you to read a pdf about corruption in Honduras that came out last year written by Sarah Chayes. It’s quite eye-opening.

      • diane r

        Honduras is not a democracy – it is a Kleptocracy (from Greek word meaning “thief” or “I steal” and “power, rule”). It is a government with corrupt leaders (kleptocrats) that use their power to exploit the people and natural resources of their own territory in order to extend their personal wealth and political powers. Typically, this system involves embezzlement of funds at the expense of the wider population. It is a puppet government put in place by the U.S. – perhaps that is the same direction that our government is headed.

        • Dave

          It’s good to come across someone who knows what they’re talking about

      • tz1

        Irrelevant if they are voting in the very corruption mentioned.
        If people vote for coruption, they ought not be suprised when they get corruption.

  • LaurieB

    Thank you for this helpful perspective. It’s hard for most of us to understand all the facets of what is going on.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear LaurieB: Thank you for reading the article and for your encouraging words. God bless you, and please pray with us that God’s will might be done with love both in the USA and in Honduras.

  • azsxdcf1

    God bless you, Jennifer, and God bless your efforts to turn the tide of that evil empire.

    The “caravaners” are trying to “hot-wire” their situation to steal our Christ-centered and Christ-inspired successes; and will therefore, and rightfully be turned away from our front door.

    God will not be mocked. (Galatians 6:7)

    • flachmom

      I would beg you to reconsider slamming a scripture on this situation. This is a much more complex situation as the author has pointed out. The underlying issue is that these people are being used as pawns by being promised something that doesnt exist. An easy way out.

      What I have learned from traveling is that people all over the globe, from every religious experience want pretty much the same things. A safe place, honest work, opportunities to grow and dignity.

      The caravan takes away pretty much all of that while promising all of those things. It’s sad, but the caravaners are not trying to ‘steal’ anything from us in America. Most of them are responding to the amped-up rhetoric of our current president and his ideologues who go out of his way to incite anger and sow discord.

      Receiving everyone at the border isn’t the answer, but turning them away with hate isn’t either.

      • Linda League

        They may not steal from us but our Government does, Refugees are given every benefit that America has to give and we lay this burden all on those that pay taxes. We have a legal immigration and refugee process and those that come should follow it and get our consent. When people break our laws, sometimes the consequences are harsh.

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Dear flachmom: Thank you for commenting on my article and for understanding that the issue at hand is very complex. God bless you, and please pray that God’s Word might be proclaimed with love in the midst of the current circumstances.

    • diane r

      Jennifer is certainly NOT “Christ like”, nor does she seem to be Christ-inspired; quite the contrary. Her story is that of a bitter and selfish woman. And Question? How can anyone “steal” Christ inspired success” ??? Christ’s love and inspiration cannot be bought and sold as you have suggested (but in fact is what your kind believe); your heretic attitude is precisely why Christ’s love has NEVER EXISTED in America ! The ‘ignorant’ heretic Christians that were expelled from Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries and “fled” to a faraway land [now known as America] to wreak religious and racial chaos, evil, and death and to STEAL my ancestor’s lands so they could annihilate our way of life with their heretic beliefs and their religious and race superiority, and to commit genocide upon my ancestors were NOT “Christ-centered” people. Christ did NOT follow your ancestors to my people’s lands….You sir, are pathetic.

      • flachmom

        Don’t return evil with evil. Hate doesn’t conquer hate.

        We’ve all done it, but is it really worth your energy to engage this way with a complete stranger?

      • Mathias Bjorkman

        Diane Jesus hated the self righteous pharisees, don’t be a pharisee

      • Linda League

        The Europeans who did this are dead and gone and others coming in had nothing to do with the past. Sometimes people cannot go forward because they refuse to let go of the past. Many wars were fought in various countries over land and most races have suffered atrocities at the hands of others. Hatred of others , no matter who or what for, can ruin a person’s soul.

        • richard briggs

          Do you feel the same way about the Jews going back to Israel. They were gone for a very long time. Longer than white people have been in America.

          • Anne E. Reid

            Aliyah: Jews fulfilling prophecy

          • Don’t look now but your ignorance is showing

          • Timebomb

            There is considerable genetic evidence recently emerging that stone-age Europeans were the first ‘native Americans.’

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Dear diane r: I am the woman who wrote the article, and I wanted to thank you for voicing your opinion on the matter. I am a believing Christian, and I’ve given my life to preach God’s Word (both in word and deed) on Honduran soil. Please pray that God’s will may be done through me and that He might grant me an increasingly Christ-like character. May God bless you and keep you.

      • Apollos

        Your comments reflect a cold, angry, and hard heart devoid of God. I will pray for you.

  • MBP

    Great perspective. I have been to La Ceiba several years ago on a Christian mission trip. There are a lot of good people in Honduras. Many are working hard to improve the country. At the time the economy seemed to be doing well. One thing I noticed that was a surprise. Many people drive fairly nice trucks. They keep them very clean. They just seemed out of place juxtaposed with the living conditions.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear MBP: Thank you for reading my article and for leaving your constructive comments. God bless you and your family.

  • Mathias Bjorkman

    The question is really, the people who are in the caravan were offered asylum, food, shelter and work by the Mexican authority. Why didn’t they accept it and why did they attack the Mexican police and military and force themselves through blockades. Why are they hell bent on going to united states and try to cross illegally. The issue is that when they enter United States illegally they have broken federal law and have no rights at all and are subject to deportation at will. If they want to enter the country they need to go to a port of entry and be subjugated to extensive background check.

    • Linda League

      Maybe the reason is what we do for refugees. There is a video on YouTube from a Josh Tolley with a woman who helped process them. She said that the refugees coming from the UN are not vetted and come on at midnight so people will not see them. She said they have all kinds of diseases and are released anyway. She said they are immediately put on social security, given life long disability if at all possible. Access to healthcare, education,housing, welfare, a passport and an electronic debit card where the funds are put because they don’t know their names in many cases or where they go.She is in Michigan and is alarmed because she feels an invasion is taking place in the country. She says thousands are being brought into the country. They had processed 50,000 last year and it was March when the video was made as I recall.

  • Middle Class Commentator

    Thank you for writing about Honduras and the reforms needed there. I will be praying for you and yours.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Middle Class Commentator: Thank you for reading my article and for your uplifting comments and promising to pray for us. May God’s Word be proclaimed in love both in the USA and in Honduras no matter the circumstances, and may God’s will be done.

  • Richard Casey

    Does everyone forget that we have the same problems in America!

    • Anne E. Reid

      that is not what this article is about..

  • Joyce Stephens Jorgensen

    Jennifer thank you for you information. My heart goes out to you and your husband for what you do to help the youth.
    We just returned from Sant Cruz Bolivia my husband was there for a MESSION 47 yrs ago. I fail in love with Bolivia and the people. Staying in the old part after 20 days I wanted to stay. Bless you for all you do.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Joyce Stephens Jorgensen: Thank you so much for your kind comments and encouragement. God bless you and your husband, and pray with us that God’s Word may be proclaimed with love in Honduras, the US (likewise Bolivia and all around the world) regardless of the circumstances.

  • Julie Abarca Cheek

    I have a friend from Honduras. Her mom came to the U.S. 1st and sponsered her and her siblings. Unfortunately, the uncle they stayed with molested them all. In the U.S. they faced much discrimination, not from whites, but Mexicans.

  • Susan Medley

    Their situations sound like many of the people who left Europe and other parts of the world to come to the US…before and after the American Revolution. People heard it was better and wanted a better life. The poor had little hope of bettering their lot in Europe and so they did what they could to send family members here with the hope they would be able to join them eventually. It is human nature to try for a better life. Maybe all of our ancestors should have stayed where they were and fought for a better life in Europe…or wherever they came from.

    • Bob643

      Perhaps you didn’t read closely. What about the fact that many of these people are seeking a dream but do not even want to put in the effort to get more than an elementary education? Some are okay with only a second grade education. I’m all for LEGAL immigration. But the caravan is NOT the right way to go about moving to the US.

    • Anne E. Reid

      snarky comments are just that…

    • jackrussell

      Susan Medley, all of the people who came to America were MUCH closer to countries different than their homes without crossing the Atlantic and even the Pacific to enter America. At the time that those immigrations were happening America was growing and had plenty of opportunities for immigrants who well understood that moving here was going to be a STARK and DRAMATIC change to their lives where there were no social services to speak of. People had to hit the ground running with the goal of building something for future generations by assimilating and producing. The apples and oranges scenario you present is not at all the same. There are 5 Billion people in the world who earn what the average Mexican earns or less. How many of them would you propose we take without strict screening and distinct needs for their particular services? How much do we as investors of trillions of dollars in the infrastructure of this nation need to hand over to these less fortunate people, by force of law, to allow them to have what they simply desire? We cannot help the 5 Trillion if we overwhelm ourselves at home with the millions. The only place that help for these people can happen is where they come from.

      • Susan Medley

        I did not say we should let all of these people in without vetting. Our country had a hand is the destabilization of their country. We have a responsibility to help in some fashion. I am surprised at the responses to my comment that was meant to show that these refugees have some of the desires, impulses, and needs, that our ancestors did. We should respond to all with compassion. We have enough money to spend several times over what anyone else in the world does on our military and to give enormous tax breaks to the very wealthy but little to help refugees from a country we helped destabilize. How very Christian of us not to see the face of Jesus in these refugees. Coming to this country for asylum is not illegal. Not to long ago we were proud of being a beacon of hope and freedom in the world. I am saddened by the venom and hatred and lack of Christian charity that now is expressed by some on this thread and the current administration.

        • Susan you are delusional, if you are actually trying to compare historical accounts with present invasions. I’ll bet you are totally ignorant of the muzslime agenda too aren’t you. Please get your head out of the sand and READ and do NOT believe anything you hear on the m s m, if you are still following those LIARS.!!!!!!

    • Ann Dinkel

      Please note the difference between legal immigration ( I have all of my great grandparents paperwork from Ellis Island) and a mob crossing a border. We want legal immigrants.

  • caskinner

    Sounds to me like some of the people fleeing their country just want someone (US taxpayers) to take care of them. Not willing to be educated and work hard. Teach a man to fish……

    • poundin_pavement

      I have spent a significant amount of time in central America and have maintained friendships from there over the past 20+ years, and I have NEVER seen the attitude of a prospective immigrant to be wanting someone to take care of them in America. Finding a landscaping or construction job and getting paid $15-$20/hour sounds like the promised land. A similar job in Honduras or Nicaragua may make $100/month (versus $2400/month at $15/hr). Yes, cost of living is lower, too, but not THAT much lower. And you don’t realize true cost of living until you already live in the USA.

      • Well the new American Dream is FREE STUFF. Seriously how many of them do you think are coming here to “work” that’s a four letter word to most of them.

        • poundin_pavement

          Like I said, speaking from my personal experience, 100% of them have been looking for work, or looking to be with family if they are elderly. Do you have personal experience to the contrary? Please share. Simply pointing out that government aid helps this very high risk population, isn’t evidence they don’t want to work. I’ve known some second generation who are looking more for the government dole, but as for those personally choosing to leave their homes and families, risking so much to come here illegally? They DEFINITELY want to work, in my experience.

          • Do you also get your “news” from the msm? If you do that could be the reason you do not understand the truth of what is actually going on. There are thousands of the invaders who have NO OTHER intent than to freeload steal rob and destroy. And do you have something against our laws that allow for honest legal entry into our nation? You don’t seem to like America very much and would rather destroy everything we have stood for for over two hundred years. Are you a supporter of OWO AND OWR and totalitarian death to all dissenters? That is what you are supporting if you do not want us to have control of our borders. Why don’t you move to Honduras, and help them work hard to make THEIR nation great.??????

          • poundin_pavement

            I’d be curious to meet you and spend an hour talking about these things over hot chocolate. I’m confused about what your intent is with creating a straw man argument against me. I actually do support strong borders. I have not referred to news reports at all, msm, Infowars, or otherwise. I referred to my personal experience as a non-expert, but as someone with significant experience in this regard. I have lived in Central America and I have maintained contact with friends over the years who continue to live there. I have lived in South Texas, although I probably knew more illegal immigrants in Philadelphia and DC, than in Texas. I’m even calling them illegal immigrants and not “undocumented”. I’m simply pointing out that of my experience, they are looking for work, not a free ride. That doesn’t mean they should come in illegally.

            I’m sure there are some coming as gangsters, although numerically that’s probably not most. We definitely see “anecdotal” (there’s that word again) evidence of some bad ones.

            Now I’m wondering if you’re a real person, or a robot simply posting anti-immigrant talking points? We probably both largely agree about what should be done, as far as the border. Our disagreement appears to lie in whether or not we should hate people simply because they have entered or are trying to enter our country illegally.

          • poundin_pavement

            For the record, I am financially assisting efforts for “these people” (not in Honduras specifically) to get a foot up in their own country, and I’m not financially supporting any efforts in promoting illegal immigration in this country.

            Are you supporting humanitarian work or economic development in Central America?

          • Poundin, if they are good people WHY are they part of a herd of miscreants, trying to force themselves on us. They are not escaping death they simply want the gravy train they think America has to offer. Illegals are ABSOLUTELY costing us a WHOLE LOT MORE than they are contributing. And absolutely there are huge numbers of totally deadly young males totally dedicated to our destruction among them. And if this bunch of parasites get in the flood will begin. Is there something about all this you aren’t understanding. Do you understand that yoururp is already destroyed, do you really want America to be like them. Seriously where do you get your “news”. Do you not understand that the msm are the biggest promoters of the utterly horrible OWO thugs. Do you like the idea of having our constitution destroyed? And in closing YES I ABSOLUTELY DO HATE EVIL. To try to destroy a nation by forcing leeches into it is evil.

          • poundin_pavement

            My comments are referring to the general population of illegal immigrants, and not specifically this new caravan. I’m not sure what’s at the core of this new caravan, but it certainly smells like it’s orchestrated by ant-Trumpers, and not organic from Honduras. While it’s politically convenient to pick a Boogeyman and consider any illegal immigrant an evil monster, I think it’s shutting down effective political discourse for problem solving. You are effectively taking someone like me who is pro-strong borders, anti-illegal immigration, pro-sustainable welfare system, and you’re kicking me out of your discussion, suggesting I’m a bleeding heart liberal, just because the illegal immigrants I’ve known have all been willing and expecting to work. You’re suggesting that simply because I’m not of your mindset that virtually every illegal immigrant is a lazy, freeloading criminal, that I’m hopeless in participating in this discussion.
            I think that the majority of this country can support immigration reform that includes strong borders, safeguards for our welfare system, and at the same time shows respect and compassion for those illegally in our country (or trying to come in) who are otherwise essentially law abiding. Just like the more conservative half of our nation will never support immigration reform that doesn’t include strong borders, the more liberal half of our nation will never support immigration reform that doesn’t demonstrate respect and compassion for those in the middle of it.

          • Well poundin one day soon you will wake up and realize you too will have to actually choose a side between true good or true evil. Meanwhile you seem stuck in the middle of the road. I simply detest moderates perhaps more than I do outspoken side takers. It’s the moderates that prolong the truth from being presented and dealt with. You all have a good day now yu heah!

          • Apollos

            Self restraint please. If you are a Christine, then please heed to the voice of God in your spirit that says you are too argumentative. The Spirit of Christ is not harsh and angry, but speaks with grace and not just truth.

          • So let me get this straight Apo. You think I should moderate the truth for your and others like you delicate sensitive. Truth doesn’t work that way. No one can modify the truth it remains long after stupid feelings lie in the dust.

          • Jonathan Kavanagh

            You seem forget that Christ was the Rock of offense. He wasnt concerned with peoples feelings only the truth of the Father. If something isnt of God it os evil. I am tied of all the calls I see for grey….black and white. God said he cant stand someone that is luke warm.

          • Jonathan Kavanagh

            Thats great and all and I have a similar experience as far as work history, but everyone misses the point, it doesnt matter if they work hard or sit on thier buts if they are here illegal then they are breaking our laws. That means that they will be dealt with according to that rule of law.

          • poundin_pavement

            Jonathan, there is a difference between being tolerant of illegal immigration or being “lukewarm” and recognizing that the world isn’t a cartoon with one dimensional issues. I completely agree with you that the rule of law should be enforced and also the new laws should be enforceable. I also obviously agree with you regarding the with ethic, and as logically follows, the motives of many who have chosen to break those laws. Laws can be enforced and new laws created that both show respect and compassion to the plight of these people, while still resulting in enforcement and development of sustainable plans that will strengthen our borders and security. I think that’s what most Americans want, and I don’t think it’s lukewarm at all.

          • poundin_pavement

            I don’t think I’m missing the point, I think I’m making a separate valid point. Supporting a strong border does not require asserting that every illegal immigrant is a lazy freeloader. We can be respectful and compassionate to these individuals and families, while still having strong borders and a solvent and sustainable welfare system.

      • jackrussell

        The facts simply don’t support your rhetorical example. We spend BILLIONS on welfare for these illegal immigrants OVER AND ABOVE the massive amount that LEGAL immigrants drain away from our system. Helping these people HERE is vastly more expensive than helping them where they come from. These people have ZERO claim on a $7.35/ hr. minimum wage job, let alone a decent paying blue collar job in this country. It is increasingly repulsive to hear defenses of law breakers who DO IN FACT drain our coffers and upset our economic balance costing tax payers both opportunities and resources. You can bury your head in the sand if that is how you’re wired. As a patriot, I don’t elect representatives and obey the law and pay my taxes to have some bleeding heart Leftist excuse away the squandering of the resources that should be used to support my LEGAL family. The disdain for education in their culture alone disqualified many of them from even candidacy for residence in this country under any circumstance.

        • poundin_pavement

          Your argument is all over the map. Are you complaining about people illegally coming to this country to take both minimum wage and blue collar jobs or are they all just looking for handouts? In my mind those are two opposite intents.

          Thanks for calling me a bleeding heart leftist, since I’m actually a social and economic conservative. My point is about the motive of these people coming here specifically from Central America. It’s my experience that the intent as they leave their Homeland and arrive here is not to receive welfare, rather to find an opportunity for economic growth for their families.

          When people try to paint these immigrants as a group looking for a free ride, I just haven’t seen that to be accurate. Are they availing themselves of whatever government supplied benefits they can, too? Of course they are. Just like everyone else in this country on every rung of the economic ladder. I just haven’t seen that as typically the primary intent on coming here.

          It is a diverse group, though, so I’m sure you’re right about some of them. The drug and human traffickers and terrorists that enter illegally are another issue entirely.

          Let’s start by loving our neighbor. That doesn’t mean we let them all in, but start by loving them. If we can agree on that, maybe we can have more success in coming up with visitan solutions that we can all get behind.

          • Sh Ke Bob

            My experiences are the same. I have never met a lazy immigrant, legal or illegal, from central America, and I’ve met thousands of them. I work in construction. I see them every day. Cutting grass. Remodeling bathrooms. Replacing roofs. You name it. They work their butts of doing it. And they don’t complain.

          • Apollos

            You need to calm down. You are being too argumentative and aggressive. Please show some restraint and geace in your words.

        • poundin_pavement

          Please look up the difference between rhetorical and anecdotal. This is my experience. It’s not made up or imaginary. It’s possible that I’ve not met the “median” illegal immigrant, and have a biased sample, but it’s certainly not rhetorical.

        • Timebomb

          “It is increasingly repulsive to hear defenses of law breakers who DO IN FACT drain our coffers and upset our economic balance costing tax payers both opportunities and resources.” — I agree. Endless uncontrolled, illegal, immigration is a big problem. Cheap labor lowers everyone’s wages. Leftists have ‘no problem’ with that because of their belief that everyone should receive an equal outcome from what ever they do and it is the moral role of government to make that happen via confiscatory wealth redistribution. It also feeds the leftist narrative that Capitalism doesn’t really work.

    • Jonathan Kavanagh

      Amen

  • Ken Cooley

    As with anything we who are Christ followers must pray first, listen, then lead. There are people around the world who are being martyred for their faith in Jesus. The gangs and drug lords and corrupt government leaders in these nations are causing a great deal of harm to the citizens of these nations and thus causing some to want to abandon at all costs their roots, their homes and their livelihoods for a hope that some other place like America can offer them freedom from fear. Only Jesus can off this whether you live in America or in Honduras. I hope that they can stay in their homelands and raise up their families in peace. They must have a revolution as we did in this land over 200 years ago and choose to stand up against tyranny. If not, they will bring their orphan spirit here and not do all that well. If you do not stand for what is right where you are you’ll give up land and your home everywhere else you go in the future. We need to pray for them, love on them and support them right where they are at now. Not bring them here because we cannot bring everyone here and how do you choose one over the other. Love conquers all. Jesus brings peace.

    • Jesus does not always “bring peace”. He said in fact “I did not come to bring peace but division”. Those who receive and believe will live His message and will know peace within themselves as His Holy Spirit indwells them. ALL others will ultimately only know distress and death. It is totally false to preach Jesus as totally love and peace. “Love Without Truth Is Just Another Lie”…..

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Ken Cooley: Thank you for your Biblically-centered comments regarding my article and the situation at hand. Please pray with us that God’s Word might be proclaimed with love both in Honduras and the USA during this time, regardless of the circumstances. God bless you.

  • G Miller

    9 million people can change a country if they really wanted.

    • Sh Ke Bob

      Tell that to the Jews.

      • Jonathan Kavanagh

        There is no jew outwardly. The temple that held the books that list the names of Jews where destroyed in roughly 70ad when Rome was sacked. With out the books they arw not jews but a none nationalized people. There are no more offerings made, no sacrifices therefore no jew. Christ said that there was no Jew outwardly any l9nger but only the inward Jew, I think I will listen to him on that one. Neither bond nor free, neither Jew nor Greek that the elected of God are all inwards Jews.

  • deepmagic

    I truly hope my friends will pause for a moment to read this short article. I feel that I have a unique view on immigration because of my multicultural background. I’m the grand-daughter of legal European immigrants who had to leave their native lands because of health reasons on my father’s side. My mother was born in Cuba to parents and grandparents who were lifetime missionaries in Cuba and returned to America under the persecution of Castro who attempted to assassinate her father. Meanwhile, other family (uncles) chose to remain in Cuba under the regime and continue ministering to the Cuban people. As far as we know, they died in Cuba. MY father was raised in Colombia and Ecuador where fanatical police attempted to murder his father. I lived in Russia soon after the wall came down where in mafia-run Moscow I was accosted three times, knocked out once, run over, and experienced the violence of a bank robbery. We are well aware of ABJECT POVERTY in all these locations including Russia. When I read this article, my multi-generational missionary background recognized the authenticity of her assessments and I concur with her conclusions.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear deepmagic: Thank you so much for sharing your very impressive/diverse family background and for commenting on my article. God bless you and your family. Please pray with us that God’s Word might be proclaimed with love both in the USA and Honduras (and other nations around the globe) regardless of circumstances.

  • Timebomb

    This is another one of the many controversies and political situations which today’s mainstream U.S. leftist media mentalities prefer, for nefarious purposes of disinformation and indoctrination, to obscure the truth about, or to ignore. What the ‘old school’ Marxist-Leninists started in the U.S. in the early 1930’s has become an ongoing MENTALITY, and about half of the U.S. population is now imbued with it. Leftism or neo-Marxism appeals to both altruism and narcissism in human nature. It appeals to altruism in terms of people wanting to ‘help others’ (including importing Muslim and other “refugees seeking asylum” infiltrated by gangsters and terrorists), and narcissism in terms of ‘feeling good about oneself’ for being a ‘social leader’ by having all the ‘politically correct’ views and ideals. It’s good to read someone explaining truthfully what the real situation in Honduras actually is.

    • Christine Nelson Bunow

      When people take the God of the Bible out of their lives then they make up their own religion – Judges 21:25 “In those days there was no king in Israel; everyone did what was right in their own eyes.” This is what we are seeing in our country, in our news media, in the government and yes, even if not especially in our churches.

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Thank you, Christine Nelson Bunow, for sharing this perspective from God’s Word. God bless you, and please pray with us for God’s will to be done in the USA and in Honduras and for His Word to be proclaimed with love no matter the situation.

    • Timebomb

      We don’’t understand anything about the left if we don’t understand it is a
      religion. It’s a religion that denies reality.
      Lacking belief in God, or the recognition of transcendental Reality, the left needs to have states of socialist Big Government totalitarianism to believe in. Leftists believe in leftism as much as any traditional religious cleric believes in his traditional religion. The difference is that left, fights those who fight evil. It does not fight evil.

      • Right on, Time. The left is evil the war between good and evil is taking shape.
        I ask people, “When the shooting war starts will you know who to shoot”?

        • Judy Beasley- Tapp

          While I don’t agree with most of the left, I reallize they are also children of God and thus I cannot and should not classify them as evil.

          • Why don’t you stop going by you feelings, and study a bit. If you don’t understand that there is a war coming soon you do not understand our Lords admonition to understand the times. Do you somewhat know the Bible and understand what I am talking about. Every person on the planet will be on the side of good or the side of evil. Is that so difficult for you to grasp. Those advocating for no borders and allowing the free inflow of invaders are supporting the GLOBS who hate our nation our constitution and our Christian way of life. Why do you defend those who want to destroy everything this nation has ever stood for? Are you ignorant? Do you ignore facts and go totally by your foolish feelings????

          • Mary Smith

            But you can classify what they believe in and what they say and do as evil.

          • Judy Beasley- Tapp

            Actions yes, but I cannot judge their heart.

          • Jonathan Kavanagh

            You can identify a tree by its fruit, if they back evil and figjt for evil ( just supporting the so called right to slaughter unborn infants is enough for me) then they are evil and should be fought.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Timebomb: I am glad you enjoyed my article. Please pray with us for God’s will to be done in the USA and in Honduras. God bless you.

  • Shalar

    I believe anyone can come to America & make a better life IF they come in LEGALLY.. ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS should NOT be allowed in the U.S.A. regardless of their condtitions. We worked our way to our pay not steal it from another country.

    • Sh Ke Bob

      It is legal to travel to the U.S. from anywhere in the world and then apply for asylum. As of yet, as far as the U.S. laws are concerned, none of these people have done anything illegal.

      • Apollos

        The Geneva Convention defines a refugee and none of them meet this definition. As to the idea that people can come from anywhere… There is a long-standing interpretation of first safe country and that would have been Mexico. So, since they were officially offered to make an assylum claim there and outright refused, that means that they are now illegally seeking to apply in the U.S.

      • Janet Ferguson

        Correct

    • Janet McMonagle

      My family just got a visa for legal spousal immigration. It took 15 months and a lot of money for fees and travel. That process is separate from the process for asylum. Legal immigration is not easily accessible and in some places is impossible.

      Before my son married his wife, he tried to bring her home for two weeks on a temporary 6 month tourist visa. They paid the fees, did all the right things, had all the documents. They traveled overnight to the US Embassy in Tegucigalpa to keep an appointment for a 5 minute interview. There, they were told that although they had done everything right, his girlfriend was a college student living home with her mother. No job and no property. So the automatic assumption was that she would overstay the visa. My son had brought addresses and contact info of everyone they would visit, everywhere they would go. Answer was the same – “Not today. Come back in six months and try again.”

      Just about everyone in the long line at the US Embassy that day that they talked to – ie people their age, under 30- said they were told pretty much the same thing. One guy was traveling for vacation with his parents. His middle aged parents got the visas – he was denied, for the same reason. College student – you will probably overstay. They canceled their trip. (BTW that’s three nonrefundable fees of $165 each for that family – plus expenses for travel to the Embassy, which is not easy in Honduras)

      In learning Spanish, I have connected to a local bilingual conversation group – a lot of the people from Central and South America have had this same experience. Even if they have visited the USA before!

      I have a friend who married a man from Holland. He has a green card and lives and works here legally. His sister decided she’d like to take a break from school and come to the USA for a few months. College student. No job. Lives with mama. Does not own property. What do you think they told her when she applied for her visa?

      “Have a nice trip.”

      Legal immigration is not accessible, affordable, or administered in a uniform, efficient, transparent manner. And no one cares, left or right. In fact, our system incentivizes illegal migration.

      When my son first filed his petition to bring his wife, it took four months for the NVC in New Hampshire to even LOOK at it. I suspect that they did it that quickly because a congressman made an inquiry. I’ve been told by others in the same situation that it can take eight months for NVC to EVEN LOOK AT A PETITION. Im not talking about confirming it has been received – that happens within 30 days. But LOOKING at it – that takes months. And that’s just for spouses, If you are trying to bring a parent, a sibling, a son or daughter, the period is longer. That’s for LOOKING at the petition – not all the investigation that goes with it.

      With that in mind, some people just take their chances, depending on what is going on with their family.

      There’s a lot of advocacy for refugees, and that is a good thing – but not a lot of advocacy for reforming our “broken immigration system” that we love to whine about. Until there is just as much pressure from the public about that, Congress and the various Presidents will continue to not care at all and play political games.

  • The US has a long history of MEDDLING in the affairs of Central and South American Nations, and cannot disassociate itself from the Culture the US fostered during the MEDDLING

    “although it is true that much corruption, lack of opportunities and violence abound. There are very heavy “war taxes” that gangs place on local businesses, making it very difficult for many to earn an honest living. If you don’t pay the demanded rate each month, your life may be taken.”

    In regards to unpunished violence, my husband’s brother was shot dead point-blank two years ago and no police action was taken even after filing several reports with eye witnesses. And three years ago, my husband was kidnapped and brutally beaten by local gang lords only to confront similar apathy from the authorities once he escaped.

    When cattle thieves stole and killed our two milking cows last year, I walked down the gravel road to the local police station only for the policeman to shrug and tell me that that type of crime is to be expected. No action was taken to investigate or punish the crime.”

    This writer says “If you don’t pay the demanded rate each month, your life may be taken.”

    American couch potatoes could not grasp living in those conditions that would motivate people to seek Refugee Status in the Land of the Free, men, women and children walking 1500 miles,to get there and take their chances going through the Legal procedures applying for Refugee Status in the US legally. They just have to reach the US-Mexican Border.

    Because you have kept the word of my patience, I also will keep you from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world, to try them that dwell upon the earth.

    In my Faith in God through Christ Jesus, I believe the US is being “tried” with this Caravan in the Spirit of this letter in all Bibles.
    Then shall he say also to them on the left hand, Depart from me, you cursed, into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels:
    For I was an hungry, and ye gave me no meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me no drink:
    I was a stranger, and you did not take me in: naked, and you did not clothe me: sick, and in prison, and you did not visit me.

    Then shall they also answer him, saying, Lord, when did we see YOU hungry, or thirsty, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and did not minister to YOU?

    Then shall he answer them,
    saying, Truly I say to you, Inasmuch as you did it not to one of the least of these, you did it not to me.
    And these shall go away into everlasting punishment: but the righteous into life eternal.

    • Timebomb

      It’s difficult to understand how the Biblical story of the good Samaritan and “Love your neighbor as yourself” – Matthew 22: 39, along with other such teachings of Jesus realistically apply to the organized well-supplied caravan headed toward our border. The U.S. already gives virtually all of the beneficent foreign aid that is given by anyone in the world. I wonder how it is really the fault of the U.S. that their Governments’ squander the $ we give them, without supervision, to help their people by making their countries better places to live so, their citizens won’t have to go elsewhere trying to find better places to live?

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Ray Joseph Cormier: Thank you for sharing your perspective and for your commitment to living out God’s will as it is presented in the Bible. God bless you and your family.

    • Jonathan Kavanagh

      The bible also requires us to follow the laws in the country that we live. The bible is to be taken as a whole not chopped up into pieces for fancy words in a facebook post. They will be required to follow our process, of not they should go home and do as we did many generations ago amd fight to make their home better not invade amother country illegally.

      • Jonathan, in the Beginning, the Bible tells us when Cain killed Able, the 1st murder, Cain was in fear of Capital punishment.

        What did God do?

        God put a mark on Cain so no one would kill him, saying if anyone killed Cain, it would be 7 times worse. Eventually someone else killed someone else.

        These 6000 years later, devising new, more lethal ways to kill People is BIG BUSINESS, and no one thinks of that contradiction, if you are going to take the Bible as a whole, from Beginning to End.

        The Pro-Lifers don’t have the passion or commitment to Life to fight that systemic reality, with Millions of People killed just with current Wars.

  • Rodney B Rich

    Wow, thank you for writing this article, as one with confused emotions about the caravan, this article has really shed a new and somewhat different light on the subject! God bless you, your family and your efforts to make real change!

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Thank you, Rodney B Rich, for your encouraging words. I’m very pleased that the article was able to help you understand the situation in a new light. God bless you and your family.

      • Rodney B Rich

        Keep striving to make a difference!

  • jimpemberton

    We just helped our Venezuelan workers move to Mexico where they entered legally and have legally requested and received asylum. Our hope is for Venezuela to be restored enough to go back and minister there. Meanwhile, we have Mexicans and Venezuelan transplants who need ministry in Mexico. We also have Venezuelan associates who have gone to Ecuador and Chile where they can minister. It’s hard to cover all the places where Venezuelans are fleeing. Honduras and El Salvador both have difficult situations right now. We know Slavadorans in Mexico and here in our town in the States who have fled.

    Has the US meddled in the affairs of other countries? Sure. Has it always been for their good? Not always. Different administrations have different policies and some are better than others. If the US is to be a place for people to come to request asylum at all, then I would argue that it justifies any meddling we do. If a government is terrible enough to force its people to flee, then the country tasked with helping them should necessarily use international influence to try to change that terrible government to stop their people from suffering so that they are able to generate the wealth and civil accountability needed to sustain their own country so they aren’t a burden on the rest of the world. Meanwhile, there are those of us who will try to help people where they are without taxing our governments for it.

    • Timebomb

      It’s difficult to understand how the Biblical story of the good Samaritan and “Love your neighbor as yourself.” – Matthew 22: 39, properly apply to the organized well-supplied caravan headed toward our border. The U.S. already gives virtually all of the beneficent foreign aid that is given by anyone in the world. I wonder how it is really the fault of the U.S. that their Governments’ squander the $ we give them, without supervision, to help their people by making their countries better places to live so, their citizens won’t have to go elsewhere trying to find better places to live?

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear jimpemberton: Thank you so much for your thoughtful, well-informed comments on my article. I am in full agreement with what you said: “If a government is terrible enough to force its people to flee, then the country tasked with helping them should necessarily use international influence to try to change that terrible government to stop their people from suffering so that they are able to generate the wealth and civil accountability needed to sustain their own country so they aren’t a burden on the rest of the world.” Thank you for sharing this perspective. God bless you, and thank you for ministering with and to the Latin Americans.

  • Donna Eliason

    How could US and Canada help improve conditions in Honduras? Help people clean up the government, help establish industries, train police, bolster families?? The huge money spent on illegals could be better spent on fixing their own country – and people here would be much more open to contributing to that.

    • Mary Smith

      We already give them millions upon millions of dollars.

      • Sh Ke Bob

        Giving money to corrupt governments does little to help the people.

        • Jennifer Zilly Canales

          You are exactly right; the government must be honest in order to handle the funds with transparency and efficacy for the good of the nation.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Donna Eliason: You present very, very good (and not easily answered) questions. I am of the same mindset as you: it would be much wiser and more effective to very closely examen the money already being given to Honduras (which many suspect stays in the hands of a few and is not distributed as it should be to effect long-term change) and see what changes can be made there rather than investing a lot of US dollars into helping the immigrant caravan (if they should even pass the US border). The Honduran government definitely needs to be “cleaned up” as you mentioned, and there is much additional work to be done on a national level, of which I am not an expert so I will not give my opinion. Thank you for your positive, constructive comments on my article, and please be praying with us that God’ will would be done in the USA and in Honduras.

  • JohnTharpe68

    What a well written, and well articulated point of view. God bless you for choosing to continue your way of life, under such difficult political, and economical turmoil, not to mention the threats of violence you and your family have already endured. I agree with your statement that “this process should be done LEGALLY,” and my prayer is that many/all will do so LEGALLY! What I don’t understand is why the caravan, and others that have followed, have refused asylum from Mexico. Why target the United States, when bordering countries are offering asylum, and a place of refuge?

    • Timebomb

      Most likely the caravan is organized, supplied, and is being coached by Democrat undercover operatives to create political problems for President Trump and make him out to be a really bad guy that is plainly deserving of impeachment if he doesn’t just let them all walk in.

      • Jonathan Kavanagh

        Good thing impeachment only works if he breaks the law. Since our laws demand,a process to enter the US any that try I am sure all be dealt with. Something everyone should remwber is that the US military is 40 to 50 years ahead in tech than the common US citizen, meaning that they are ways to lawfully deal with these illegals I wont call them,immigrants because that implies they are lawful. 15000 troops, dont believe that there will be troops on the ground that will never be seen by good ir bad media, I was in the military amd have a good grasp of what they can do when needed. They will be dealt with. I am not suppirting violence just stating a fact.

      • ansonia

        I think that’s true. BUT I don’t think the people behind this could have incited this many people to travel here in this way if a lot of them weren’t dealing with violence, chaos and intimidation from crime gangs and drug lords in different areas of Central America.

        • Timebomb

          I saw a report two days ago that there are lots of people from the middle east now joining in the caravan. Apparently it’s getting to be a mélange of all kinds of people, not just from Central America. Who (or what) is getting them all to think that their amassing in a huge number on Mexico’s northern border is going to gain them entry into the U.S., would be interesting to truthfully find out.

          • ansonia

            Seems to me Antifa beats up and intimidates only unarmed people. So far, they’ve avoided putting themselves in much danger.

          • Timebomb

            That part of my comment was factious.

    • Mary Smith

      They want the stuff that they have heard about, so much of it welfare for which they won’t have to work. Most just want a better life or better jobs. It’s not about asylum for the most part. But the progressives always find ways to tell them what to say and how to get away with breaking the law so these illegals will eventually end of voting for the Dems. And the Repubs want the cheap labor. Very few are listening to the American people to hear what we want.

      • Timebomb

        Endless illegal immigration is a big problem. Cheap labor lowers everyone’s wages. Genuine Republicans don’t want that for U.S. citizens. It also feeds the leftist narrative that Capitalism doesn’t work.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear JohnTharpe68: I am the woman who wrote the article, and I wanted to thank you for your encouraging words and constructive comments. God bless you and your family.

    • ansonia

      Are the bordering countries really offering that or just saying so. Mexico seems to have a recent history of deporting migrants who do the right thing and apply for asylum once they get to Mexico(1). So, it’s possible the people of the caravans don’t trust that they won’t be deported, regardless of how true it is that they were being extorted by criminals in the places they fled, if they leave the crowd to take Mexico up on this new “you are home” offer.
      (1) “Outsourcing Refoulement: The United States and the Central American Refugee Crisis”, by Aaron Korthuis.
      I think Korthuis could be wrong that Mexico has kept, or even tried to keep, migrants from traveling illegally through Mexico to get here. He isn’t likely wrong about the percentage of people who were deported by Mexico after applying there for asylum in this country or Mexico.

  • “they would gamble everything for their slice of the American Dream.”
    First off there is no “American Dream” the 2008 debacle and 8 very loooong years of the b o in our White House put the final nail in that dithering idea. The immigrants that don’t want to work hard and do their best to make THEIR nation better will only further erode the once great nation. This is a good article from an honest person.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Don Spilman: I am the woman who wrote the article, and I wanted to thank you for your constructive comments. God bless you, and please pray with us for God’s will to be done both in the USA and in Honduras.

  • mikifenn

    What happens to the foreign aid we send Honduras?

    • disqusjen

      weapons for the drug lords? just a guess

    • Janet McMonagle

      Much of it is military. A small part goes to USAID for relief, and from what I have seen has tremendous impact for good.

      The military aid goes right into the pockets of the dictatorship which masquerades as a democracy – which we endorse. Time to end that.

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Thank you for sharing your input, Janet McMonagle, and please pray with us for God’s will to be done in this country — on the level of government and also in individual lives. Thank you!

  • Molly

    I admire you for caring so much and helping these people, but I do not wish to help them. I feel they are lazy and not willing to work to make a better life for themselves. They come here to the U.S. to live off the work of others, and they do not seem to feel any shame in that. To me such people are not worthy of help.

    • quez

      Clearly, she is all for helping the Hondurans to STAY in Honduras and make an honest life there. It’s an uphill battle for sure.

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Thank you for understanding this! God bless you.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Molly, I am the woman who wrote the article, and I wanted to thank you for voicing your opinion/concern. You absolutely don’t have to help anyone. As “Quez” commented below, I am all for encouraging Hondurans to stay in Honduras so that we might find a solution here. God bless you, and please pray with us for positive, Spirit-led change in Honduras.

      • Jesus is my friend

        You are being of great service to America. Please continue your work to send no more of them Honduras miscreants to the USA. Keep them uneducated people where they are. I don’t want them living around me or off my tax money. You are being a great ambassador for USA and President Trump.

        • Jennifer Zilly Canales

          Dear “Jesus is my friend”: Thank you for your well-intentioned comments, but I do not intend to be an ambassador for either country nor any president. I am outside of politics and simply desire to be a servant of Christ among the people, respecting as best I can any and all governments involved. I live in both worlds (that of the Americans and of the Hondurans), and I love the people of both nations. Thank you again for commenting on the article, but I don’t wish to be a political ambassador, nor do I wish to speak poorly of the Hondurans I live alongside of every day. God bless you, and please pray with us that God’s will might be done both in the USA and in Honduras and that the name of Christ might be glorified.

  • Sumerian King

    I know this is completely off-topic, but for those privy to history, this mass-movement of lower-class and working-class civilians with only the clothes on their back making their way across hundreds of miles towards a desired goal (the U.S.) seems like what the People’s Crusade of the late 11th Century would have looked like as they made their way across Europe to the Holy Land. (Before they were destroyed by the Seljuks in Anatolia, that is.) Also, just as we see some of the people in this caravan committing crimes, defying borders, and creating chaos, this is also similar to, but less vicious than, the People’s Crusade, such as when they murdered and looted their way across Jewish communities in the Rhineland, modern Germany, in 1095/96(?). Again, I know this is off-topic, but I just thought it was an interesting observation.

    • Yes, that was their pay going on the Christian Crusades to wage War on the Muslims. they were able to rape and loot without punishment on the way to and back from the so called Holy Land.

      So says the Lord, “The heavens are My throne,
      and the earth is My footstool;
      which is the house that you will build for Me,
      and which is the place of My rest?

      If the foot that touches the footstool is Holy, it makes this WHOLE EARTH HOLY, not just that small sliver of land over which so much War and blood has been shed over the Centuries.

      That scriptural picture is BIG to grasp, let alone get it into practice in words and deeds.

      That thought is just like Jesus the Christ saying, ‘ And call no man your father upon the earth: for one is your Father, which is in heaven.’ That is a big to get in practice. If Believers believed those ideas, every effort would be made to stop the far off wars, especially in Yemen, and change the “system.”

      American Christians would have their eyes opened to recognize the grave evil in the FACT the US is the biggest seller of the Weapons of Death and Destruction to this World.

      The kingdom of heaven is within you and you are within the US. Change yourselves, change the US, change the World. Isn’t that the mission of those who really do believe?

      Christ knows those he describes this way, ‘You hypocrites, well did Esaias prophesy of you, saying,
      This people draws close to me with their mouth, and honours me with their lips; but their heart is far from me.
      But in vain they do worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men.

      Christ affirms that thought with these words recorded in all Christian Bibles;

      Not every one that says to me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that does the will of my Father which is in heaven.
      Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in YOUR name? and in YOUR name have cast out devils? and in YOUR name done many wonderful works?

      And then will I profess to them, I never knew you: depart from me, you that work iniquity.

      Here the Lord is telling us there are Jews, Christians, and Muslims, so confident and comfortable in their own self-righteousness, but not the righteousness of Christ, thinking they are ‘Saved’ but in the end, won’t be.

      • Dumb comment!!!

        • Facts don’t matter to those who already have their mind made up.

          • HAHAHAHAHAAAA!!!! Yes I noticed as I was reading your odd anti Christ disconnected rant, thanks for clarifying ROFL!!!!!

          • You are so deluded in your imaginings. Anti-Christ rant??? You can’t even read, or you don’t understand the meaning of the word?

          • Have you ever read the Bible through and sought the the Fathers guidance as you read? You throw around scripture like disconnected musical notes they are discordinant and pointless.

          • To you.

            The Bible was the 1st Book I read cover to cover when I learned how to read at 7.

            The Father’s guidance led to The Kansas City Times publishing 2 reports on my personal Voyage of Faith in God in the Spirit of ’76. I had no money, or Organization supporting me, and no famous name to open the door and have. That was the Lord’s doing.

            These are excerpts of what they published on September 13, 1976. It is only with the benefit of 42 years hindsight, can it be seen God is fulfilling the word in the Message.

            “He came to town for the Republican National Convention and will stay until the election in November TO DO GOD’S BIDDING: To tell the world, from Kansas City, this country has been found wanting and its days are numbered […] He gestured toward a gleaming church dome. “The gold dome is the symbol of Babylon,” he said.” […] He wanted to bring to the Public’s attention an “idea being put out subtly and deceptively” by the government that we have to get prepared for a war with Russia.”

            Believe it or not, that 1976 FUTURE is NOW, with the Revelation of the details GENERALLY unfolding in the spirit of the letter.

            The World is waking up to see Trump may hasten “its days are numbered” part of the 1976 Vision and waits with bated breath. Good is still possible.

            The Kansas City Times did a follow up on ALL SOULS DAY, November 2, 1976. The TV movie ‘THE DAY AFTER’ Kansas City was incinerated in a Nuclear Holocaust appeared in 1983.

            At THE END, the movie pauses at the very same picture frame The Kansas City Times chose for the ALL SOULS DAY record 7 years earlier, except I had nothing to do with the movie.

            Any way you look at it, that HISTORICAL FACT is a confirming SIGN for our Generations, the World
            has finally arrived at this point of Decision, of an “idea being put out subtly and deceptively” by the government that we have to get prepared for a war with Russia” slowly working in it’s way into the
            American Psyche with the drumbeat of War within and outside the US.
            The constant US anti-Russia/Putin Propaganda in the media 24/7 for the last 2 years, confirms that part of the preparation in the 1976 Vision is well under way.

            Few will recognize, “this country has been found wanting and its days are numbered” as the 1st
            two parts, of the 3 part “Writing on the Wall” from Daniel 5 and the Captivity of Babylon some 2600 years ago.

            The whole world saw “The Writing on the Wall” for the 1st TIME at the same TIME, with the Global
            Financial Meltdown-Economic Pearl Harbour in September of 2008, even if the world does not recognize it as such,
            “They drank wine, and praised the gods of gold, and of silver,of brass, of iron, of wood, and
            of stone.”

            In other words, “It’s the Economy, Stupid!”

            The 3rd part of the Writing on the Wall tells of the decline of Babylon, the 1st Biblical
            model of the Nation reaching Imperial Military-Economic Superpower Status, and the rise of Persia.

            Ancient Babylon is now Iraq, and ancient Persia is now Iran.

            The US is the latest, greatest, of all the Nations reaching Imperial Military-Economic Superpower Status in the 2600 year old Biblical Babylonian superstructure.

            The TAIL struck the HEAD, invading Iraq in violation of International Law, causing the unravelling of the Earthly Babylonian superstructure/infrastructure, undermining the Global Order as represented by the United Nations since WWII, and ushering in the Law of the Jungle to the Middle East and this
            World.
            It also paved the way for increased Iranian influence in their own region of this world where the US is the interloper.

            The Iranian Revolution happened in 1979, 2-1/2 years after the Public Historical Record in the 1976 Kansas City Times Timeline.

            All the chaos in the Middle East since then, including the WORLD WAR in Syria, is the consequence of the vain attempt to reverse that God ordained, repeat of History, as a SIGN of The Times for our Generations.

            The 2 original 1976 newspaper records, clips from ‘THE DAY AFTER’ Kansas City was
            incinerated in a Nuclear Holocaust, and much more not included in this comment can be examined by those who really want to know, by searching Google for ‘Signs of the Times ray joseph cormier.’ As for the rest, not my problem, worry or concern.

          • Ray I guess you mean well but you are quite disconnected. Have you read the Bible through since you were seven, you might understand it better now?

          • Don, I don’t think it’s an issue that I’m disconnected. I think it’s more of an issue you can’t connect the dots.

          • Apollos

            Ray, They are right in that there is something not right about your mindset and thought patterns. This type of thing happens when people become obsessed with a two track focus — one which praises their own spiritual prowess and the other that gives them the illusion that they have some miraculous insight into escatology and how all things are connected.

            Please understand that this knowledge has been given to no one as God does not desire to give it yet. Focus on your own repentence and humility and stay away from self agrandisment.

          • Apollos when you say ‘they’ you mean Don and you.

            You’re free to say what’s on your mind as I am, but you too are biased.

            Self-aggrandizement? That really shows you’re not interested in the Truth, but trolling.

            I challenge you to point out any self-aggrandizement my original comment that caused Don to write, “Dumb comment!!!. No mention of myself at all in the entire script!

            As to what The Kansas City Times published September 13, 1976 and on ALL SOULS DAY, November 2, and mentioned in my comment above, there is no self-aggrandizement.

            The entire Timeline can be verified by anyone who thinks, and actually takes the Time to connect the dots.

            Obviously, I, Ray Joseph Cormier, didn’t have the power to shape the subsequent World events to Generally unfold along the lines of The Kansas City Times articles 42 years ago, but God, who led me to Kansas City in the Spirit 0f ’76, does.

            What do you perceive as self-aggrandizement in what The Kansas City Times published?

            The 1983 ‘The Day After’ movie on Nuclear War between Russia and the US could have been made in any big American City, but the FACT is, it was made in Kansas City.
            It’s also a FACT at the end, the movie pauses at the very same picture frame The Kansas
            City Times chose for the ALL SOULS DAY record 7 years earlier.

            I had nothing to do with that.

            It’s also a FACT, I was in the compressed crowd of Republicans in the Lobby of the Crown Centre Hotel with thousands of Republicans looking up to the Secret Service restricted balcony with the Podium of the President set up as the President was expected to be standing there any minute.

            There was a band playing Paul McCartney & Wings ‘Let em in’ having the words,
            Someone’s knockin’ at the door
            Somebody’s ringin’ the bell
            Someone’s knockin’ at the door
            Somebody’s ringin’ the bell
            Do me a favor
            Open the door and let ’em in

            I don’t know what anyone else in the crowd was thinking, but God knows I was thinking of these words.
            Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me.
            To him that overcomes will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne.

            He that has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the churches.

            After that, the Hotel Manager spotted me in the crowd below and called me to come up to the balcony. He introduced me to Secret Service Agents who wanted to question me.

            For the previous 4 Days, I walked softly, carrying my big stick, and approached every Senator, Congressperson and Delegate talking in small groups within the larger group in the Hotel Lobby, simply saying, “Good Day. My name is Ray and I want to talk to you about some issues.”

            Without exception, they all dissolved and disappeared in the larger crowd. No one would talk with me. Naturally, I was disappointed.

            To my great wonder and surprise, instead of bringing me into some anteroom for questioning, they led me to stand at the President’s Podium and questioned me in view of the Republicans in the Lobby below, and the 3 TV Networks broadcasting live. Since I had shoulder length hair, beard, wearing my trademark #13 jersey, it was a Revolutionary image in the 1976 American Revolutionary year.

            Standing Face to Face with me a foot apart, after asking about a dozen questions, to my even greater surprise and wonder, the Secret Service Agent, looking me straight in the eye, then asked, “Are you Jesus Christ?”

            Having no illusions about that then, or now, in a nanosecond answered, “No!” The next question was, “Who are you then? A Prophet?”

            That’s just 1 scene in my Life since I came alive to God. Naturally, I would question God more?

            Fyi, since this was posted, “The 2 original 1976 newspaper records, clips from ‘THE DAY AFTER’ Kansas City was incinerated in a Nuclear Holocaust, and much more not included in this comment can be examined by those who really want to know, by searching Google for ‘Signs of the Times ray joseph cormier’ not one single person on this site did it.

            Son of man, speak to the children of your people, and say to them, When I bring the sword upon a land, if the people of the land take a man of their coasts, and set him for their watchman:
            If when he sees the sword come upon the land, he blow the trumpet, and warn the people;
            Then whosoever hears the sound of the trumpet, and does not take warning; if the sword come, and take him away, his blood shall be upon his own head.
            He heard the sound of the trumpet, and did not take warning; his blood shall be upon him. But he that takes warning shall deliver his soul.

            But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the trumpet, and the people be not warned; if the sword come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his
            iniquity; but his blood will I require at the watchman’s hand.

          • Today is the Commemoration of Armistice Day, November 11, 1918
            On Remembrance Day, 1985, in the presence of The Governor-General of Canada, The Prime Minister, other government Leaders, the Military, the Ambassadors of the Nations, and 25,000 People, the Spirit of these words were added after the moment of silence, and after all the
            Establishment religions prayed to God there should be no more war.
            During the silence as the wreaths were laid, everybody in person heard these deliberately slow spoken words:

            “Hear O people and Nations, even to the ends of the Earth, the Word of the LORD God, who is, and was, and is to come, The Almighty.
            The LORD has a controversy with the people.
            Do you do well to honour the dead, and yet, deny the God of the Living?
            Why do you follow the vain traditions of men, and make of no effect, the Principles of God?

            You come here for one hour, one day a year, in a great show of Public Patriotism, and then forgetting, go back to work and make the same careless mistakes made by the generations prior to the 1st and 2nd World Wars.

            Hitler is dead, but it’s his legacy that remains. A Soviet-American military-industrial complex consuming $trillions of dollars every year, holding the entire World hostage…………”

            “Hostage” was the last word said perched on a bus shelter roof, as police got up and grabbed the megaphone.

            I was arrested for ‘shouting, causing a disturbance,’ convicted and fined $250. I appealed without a
            lawyer to The Supreme Court of Canada.

            Anyone interested in knowing more, and reading the 1985 Newspaper reports, search Google for ‘The Declaration ray joseph cormier’

          • Apollos, my reply you has been deleted, so I will leave the Lord to deal with those who removed it.

            You got the email notice of my deleted reply. The Facts are not changed. God knows I answered you in plain, respectful language. So do the so called “Moderators/Censors.”

          • Apollos who are “They” when only you joined in with Don to challenge my POV?
            What is self-aggrandizement to you?

            Please point out any self-aggrandizement in my original comment that made Don reply with ” Dumb comment!!!” If he didn’t replied like he did, I would not have had anything to add to the discussion.

            Pointing out the 42 year Historical record published in The Kansas City Times in 1976, and what happened in the larger world subsequently, is Historical Fact. Anyone who can think and focus, upon investigation will see the larger World has unfolded along those 1976 lines.
            I make no claims for myself other than being a Messenger. The record is clear.

            I see self-aggrandizement in your reply though, “This type of thing happens when people become obsessed with a two track focus — one which praises their own spiritual prowess and the other that gives them the illusion that they have some miraculous insight into eschatology and how all things are connected.

            The perfect example of those words describing your assumed spiritual prowess is this presumption on your part: this knowledge has been given to no one as God does not desire to give it yet.

            How would you know that?

      • Sumerian King

        “Yes, that was their pay going on the Christian Crusades to wage War on the Muslims. They were able to rape and loot without punishment on the way to and back from the so called Holy Land.”

        In a way, I suppose. However, please be aware that the “Eastern Crusades” (as the Catholic Church calls them), were a relatively limited military response to over four-hundred years of Islamic aggression in the Near East and North Africa, including repeated attempts to violently breach the the borders of Christian Europe via Spain in the west and Constantinople in the east. (Not to mention, numerous sea-borne invasions across the Mediterranean, e.g., the Muslim conquests of Sicily and Southern Italy.)

        • The Islamic Ottoman Empire lasted longer than the Babylonian, Persian, Grecian, Roman, British and all other Empires, the US being the latest, greatest of them all, and also the shortest of all Empires.

          The Islamic Ottoman Empire was giving Jews refuge when European Christians Nations were persecuting them.

          • Sumerian King

            The Ottoman Empire also murdered 1.5 million Armenian Christians before its demise after WWI. Care to try again? We can go at this all day.

          • No dispute from me on that point of History. My comment just points out the Historical Fact the Ottoman Empire did last longer than all the others mentioned in my comment.

            The British did create all the royal Oil Dictatorial Sheikdoms in the Middle East to suit British interests with the demise of the Ottoman Empire after WWI.

          • Sumerian King

            Sure, this is true about the British, but what made you bring up the Ottomans? They weren’t even around during the First Crusade, although the newly-arrived, semi-converted Seljuks were (and, more than the Arabs, the primary miliray opponent of the Europeans).

            Also, as far as the Jews are concerned, it is an unfortunate fact of history that in times when they were persecuted in Christian Europe, they flourished in the Islamic world, and the times they were persecuted in the Islamic world they fared better in Europe. Such was the unfortunate lot for the post-Second Temple Jewish diasopra. Definitely a black stain on our history as Christians (and the West in general).

  • Janice Graham

    I can understand why their targeted students would not want to stay and “learn.” It’s quite clear from what she says that they’re trying to ram religion down everybody’s throats. That’s not education. It’s brainwashing.

    • jamamiss

      Whatever. They are helping. You aren’t.

    • Judy

      why do you resent so much that religion has help an enormous number of struggling people…AA is based on a higher power and the most successful group at helping alcoholics…Why does it bother you that for some people it is a great help? Hey if you want to believe duct tape and wd40 is going to save the world we r fine with it……why u need to attack others for helping, the answers are inside of U and not anybody elses problem….

    • Canuck Sailor

      Bigot much there Janice?

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Janice, I am the woman who wrote the article and I wanted to thank you for voicing your concern. I’m sorry that you feel the way you do, and please know that I will be praying for you. God bless you.

      • Janet Ferguson

        Thoughts & prayers do not work, apparently it has not helped the humans seeking a better life walking thousands if miles!

        • Jonathan Kavanagh

          Prayers may not work in your mind so lets make this a legal issue. If they do not follow the rule of law we have in place then they will be dealt with. Thats a fact.

    • Janet McMonagle

      Theres a multiplicity of missions and NGOs in Hnduras, providing needed services as the government does very little except take money for about 17 families on top. It is very much a way of life throughout the country. My son worked with a Catholic organization. In his in laws colonia, there are missions run by Mormons, Evangelical groups, and others.

      One thing any responsible mission or NGO does there is build a service that can be taken over by local people. THis happens a lot with children’s homes and schools. No mission or school that I have seen there is interested in cultivating dependency.

      The first time I visited Honduras, the customs agent asked if I was on a mission trip. It is that common. As I went through customs, I saw groups of Mennonites, and other groups that were obviously from churches or missions.

      BTW, Evangelicals now outnumber Catholics in Honduras.

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Dear Janet McMonagle: Thank you for taking the time to share your well-informed perspective, as it is very true what you say. Yes; our purpose as a responsible mission/NGO is to build a service that is mainly run by local people. At the Living Waters Ranch (where we live and serve) I am the only American as I serve alongside of an amazing team of 10+ Honduran Christians. We have intentionally designed our organization this way so that more jobs and opportunities to serve God in the workplace might open up for the Honduran people (however small of an impact that might make on the general population, as I know our influence is very limited). As you said, we are not interested in cultivating dependency but rather look to empower the local people with integral education paired with a desire to live for Christ and obey His Word. God bless you, and thank you for all that you and your family do in Jesus’ name.

    • Sh Ke Bob

      You nailed it, Janice. It’s also clear that the author is offended that the people she speaks of are rejecting her ideology and seeking a better life elsewhere, and for that the author apparently thinks these people are not worthy of help. Some Christian she is.

      • Janet Ferguson

        I agree – walking thousands of miles for a better life – she has not walked in their shoes and can not speak for them all. If the all mighty help them all!

        • Jennifer Zilly Canales

          Dear Janet: Thank you for reading the article and for taking the time to voice your opinion. You are right — I have not walked in the shoes of every Honduran and cannot speak for them all. Pray with us that God might help each of us (Hondurans and Americans) to receive His perfect wisdom in order to understand the depth and intricacies of this situation in a right light. I apologize if the article offended you; that was not my intention. God bless you and your family.

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Dear Sh Ke Bob: Thank you for taking the time to read my article and then commenting your honest thoughts afterwards. You mentioned that I am offended by the Hondurans who reject our ideology in order to seek a better life elsewhere — rather than being offended, I am greatly saddened because I see that it brings about great suffering. I personally know several Honduran people (teenagers and adults) who were abandoned by their mothers at a very early age as their parents left them behind in order to migrate illegally to the United States. Even years (sometimes decades) later, this lack of parental involvement still causes them great pain. This type of abandonment can oftentimes be a real consequence experienced by many whose parents move to the States seeking a better life (although I know that there are many families who likewise do not abandon their children but take them to the States with them). You also mentioned that I believe the Honduran people are not worthy of help — I’m very sorry that I did not communicate this well or that my viewpoint was mis-interpreted as I do, in fact, believe the Honduran people are completely worthy of God’s love, our daily attention and service (although there are cases — at least in our immediate area — in which certain people do not want to receive help, guidance, education, etc and prefer to choose a purposeless and even dangerous way of life.) I enjoy serving Christ in the midst of the Honduran people and have been greatly encouraged and instructed by many of them. Please forgive me for any points in the article that were not clearly communicated or that were taken in a very negative light, and thank you again for sharing your thoughts. God bless you.

  • Judy

    Thank you for your informative caring assessment of the situation….

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      You’re welcome! God bless you, Judy.

  • rphunter

    It is sad that they people seem to find it easier to walk thousands of miles, rather than band together and fight for THEIR COUNTRY. Think of the good they could do if they stood and fought against the gangs, and the corruption, and insisted on a better life, in their home country.

    • disqusjen

      She says in her article they’re not the type to band together for their country. They weren’t interested in staying in school, they just wanted to get out. In fact they are the type that join gangs. Ms-13 comes from Honduras.

      • Mom H

        MS-13 originated in Los Angeles, California, in the 1980s. Most members are of El Salvador origin, principally.

      • Janet McMonagle

        Many of my son’s students faced forced recruitment, as young as 10 years old. It isnt a question of banding together at all. Kind of hard to say no when they catch you coming home from school, just being a kid, and they want you to do something or they’ll rape your sister. That is a pretty common experience in many parts of Honduras, where as the author says, the police do not respond. They don’t interfere with the gangs unless it makes the politicians look good – and many politicians have connections to organized crime.

    • Janet McMonagle

      I do know people who are doing that. Their lives are at risk. Google Berta Caceres. And we helped enable that.

  • Lisa

    This is one of the best articles I’ve read on the caravan crisis. Thank you to The Stream for publishing it.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Thank you for your positive comments and encouragement, Lisa. God bless you.

  • MV Cindy

    Is there anyway to donate to help this woman in her mission?

  • Diogenes71

    Having lived in Honduras, I recognize the problems and they are endemic, continuous, and seem to have gotten worse. The military essentially run the country and will not surrender its power to anyone.

    The country can be turned around in about a generation with the cooperation of the United States and its insistence on the concept of private property. The government does not defend individual rights and the right to private property is the foundation for the building of wealth.

    This woman is doing great work, but more needs to be done at a higher level. The rot is at the top of the government, the heads of the various departmentos (states) and the cities and villages.

    A positive outside influence can turn the whole thing around – eventually. But it has been going on for almost 100 years.

    Everybody above preys on those down below.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Diogenes71: You’re spot-on. Thank you for contributing your perspective on the situation. God bless you!

      • Diogenes71

        I lived in Nueva Ocotepeque and saw one young temporary military commander really try to help the people. He had been educuated in the US at West Point, no less. When the commandante returned he reversed all the improvements and freedoms and re-imposed what was essentially military rule. He even ripped up the cal (lime) the other commander had put on the streets to make them less dusty.
        There was a saying: Honduras is 70% illiterate, 70% illegitimate, and the 70s (1970s) will not change things one bit.
        God bless you and your work, too!

  • Lisa Kidwell Britt

    Very well written and I really appreciate your perspective ..it is horrific and it wont end well this is so so sad

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Thank you, Lisa! God bless you and your family. Please pray with us for God’s will to be done in Honduras.

  • deplorableme

    I understand the desire to improve ones lot – and charity. The breaking of laws, attacking police, destroying border fences all while waiving of the Honduras flag on foreign soil, demanding things, contradicts at so many levels.

  • Jenny Hill

    Great article.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Thank you, Jenny Hill. God bless you, and please pray with us that God’s Word might be proclaimed with love both in the USA and in Honduras regardless of the present circumstances.

  • Jennifer, I don’t know how or why, but your reply to mine disappeared from this conversation downstream

    Jennifer Zilly Canales > Ray Joseph Cormier
    Dear Ray Joseph Cormier: Thank you for sharing your perspective and for your commitment to living out God’s will as it is presented in the Bible. God bless you and your family.

  • Timebomb

    Here is the comment I’ve posted on Facebook regarding what is likely to happen when the caravan reaches the border. Not that I want this to happen, but to point out what could happen.

    Without a physical barrier to block the caravan flow across the border, 4-5 troops will likely be needed to wrestle, each man to the ground, and handcuff him like the police have to do to arrest some kinds of people without killing them. That could require 40-50,00 troops, not 14-15,000. Teasing doesn’t necessarily work to subdue some kinds of people. Otherwise, lots of them will try to break free and run.

    It would be a bit naïve, if not somewhat foolish, to believe they have not been instructed or even ‘coached’ to bust free and run, once they are across the border and into the U.S. You can ‘bet’ they are being coached and told that they will not be shot, and that not nearly enough male troops and border patrol officers are being sent to successfully wrestle, them all to the ground and handcuff them.

    Without such measures, once they get to the border, probably most of the younger males will have a ‘fighting chance’ to get into the U.S. The relatively few women and children will be distractions. Basically, all they have to do is keep on marching. Once they get in, they will disappear into the landscape, find their way to urban areas and be taken care of by the Democrats for voting in future elections – with no way to find and deport them.

    If that succeeds, there will be endless caravans until the U.S. as a sovereign nation is dissolved. Democrats leftist ideology is for there to be one world with no borders. And especially to dissolve the U.S. because in their view the existence of the U.S. is the true cause of the world’s problems, even before it was brought into existence by the Founding fathers.

    • Right on, Time!!!!!!

    • bj Antigua

      Trump just said that any illegal migrants coming through the border will not , NOT, be considered for any kind of amnesty. No 45 days with a child etc. They will be apprehended and sent immediately back, and will NEVER be allowed back into the States.The 15000 troops are down at the border building BaRRIERS. Not a wall, but very substantial. Amnesty applications will only be allowed at the port locations, to divert from the massive illegal activity at the main crossing. Drugs, trafficked people, kids, body parts, cash, and terrorists pass through all the time.This will stop as the wall continues to go up. Also, the use of a sound cannon is being prepared for, a very effective weapon that is harmless on any permanent basis. Then there are rubber bullets and the microwave gun that blasts a microwave that cooks the water just under the skin. Not permanently damaging but its like having your skin on fire if you linger.

      • Timebomb

        Thanks for the updated information. The high-tech new-age-harmless weapons are fascinating to ponder and think about the possibilities requiring employment of them. I didn’t preciously know of the sound cannon and the microwave gun.
        We’ll hear about whatever is happening when it happens via all the mainstream leftist major media outlets, no doubt. Of course any children and women being caused any discomfort by these will be made a ‘big deal’ of. Never mind the rigors of the long march they have undertaken however.
        Dispersing the Caravan and driving the people in it away without permanent harm should weaken the claim that Trump is ‘a really heartless, cruel, bad guy’ for not letting them come marching right on into the U.S. to receive asylum and be immediately put on welfare at taxpayers’ expense. Taxpayers include also lots of people who studied for years and worked hard to become productive legal immigrants.

  • While this definitely gives a perspective that is closer than most will ever get, it’s limited to you/your family’s personal experience in a specific area, which seems to be fairly isolated from everything going on. Not to mention that without TV/Internet at home you are at least somewhat shielded from the realities of how bad things really are in Honduras overall.

    At first, your seem to recognize the serious, extreme hardships and violence many Hondurans endure at the hands of government officials and gangs, but then you reserve the bulk of your judgement for those who haven’t “dignified” themselves enough to live an “honest life” in the midst of violence and poverty.

    You go on to place your judgment on the children who didn’t stay in school, and their parents. These children and their families are surrounded by God only knows what kind of violence in their communities on a daily, ongoing basis. After having been there about 5 years, it seems, you/your family have experienced the murder of your brother in law, the kidnapping and beating of your husband, and the killing of your cows. All terrible incidents, but you must have some significant resources at your disposal in order to maintain a home, school, staff.students and the overall safety of all of this for the most part. Families living in complete poverty with government officials and gangs breathing down their backs, beating and killing them alongside a missionary family with a secure, thriving school and staff who can more easily overcome such situations are not really fair comparisons.

    One can understand why some children/parents may be unwilling/unable to conform to the school’s requirements (whether it be academically, religiously or culturally). Look at how many kids historically in the US fail or quit without anything near these circumstances. There may be much lacking in the realm of therapy and counseling Honduran children would need in order to cope, let alone concentrate on school and religion.

    I imagine those most directly impacted by what’s going on in Honduras would read this and wonder how you could be in the midst of all that, see the kids/families who suffer through it, yet still be lacking a huge amount of empathy.

    RAICES is a non-profit organization that’s on the front lines of this issue – working to make sure those seeking asylum understand their rights and receive fair treatment. They recognize that there are those that may not have a strong enough case to gain asylum. That happens, but it doesn’t mean that the others are any less in need of asylum.

    Notice how silent the media has become on this issue now that the midterms are over, though. :/

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Dana Renee’: Thank you so much for reading the article and for posting your sincere comments. Yes; the article is limited to our personal experience in a specific area, although we are not entirely isolated from what is going on as we’ve seen first-hand much of the frenzy and its aftermath (broken families, abandoned children, etc), both caused by the current caravan and by prior illegal immigrations. I’m sad that I did not communicate my empathy for the Honduran people very well; I love the people of this nation and I enjoy living alongside of them everyday. They are my friends and my family. We have many very hard-working, thriving students in our school, but it is also true that many of those who have dropped out have done so not because they have been threatened by gangs or government officials but simply because they have chosen the path of least resistance (even when offered help to purchase notebooks and other school supplies.) This, too, is limited to our personal experience and might not be the case all around the country. As a final point just to clarify any potential misunderstandings, the violent crimes we’ve faced that you accurately mentioned in your comment were not alleviated or resolved in any way by the financial posture we hold by running a school (which is not secure physically or financially as we are able to do only because people believe in this mission and provide the funds to allow this very small work to continue onward.) Thank you again for sharing your very thoughtful perspective, and God bless you. Please pray with us that whatever changes need to be brought about in accordance with God’s will would be done, both in this country and in the United States.

      • Now that is a wonderful even handed well reasoned response to a somewhat provoking comment. Thank you Jennifer for all your encouraging follow up comments. You are obviously a thoughtful sincere concerned person. I sent your good article to a family member who immediately posted it to face book.

        • Jennifer Zilly Canales

          Thank you for your kind observation, Don Spilman, and God bless you. Let us do our best to build one another up in love and truth, and let us put into action every one of Jesus’ teachings. Amen!

          • LLZ

            I will stand with you as well, in this petition to the Lord, that whatever changes need to be brought about in accordance with God’s will would be done, both in this country and in the United States. I will add to that-may He turn the hearts of those with ill intentions and lead them to Jesus rather. I pray he blesses you and yours too Jennifer. Please take good care and i hope to read from you again.

      • CRBG

        Dear Jennifer: You communicated your “empathy for the Honduran people very well”; in fact, your article explains exactly why it’s so difficult (and sometimes dangerous) to live in Honduras and why so many people want to move. But your observations about these conditions can be applied to the rest of the Third World.

        In fact, as an immigrant to Canada from a Third World country myself, and one who has gone through the legal channels (which took years), I’d want to leave Honduras, too, but I would never ever try to enter another country by simply bypassing that country’s legal processes and showing up at the border, hoping for pity. It’s dangerous, violates the integrity of the process, is unfair to the millions of legal immigrants who apply via embassies, and is just not dignified.

        I second Don Spilman’s comment: Your response to Ms. Renee’ is even-handed, reasonable, and civil. Thank you for your perspective and for your clear, empathetic writing.

        • Jennifer Zilly Canales

          Dear CRBG: Thank you so much for reading the article and taking the time to comment. You are absolutely right; many (possibly all) of the details I mentioned about the harshness of life in Honduras could also be applied to other third world countries.

          That is part of the point I hoped to make (although I don’t know if I made it well): Can the USA receive all of the people in poor/less-than-desirable conditions from all countries around the globe? Obviously not, thus the answer to the problem at hand is not to receive the few but rather to band together internationally (if possible) to find long-term solutions on Honduran soil and — for those of us in Honduras or any other third world country (or any country, regardless of poverty and violence) — to seek Christ right where we are and not expect the government necessarily to change. This is hard to think about because we long to see positive changes here on earth and even pray that God might grant our government leaders wisdom, repentance, etc in order to govern in accordance with God’s Word, but we must also understand that when Jesus walked the earth many Jews expected him to liberate them politically from the Romans, but the liberation/salvation that He brought to humanity was much different (and much greater: the forgiveness of sins, a transformed life and the promise of an eternity with God). In a nutshell, I feel that God is teaching me through all this that it is okay to share my opinion on this topic of the immigrant caravan, but ultimately I must seek His will even in the midst of potential suffering, political injustice, etc, because that is that way that Jesus lived on earth and we are to follow Him.

          In response to your comment regarding legal immigration, I am also totally in agreement. I legally migrated to Honduras, and the process drug on 3 years and 11 months with many set-backs and frustrations along the way (and I know that the migration process can take much longer in other cases). If anyone should migrate from any country for a legitimate reason, it must be done so legally (especially if that person claims to be a Christian, because God’s Word instructs us to obey established laws and do everything we can in order to live in peace with those around us). If someone is knocking down barricades or forsaking international laws, it is disrespectful and gives a bad testimony. Thank you for your wise input on the matter, and I salute you for having migrated legally.

          Thank you for your encouragement regarding my writing style and perspective, and God bless you.

        • RE comment: “violates the integrity of the process, is unfair to the millions of legal immigrants who apply via embassies, and is just not dignified.”

          Jesus: NIV Matthew 20:16 “So the last will be first, and the first will be last.”

          Christian: But Jesus, it violates the integrity of the process, is unfair to the millions, and is just not dignified.

          • MNIce

            Somebody’s taking that quote from Jesus out of context. He was pointing out that those who should have known what He was bringing to them because they were first to have the Scriptures would be last because they put their own pride and priorities above Him, but many common people and even Gentiles would come to the kingdom first even though they were the last to hear about it.

            There is also an implicit point about it being the right of the property owner to dispense with his property as he sees fit. A nation owns its borders and has the right to set its admission policies, and that certainly applies to the Kingdom of Heaven.

          • A sinner that can’t extend the mercy they received, and worse twisting the Bible to justify their sin, sad… I’ll pray for ya.

          • MNIce

            Look, man, I’m all for helping people. I’m not for helping them violate the duly passed laws of the land. It is not mercy to make a person comfortable in poverty, it is mercy to show them how to find his way out. Coming to the United States to live the same way only with taxpayer handouts (thanks for promoting that, Mr. Obama!) is only seeking comfortable poverty.

            If someone wants to work through the legal process, fine, he’s welcome. I’m all for improving our legal process; the red tape and long delays characteristic of the previous administrations are most unhelpful. Instead of self-righteously trying to lay guilt trips when someone points out the context of a Scripture passage, how about joining me in working for a more efficient legal immigration process?

          • Matthew 18:21-35 New International Version (NIV)
            The Parable of the Unmerciful Servant

            21 Then Peter came to Jesus and asked, “Lord, how many times shall I forgive my brother or sister who sins against me? Up to seven times?”

            22 Jesus answered, “I tell you, not seven times, but seventy-seven times.[a]

            23 “Therefore, the kingdom of heaven is like a king who wanted to settle accounts with his servants. 24 As he began the settlement, a man who owed him ten thousand bags of gold[b] was brought to him. 25 Since he was not able to pay, the master ordered that he and his wife and his children and all that he had be sold to repay the debt.

            26 “At this the servant fell on his knees before him. ‘Be patient with me,’ he begged, ‘and I will pay back everything.’ 27 The servant’s master took pity on him, canceled the debt and let him go.

            28 “But when that servant went out, he found one of his fellow servants who owed him a hundred silver coins.[c] He grabbed him and began to choke him. ‘Pay back what you owe me!’ he demanded.

            29 “His fellow servant fell to his knees and begged him, ‘Be patient with me, and I will pay it back.’

            30 “But he refused. Instead, he went off and had the man thrown into prison until he could pay the debt. 31 When the other servants saw what had happened, they were outraged and went and told their master everything that had happened.

            32 “Then the master called the servant in. ‘You wicked servant,’ he said, ‘I canceled all that debt of yours because you begged me to. 33 Shouldn’t you have had mercy on your fellow servant just as I had on you?’ 34 In anger his master handed him over to the jailers to be tortured, until he should pay back all he owed.

            35 “This is how my heavenly Father will treat each of you unless you forgive your brother or sister from your heart.”

    • Faith

      I have just read your comment in response to the article and I have to say that I find the only “judgment” to be yours against the author. You seem to have an agenda and whatever does not suit that agenda you deem to be “judgment”. You dismiss the distressing experiences she and her family have lived through because you have decided they have more “resources”. I can tell you, as a person who has lived in poverty and out of it that “resources” don’t do a lot for heartache and injustice. And by the way “counseling” and “therapy” are examples of white middle class cultural colonialism in my book. The only empathy lacking is yours if you can’t see that people who refuse to make the decisions that will help them are culpable. It is only through taking responsibility that we are able to change our lives. Take away responsibility from people and you deprive them of their agency. Typical of those with an agenda.

    • Janet McMonagle

      Dana, are you in Honduras, or have you lived there? Just curious. I am familiar with RAICES but only in the USA.

      Jennifer’s experience and perspective is very similar to what my family and I have seen. My son worked there with NGOs for 3 years, and had significant volunteer experience in Northern Honduras prior to his moving there. He has since returned to the USA, and it took 15 months to get the visa to bring his wife and daughter legally, Of course whenever he has tried in the USA to speak of improving the legal immigration process, he is interrupted with comments about DACA, Sanctuary Cities, the Caravan, Asylum – and of course accusations of privilege. His response is that privilege didnt matter during the unrest after the election – it didnt keep his family safe, or enable deliveries of food and water. Privilege didnt make transportation through road blocks during a strike to a hospital that is of poor quality due to the robbery by the government of the IHSS system any easier when his daughter had a serious infection.

      During his time in Honduras, he worked with families who faced the choice to come to the USA without documentation. He taught their kids. He coordinated North American volunteers who taught their kids. Many of the kids had been victims of violent crime, and recruitment was daily – the gangs were outside the school and as this article reports, there was no police interest. The story Jennifer tells is pretty typical. Hondurans themselves call areas like this “lawless” – meaning that the police won’t come if you call them, and you are on your own with gangs. Consequently, anything that is done, from building a school, to owning a business, to farming your land has to be done in cooperation with gangs – either with protection, or an agreement to stay out of their way.

      He worked with parents to keep them from leaving in panic – saw some wonderful results from USAID assistance in local community programs which reclaimed communities and gave Hondurans a sense of community ownership. Has a friend who is a former gang member who tried to start alternatives, but is now in exile due to witnessing a murder. That friend taught with him for a while. For all the teachers, any time a student did not return because a family decided to leave on this dangerous trip, it felt like a kick in the gut. Many of the people do not understand the difference between the so called “american dream” which when expressed by them is really an illusion – and real asylum necessity. He’s known some people who left for some pretty frivolous reasons too.

      My son lived for much of this time with his in laws in a small colonia near San Pedro Sula. They have no more means at their disposal to remain safe than the average person. Neither do the nuns who run the school where he worked have means of safety, other than the 12 foot iron gate topped by razorwire and monitored by parent volunteers and the custodian. His inlaws also are related to farmers in the mountains – not wealthy, very hard working, way of life, always defending their ownership of their own land.

      He met his wife while both were volunteering to build a school and they were housed at a children’s home he had previously helped build. That children’s home today has dormitories, a children’s library, and a bilingual school – all built with small donations and a lot of volunteer work. The children who live there are protected behind a similar gate as described above, with armed guards 24/7. Otherwise the facility – and the children- would be gone.

      My sons in laws stay – mostly for family reasons. They have experienced murder and violence and gangs breathing down their necks and all of it. Right now, they can stay. I do know full well how prevalent it is for many families who cannot just how commonplace the violence and economic robbery by the government is.

      What is your experience physically in Honduras? I am curious as to your perspective since you seem somewhat critical of someone with boots on the ground as having limited experience. Yet her experience mirrors ours, and the experience of others I know.

    • Janet McMonagle

      Dana, are you in Honduras, or have you lived there? Just curious. I am familiar with RAICES but only in the USA. I have visited Honduras on a number of occasions – not the touristy parts, but where family live and work and study.

      Jennifer’s experience and perspective is very similar to what my family and I have seen. My son worked there with NGOs for 3 years, and had significant volunteer experience in Northern Honduras prior to his moving there. He has since returned to the USA, and it took 15 months to get the visa to bring his wife and daughter legally, Of course whenever he has tried in the USA to speak of improving the legal immigration process, he is interrupted with comments about DACA, Sanctuary Cities, the Caravan, Asylum – and of course accusations of privilege. His response is that privilege didnt matter during the unrest after the election – it didnt keep his family safe, or enable deliveries of food and water. Privilege didnt make transportation through road blocks during a strike to a hospital that is of poor quality due to the robbery by the government of the IHSS system any easier when his daughter had a serious infection.

      During his time in Honduras, he worked with families who faced the choice to come to the USA without documentation. He taught their kids. He coordinated North American volunteers who taught their kids. Many of the kids had been victims of violent crime, and recruitment was daily – the gangs were outside the school and as this article reports, there was no police interest. The story Jennifer tells is pretty typical. Hondurans themselves call areas like this “lawless” – meaning that the police won’t come if you call them, and you are on your own with gangs. Consequently, anything that is done, from building a school, to owning a business, to farming your land has to be done in cooperation with gangs – either with protection, or an agreement to stay out of their way.

      He worked with parents to keep them from leaving in panic – saw some wonderful results from USAID assistance in local community programs which reclaimed communities and gave Hondurans a sense of community ownership. Has a friend who is a former gang member who tried to start alternatives, but is now in exile due to witnessing a murder. That friend taught with him for a while. For all the teachers, any time a student did not return because a family decided to leave on this dangerous trip, it felt like a kick in the gut. Many of the people do not understand the difference between the so called “american dream” which when expressed by them is really an illusion – and real asylum necessity. He’s known some people who left for some pretty frivolous reasons too.

      My son lived for much of this time with his in laws in a small colonia near San Pedro Sula. They have no more means at their disposal to remain safe than the average person. Neither do the nuns who run the school where he worked have means of safety, other than the 12 foot iron gate topped by razorwire and monitored by parent volunteers and the custodian. His inlaws also are related to farmers in the mountains – not wealthy, very hard working, way of life, always defending their ownership of their own land.

      He met his wife while both were volunteering to build a school and they were housed at a children’s home he had previously helped build. That children’s home today has dormitories, a children’s library, and a bilingual school – all built with small donations and a lot of volunteer work. The children who live there are protected behind a similar gate as described above, with armed guards 24/7. Otherwise the facility – and the children- would be gone.

      My son’s in laws stay – mostly for family reasons. They have experienced murder and violence and gangs breathing down their necks and all of it. Right now, they can stay. I do know full well how prevalent it is for many families who cannot just how commonplace the violence and economic robbery by the government is.

      What is your experience physically in Honduras? I am curious as to your perspective since you seem somewhat critical of someone with boots on the ground as having limited experience. Yet her experience mirrors ours, and the experience of others I know.

    • Marie Evans

      They have no rights because asylum is for people who are persecuted not the poor and since they were offered asylum in Mexico and refused it they don’t have a right to our society!

    • sunlemming

      it’s difficult to read your criticism of people pouring out their lives for Hondurans and negate their firsthand compassion and consensus of a difficult situation. every nation is unique but the lack of desire to improve their lives is a very disturbing facet of Honduran youth. perhaps this is poverty fatigue but more likely collusion with lawlessness. also, this is clearly not grounds for asylum. do-gooders from afar make people sigh. RAICES sounds political to me and, as such, of little, longterm value.

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Dear sunlemming: Thank you so much for reading the article and for taking the time to share your thoughts. Yes; it is very disturbing to see (at least in our immediate surroundings) dozens of youth who simply don’t desire to improve their lives, study, work or take advantage of healthy opportunities. Thank you for understanding that that was one of the points I had hoped to share through the article. There is much lawlessness in our area, and we are very saddened that many bright, capable young men and women are denying the open doors offered them and instead are choosing purposeless and even dangerous ways of life. God bless you, and please pray with us for these youth, that God might fill them with His wisdom so that they might want to live clean, productive lives in His light.

    • It is folly to dismiss the observations of someone who has lived in a country and culture for over 5 years because her observations are “limited to you/your family’s personal experience in a specific area” but to uncritically accept the observations of journalists parachuting in for an event.

  • Jay

    I am here in front he USA and come down to Honduras every year on mission trip. I personally talked a Honduran friend, he has 3 boys. I had heard he was going to make a run by himself a few years ago, his second time. I convinced him to stay. I asked him if he would have his boys try it. He said no. The conversation turned to supporting his family no, moral support. He understood. Because of his decision I personally sponsor 2 of his boys in school. I occasionally get photos of their progress. I see their report cards, I get to talk to them over the internet. They are happy now and getting by as has been explained in your story. They participate in church. The family has made the correct decision for the family.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Jay: Thank you for sharing your perspective and for supporting a Honduran family so that their children might be educated and live a peaceful life. Thank you for that act of generosity and for your commitment; please also pray with us that real change might be brought about from the top-down so that justice, freedom from fear and real peace might abound on Honduran soil. God bless you.

    • LLZ

      God bless you and keep you. 🙂

    • Marie Evans

      I love education but education alone doesn’t make a person moral. The problems in Honduras is more than them being poor the country is ethically bankrupt. Until you solve this nothing else matters what will they become of the ruling corrupt too?

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Dear Marie Evans: Thank you so much for reading the article and for leaving your comments. You are absolutely right; education alone doesn’t make a person moral. We can see great examples of this all throughout the world (in any given country): many people have very high levels of education and even “success” but are depraved, chained to numerous addictions, have failing relationships, lie, etc. (That is exactly why in our school academics are important, but even more than that we desire to instill in our students the fear of the Lord, knowledge of His Word, a dogged discipline and work ethic, love of one’s neighbor, the desire to live Christ’s teachings and service to the local community.) Education without Christ only creates lost people who are slightly more sophisticated and shiny than the average prostitute, thief, etc. God bless you!

    • AllNotWell

      Perfect. You are helping at the right level of support. If all those liberals would adopt a family and stop sending money to governmental officials who abuse it and do not help their constituents, the country could recover and be prosperous. We cannot take in these people who are only looking for handouts either. If they stayed and worked in their country they would have a better life for themselves and their families eventually too like our pioneers of old.

    • ansonia

      Which also means that if his boys come here legally later, they’ll come here with more education.

  • retnavhmc

    “They were given open doors and even when they were pleaded to walk through them, they decided not to.”… Yup. Sounds like another 7000 Democrat voters for certain.

  • Jesus is my friend

    Hello I am from US and yes, we should let them stay in Honduras. We do not want them like we do not want murderers and rapists in our country. President Donald Trump is correct in saying that it will erode the culture of our country. So what if Honduras is poor and there is a bad education and there is crime? Honduras is the country they were born in and they have to bear the consequences. They do not deserve our better education system. Nothing is as great as America and we don’t want corruption from Honduras here. God will help them and President Trump will help them in Honduras. If their future is not bright it is not the fault of America. Thank you for bringing them to light about how illegal immigration is bad for America, and how they should stick in their own country because we do not want their poverty and unhappiness. You should come back to USA, Americans should not be in Honduras.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear ‘Jesus is my friend’: Thank you for sharing your opinion on the matter and for supporting what I wrote in the article. I won’t be coming back to the USA because God has called me to live in Honduras, and I want to be obedient to that call. I do not believe myself to be greater or lesser than the Honduran people, as we have all been created in God’s image and can become heirs to the Kingdom if we believe in Christ. I now consider myself to be not explicitly American or Honduran, but rather a daughter of the God who is present in all countries and loves all of His redeemed people the same. God bless you and your family, and please pray with us for peaceful, God-honoring solutions during this time (for both countries).

    • Marie Evans

      I’ve always said that if you withhold the wealthy money in Honduras many things would change.

    • Anes11

      How fake can a post get?

  • ansonia

    What good can be brought about by extending help to a very small percentage? None, unless the small percentage is made up only of people whose lives are in danger. The good is you save the lives of those people. But, judging from what you’ve written, that percentage of the immigrants is very small. So it should be a very small number of people who get asylum due to emergency.

    God bless you for writing this. God bless you for what you’re doing to help your neighbors, people of Honduras.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear ansonia: Thank you for taking the time to read the article and then for sharing your comments. Thank you for your blessing, and please pray with us during this time that hearts (both on the government-level and those of individuals and families in both nations) might turn toward God through Christ in repentance and faith. No nation or political party will bring about heaven on earth; our only hope is in Christ to save us and transform our mind in the midst of these current times. God bless you and yours.

      • ansonia

        Thank you so much.

    • Marie Evans

      No one should received asylum since they turned it down in Mexico that is the law!

      • Jane

        Thank you! i going to say that, but didn’t want to get into an argument here. Not in the mood today.

  • Faustulus

    Blessed are the peacemakers, of whom this couple make two. The caravan will be deeply divisive here. What it should do is remind people in government, who clearly need reminding, that there is so much that this country, the wealthiest since time began, could be doing, and long since should have been doing, to help Hondurans (and others in our “back yard”) to make a go of their countries. In the past, the US supported the thugs who fostered the repressing and killing, that is now out of control. It would be relatively cheap for this country to do those things that can help Honduran society succeed. We have chosen, instead, to enrich the rich here, and to neglect our stewardship not only of our own country, but those who are very much in our “preserve” and have been since the Monroe Doctrine. The caravan? A small matter. It’s being a wake-up call? A big matter. But the chances of its happening are almost infinitesimal. That is sad for them. It is even sadder for us. We have a president (indeed, we have had a succession of presidents) who does nothing; and a Congress that believes we can build a wall, and indeed does already contribute to the building, if not of a physical wall, a mental wall, which is walling us off from our sense of responsibility. Again, blessings to this one couple. And shame on our administration(s) and the Congress.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Faustulus: Thank you so much for reading the article and for taking the time to comment. Thank you also for recognizing us as peacemakers, for that is what we desire to be in the Lord. Please pray with us during this time for all governments, individuals and families involved, that God’s will might be done and if any major decisions/changes can or should be made that nothing would stand in the way of that happening. God bless you.

    • sunlemming

      there are many here shouldering responsibility and helping in our American societial spheres and there are millions of dollars going to Honduras in aid, likely sucked up in graft by corrupt officials. truly the answer lies in not abandoning your responsibility to your own country but staying to work for its upbuilding. lawlessness never bears a good harvest.

    • smclindsey

      Faustulus, Mr. Trump is president of the United States, not Honduras. What do you think his “responsibility” to Honduras requires? Nothing. Historically, every city had a wall around it to protest it from evil people who would come in and destroy. The time has come for the United States to do the same. Those people are not coming here to help themselves, or anyone else, they are coming here to destroy and take whatever they can. They are funded by an evil man, George Soros, who openly says he wants to destroy our nation as he has other nations. No, the caravan is not a “small matter”.

  • Christine Davis

    Jennifer, are you part of an organization the accepts monthly charitable donations? We’ve donated to Gospel for Asia for about 16 years and I was searching yesterday for something similar for Central America.

  • Rodger Harrison

    Jennifer we are Paramedics For Children in Copan Ruinas, Honduras and like you I am married to a Honduran as well and we have children here too. You just told a very truthful and well written story and I could not agree with you more. We have been here in Honduras now for 22 years and we run a medical clinic for the poor treating about 800 patients per month. Keep up the good work and please send me a link to your website with contact information. Our website is http://www.pfci,org. Good luck.

  • BKGRMI

    Jennifer, thank you for your very well written article. I believe you have summed everything up well in your last paragraph as you state, “Honduras is in desperate need of reform and an effective judicial system as it is overwhelmingly true that injustice and violence reign.” Having spent close to 30 years doing ministry in various regions in Honduras, your comments are spot on. Corruption facilitates drug use/trafficking, violence, generational poverty and general lack of opportunity. It contributes to family breakdown and robs people of hope, opportunity and purpose. Many NGO’s throughout the country offer training and education to help people get ahead. There are some Hondurans who refuse these services and expectantly wait for handouts and do very little proactively to better themselves. On the other hand, many Hondurans can and do work very hard to sustain themselves and their families. We have completed various surveys in different parts of the country and generally speaking, those who have graduated high school earn more than those who haven’t. Our surveys revealed people drop out of school because kids don’t want to go, they need to work or teen pregnancy. Honduras is a beautiful country filled with wonderful people. Significant change needs to occur at all levels of government. Keep doing what your doing. I believe you are creating the next generation of servant leaders who will lead and govern Honduras

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear BKGRMI: Thank you so much for taking the time to read the article and then for sharing your extremely important and well-informed thoughts. Thank you. I’m very glad to hear that you (as someone who has lived and served in Honduras nearly 30 years) can confirm that our perspective is not far off from the reality most Honduras experience. Thank you also for your last line regarding your belief that we are creating the next generation of servant leaders who will lead and govern Honduras — that is, in fact, our goal (to raise up a servant-minded generation of Christian disciples who — on however small of a scale that might be — will deeply impact Honduras and its citizens with the gospel of Christ as they are ready and willing for any good work in Jesus’ name). Thank you for the work you do in Honduras, and God bless you. Let us continue to pray for this beautiful country, that God’s will might be done and that His Word might be proclaimed with great love.

  • jontrott

    This article – a horrific example of privilege blind to itself – contradicts every serious journalistic report on what is happening in Honduras. It is doubtless going to garner donations for the the author’s ministry. The paragraph on ‘rogue teens’ is a classic example of patriarchal faux benevolence and bigotry. The whole article is for #TrumpagelicalNation – it has not a shred of Christ in it.

    • RIMSPOKE

      PERHAPS YOU WOULD BETTER INFORMED BY LISTENING TO PEOPLE WHO
      LIVE THERE IN HONDURAS THAN TO “JOURNALISTS” WHO DO NOT .

    • AFB

      I wonder if you, sir, have you ever served in such a capacity as this lady and her family have? Have you ever taken in a foster child, denied yourself any of your privileges in order to provide basic necessities for others, or immersed yourself in someone else’s culture in an attempt to help them? Not one time did I hear her mention donations. Until you have suffered in an attempt to help others, I am not interested in your opinion!!! I have an adopted son from Guatemala and he was brought to this country by abiding by the proper laws, etc. I guess I suffer from “patriarchal faux benevolence and bigotry” as well.

      • jontrott

        I have lived in the inner city of Chicago for the past 41 years with a poverty-level income and involved in a quite large ministry/shelter to homeless children, women, and men. Not a brag. You asked, I answered. There is *always* more I can do.

        • AFB

          Fair enough, I respect your position. I disagree of your analysis of the article but respect your right to have it. Good luck with your continued involvement in the shelter.

          • Anes11

            Here is a quote from this fake Christian/social justice warrior on another thread.
            “White Christendom has given us Trump, a war on the poor, disenfranchisement of persons of color, and the wholesale assault on women.”
            The man is deranged.

          • Katie Lou

            Obama gave us Chicago. good grief. put the blame where it belongs.

          • Melissa Miller

            If you believe any part of Trump is Christian you need to check your head…all that man does is lie and to make things better for his family.

          • MNIce

            That’s a very judgmental comment. Can you provide proof that “all that man does is lie?” If you are sufficiently versed in Christianity to read another person’s heart and assess the truth of his confession, then you are certainly well versed in the following: “You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.” “Judge not, that you be not judged. For with whatever measure you judge, by the same measure you shall be judged.” Are you ready to have God judge you with the same standard you apply to President Trump?

            (Hint: only God can do judge hearts! We sinful humans can only know people by the results of their faith. I note that President Trump has been diligent to keep his promises as well as he is able given his position. This is famously rare among politicians.)

        • So are you the same Jon Trott that co-authored a book about Mike Warnke years ago? If so I expected better from you. Your earlier comments about the article were nasty and baseless.

        • LucyL

          Oh, where do you advise those poor people in Chicago emigrate to to escape the poverty and violence the Democrats have created for them?

    • Maybe you could travel down to Honduras and live there for 6 months so you can give us a first hand report instead of just being bigoted and biased against someone who actually lives there? How ’bout dat?

    • vive45

      ‘….patriarchal faux benevolence and bigotry’. That line discredits you.

      Let me guess, you’re a left wing Catholic.

      • jontrott

        “A left wing Catholic.” From a right wing Protestant, I guess that would be a twin evil? No, I am not Catholic.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear jontrott: Thank you so much for reading the article and for sharing your opinion. I’m very sorry if I offended you with our perspective; it was not my intention nor am I an official journalist with all the answers. The article is definitely limited to our experience in a very isolated location, and when I talked about the ‘rogue teens’ I simply wanted to share part of our frustration and sadness at the fact that many of the local youth whom we know and love (and with whom we have tried to share the gospel of Christ on a daily basis) have chosen a lifestyle that is dishonoring to God and one that does not help Honduras to prosper. Please forgive any and all comments that were taken in a negative light, and in the future (if I write again) I will try to include more of our faith in Christ, as He is our daily bread and our reason for doing what we’re doing. God bless you, and please pray with us for God’s will to be done both in the USA and in Honduras. Thank you again for sharing your honest thoughts.

      • DianaGL✓Redeemed

        A graceful reply to a definately nasty and evil comment. GOD is in control. Thank you.

      • Dierwolf

        Jennifer, pay this man no mind. We have here in the states a political sub-set we call a “Leftist”, they are deranged and have mental issues. You can show them proof positive of something and they will still to their dying breath deny it, there are some that with total conviction, will tell you that the “Holocaust” never happened that it was all made up. You are doing good work.

      • jontrott

        Jennifer, offending me isn’t the issue here. I’m not important. Who is important are the people who feel it necessary to march many hundreds of miles to escape danger for their families and themselves. I am sure you are, as a missionary, aware of the history of whiteness and western imperialism being exported via Christians missions. In recent decades some missions groups have worked hard at undermining that pernicious history. But what you have written here, though I’m sure sincerely felt, is expressed as someone *who knows better than the people themselves* what is “best for them.” And that’s a text book example of white patriarchy in action. I urge you to prayerfully consider that idea… that’s all I can do. And I will pray for you and your family who are, I’m sure, doing good work in many ways. I am not trying invalidate your entire outreach. But I am trying, probably without success if the other comments here are any indication, to awaken in you a sense of self-awareness that may be uncomfortable and even life-changing. I pray the same for myself… also a white male who despite my own service to Christ struggle to be more aware of “the other.” It is a journey more than a destination. God bless.

        • Jennifer Zilly Canales

          Dear jontrott: Thank you for your kind, reasonable follow-up. Your comments make a lot of sense, and rest assured that I have been carefully (and prayerfully) considering each of the criticisms I’ve received to see what, if anything, I can take from each one in order to improve as a person before the Lord. This is also the first time I’ve ever written an article for such a wide audience, and I think it has been a huge learning experience for me in what I can change/improve in any future writings.

          To explain one of your points/concerns further…I am married to a Honduran, and every person I serve alongside of in our mission is Honduran. We don’t receive short-term missions groups from the States nor are there any white Americans who are closely involved beyond my parents’ visit about once a year to see our family. I understand your comments and (like I already mentioned) am and will continue to seriously consider what I can take from them, but please also know that the opinions I elaborated in this article are wholly shared by the team of highly educated Hondurans whom I serve alongside of. They are flabbergasted that so many teens in our area have refused to study/work and prefer to be unproductive vagabonds, and they frequently say so and try to counsel the local youth to make better choices in accordance with God’s will. (I was very careful not to publish an article that would go against their opinions as native Hondurans who deeply care for these people and have been in the country much longer than I have.) All of them have read the article and were very pleased with the viewpoints put forth, although obviously not all Hondurans are in agreement nor do I have a vast network in the country in order to consult with the masses. My experience is very limited, but what was said in the article is upheld by many Hondurans, not only by me (a white person).

          Thank you for encouraging me on this journey toward deeper self-awareness, and I appreciate your prayers for us. God bless you, dear brother, and may the Lord make the seeds you plant blossom and grow in Jesus’ name.

        • smclindsey

          jontrott, you identify as a Christian, so you should realize that your remarks were hateful and self-serving. Christians, real Christians display love, not hate.

          • jontrott

            I believe you’ve twisted around the meanings of hate and love here. Paternalism in the name of white Christianity is hateful…. no matter how sincerely blind its holder is to that fact. Confronting it as a brother or sister in Christ is loving, no matter how painful. I don’t expect you to agree. The past few decades among white Evangelicals have taught me that, sadly.

    • NancyM

      This is a joke, right?

    • tomnewtn

      Just poking your head out of that self reinforcing bubble of shallow and unquestioned assumptions to exhibit the inherent sense of moral and intellectual superiority you were developed in there. That bubble where elitism is blind to itself, and makes the assumption that those outside your bubble are stupid, bad people.

      • Ginger Burnett

        Thank your for this comment. As a Christian I found the article very judgemental! As if this guy knows what is happening in every village and to everyone! Did his wife or daughter get raped? Has he had to pay so much “tax” that his family is starving? This was a political message if I ever hear one! Just a wolf’s message hiding in sheep’s clothing!

        • shawn.erpexp

          Tomnewtn was responding to Jontrott.

        • Laura

          Did you even read the article? It’s written by woman!

    • pma95

      And, you’re an idiot lefty that sees bad in every truth.

    • smclindsey

      You, are wrong, and you should apologize.

  • susanneB

    Jennifer, I appreciate your selfless dedication to the Honduras people. Thank you for sharing your insight and observation. I, for one, certainly welcome more articles regarding your mission and progress. God Bless

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Thank you, susanneB, for your kind words and willingness to read more. God bless you and your family.

  • GR Wise

    Interesting to get a viewpoint from where it all starts. If I may ask, where is your village? In the 80s we lived in Wampusirpi ministering to the Miskito Indians during the Sandanista war.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear GR Wise: Thank you for reading the article and taking the time to comment. We are located on the Northern Coast on the outskirts of La Ceiba. God bless you, and thank you for ministering in Wampusirpi during the war.

  • Ginger Burnett

    “It is true much corruption and violence abound….”, you lost your cows, wait till you lose a child or your “taxes” are such you can’t survive. You live your situation not the other 9 millions’ situation. I’m amazed having lived there that you can judge what ever other Honderan lives. Do you know what the gangs are doing to the women 150-200 miles from you? No you don’t. One voice, yours, does not determine the voices of all. Thanks for what you do for these children but I don’t respect you judging the circumstances of everyone else as if you know all personally! Not cool or Christian!

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Ginger: Thank you for taking the time to read the article and for sharing your opinion. Please forgive me as it was not my intention to judge what every other Honduran lives; I simply wanted to share my very limited (and probably very flawed) perspective. We not only lost our cows but I almost lost my husband as well, as the gang members were bent on killing him after several hours of severe beating (they had mistaken him for someone from an opposing gang). It was only by God’s grace that they let him loose and he was able to escape. It is not my purpose (nor is it within my capacity) to be the voice of all Hondurans, as I know that each person’s experience and opinion are different. Please pray with us for those in need and those suffering violence, both in Honduras and around the globe. God bless you.

    • Heather Mary Kell

      she wasn’t judging anyone, or saying she understood every single person’s perspective – she was saying her perspective and she lives there, so need to give her credit for her honesty. She is being very Christian

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Thank you, Heather Mary Kell, for understanding what I hoped to portray in the article. God bless you and your family.

  • rodolfo pacheco

    ..there are the results after 500 years of colonialism…..No culture, no education , total ignorance about they can expect arriving at the USA border….Is very easy talk when you belong to the first class world , about the people who born without any oportunity in their intire life , even more .:..their dream is became your servants …, wherever that happen ..Thats kind of sad….Years ago that was about the dream of revolution , now , there is no dream…, Born in the USA or not …thats the question..If you born in lationamerica , you have no choise how to live …just choice how to die…

    • Ron Smith

      Like the United States wasn’t a colony 500 years ago…….

    • USAmerican100

      Still better than the slavery and human sacrifice before Europeans arrived.

    • MNIce

      Blaming colonialism doesn’t solve the problems of crime, corruption and lazy or cowardly law enforcement officers. It is often said that all that is necessary for evil to thrive is for good people to do nothing. What are you doing to eliminate the evil in Honduras?

  • Elaine Magenheim

    Thank you for sharing. It’s helpful to hear what is really happening in Honduras.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Elaine Magenheim: Thank you for your kind comment, and please remember that what I wrote is limited to my firsthand experience as I know that not all Hondurans share my viewpoint. God bless you, and please pray with us that God’s will might be done in the USA and in Honduras and that hearts might turn in repentance to Him.

  • pma95

    It also costs 1/10th as much to live there than here. I’m sure professionals get along just fine.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear pma95: Thank you so much for reading the article and taking the time to write. It is actually untrue that the costs of living in Honduras are 1/10 of those in the USA. General grocery items here cost about the same (and in some cases slightly more) than they do in the United States and gas rates are about the same as are clothing, shoes, electronics, etc. What can tend to be a bit lower is the cost of housing, as many people live in much smaller (and occasionally less structurally sound) homes because their salary does not enable them to maintain a larger/nicer home. Thank you for voicing your opinion, and God bless you.

  • John Perry

    Sorry, I don’t want these people in the US, and I’m an immigrant. But I came to US legally, and these people need to get in line, and not bum rush our borders.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear John Perry: Thank you so much for reading the article and for taking the time to voice your concern as a legal immigrant. I am in agreement with you: whosoever should migrant (from any country and to any country) should do so legally, not in the manner that the current migrant caravan is doing it. Thank you for sharing your perspective, and God bless you. Please pray with us for both of these nations (USA and Honduras) during this time, that their leaders might receive wisdom from God in order to direct their respective countries in a way that is honoring to Him (and beneficial/safe for their citizens).

  • Raisa Berriz

    I think your normal is messed up. I now sympathize with those marchers more than I thought I would. I do not know how you can write this and expect others to believe that living there is anything short of horrific,

    • LucyL

      That is the very image of privilege and entitlement. Maybe you should ask your great grandparents what it was like during the Depression in the 30s.

      • Raisa Berriz

        Maybe you should understand that I am a refugee myself. I did come here legally. zI can also look at these people and their country and realize that there is no hope. Looking at it from a privileged Western perspective is impossible for them. They will not be able to make a difference in their lifetime. All they want is hope for a future where they don’t have to worry about death by murder or starvation for themselves and their children. And guess what? They are willing to work for it.

        • LucyL

          Their political affiliations post-immigration would indicate otherwise. The Cubans who immigrated here because they wanted not to worry about death by murder or starvation, and were willing to work for hope for their future don’t vote Democrat. The South Americans coming in have either been fed a pack of lies about the wonders of Democratic controlled gang infested American inner cities, or they are not doing what you think they are doing. Would you leave your children behind to escape murder and starvation?

    • Timebomb

      ‘Horrific’ is mostly mental. It’s surprising what kinds of conditions to which one can become accustomed, or gradually learn to adapt. By cushy, pampered U.S. standards, not having a TV or a smartphone is almost horrific, and yet they live in neighborhoods ruled by street gangs, where hip-hop misogynist culture and covering oneself with body piercings and tattoos is ‘cool’ etc.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Raisa Berriz: Thank you for reading the article and for sharing your comments. I absolutely agree with you that the Honduran “normal” can be very messed up (due to lack of police response, educational inefficacy in many institutions, corrupt government, etc); that is why in the concluding paragraphs I tried to state the fact that Honduras is in desperate need of wide-scale reform. If you would glance again at the last paragraph, I specifically share:

      “If the United States accepts the several thousand immigrants in the caravan, there are still over 9 million Hondurans living in what those who have fled claim to be unbearable circumstances on Honduran soil. What good can be brought about by extending help to a very small percentage who present themselves as refugees unless wide-scale change will be brought about by and for the masses who have stayed behind?”

      In my opinion (although I do not hold all the answers), it will do Honduras very little good to receive a few thousands migrants if the all-around situation in the country is not helped/improved drastically. I’m very sorry that the message of the article was misinterpreted, and I hope I was able to clarify through this response. God bless you, and please pray both for the migrants in the caravan and those of us who have stayed behind.

    • Melanie Maxwell

      I guess not having luxury items is horrific? What if everything you had was taken Away and all you had were the people you loved and a cinder bock house? No, not a horrific way to live, a simple way to live and if you have the Joy of the Lord in your heart it is all you need.

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Thank you, Melanie Maxwell, for sharing this perspective! I know many people do not agree with me, but it seems that in many ways in today’s world we have mixed Christianity (or dignity, etc) with materialism. Many dignified Christians (and people of other religions) all around the globe live in stark poverty — Jesus Himself was a materially poor man, and He came to show us the way to eternal life! He didn’t come to improve the people’s material/economic lot in life but rather to transform their mind/soul in order to have a real hope beyond those circumstances, knowing that He has overcome this world. (I think many people want to make the claim that if you don’t have every modern luxury you are being denied your rights or opportunities as a human being, but I just don’t see the wisdom in this stance. Today’s world is highly materialistic to such an extent that it will be impossible to maintain many ‘normal’ lifestyles over the coming years as natural resources are becoming increasingly scarce.) God bless you, and thank you again for sharing this insightful perspective. One can live in poverty with great dignity, joy and purpose! (…”The joy of the Lord in your heart is all you need…”)

  • Ron Smith

    What was the difference between the United States and Honduras in 1776? 1787? 1800? 1900? 1950? 2000? Stat at 1776 for your answer.

  • SS

    Your privilege is showing. You lived a life full of opportunity and luxury in the United States where you were given a wealth of opportunities and options these people have never had( like getting a college degree). You sit on your high horse and judge these people but you have never lived their experience. You may live in Honduras now and claim to have a simple life with no luxuries but you did not always live that way. That was your choice. You tell people to just sit back and accept the poverty, violence and corruption in the country because immigrating is “illegal.” Yet you propose no other solutions. How can you see people hurting for a better life and tell them they are wrong because “it’s not that bad”?

    • Mary Hasting

      So, your answer is to let thousands of people from Honduras ILLEGALLY come into our Country and turn our Country into what they came from instead of helping the other 9 million Hondurans who stayed home change their own Country into a civilized Country.

      • SS

        These people are not illegally coming to the US. They are applying for asylum. Do you know how someone applies for asylum? They show up at the border and apply. In regards to your comment about “turning our country into what they came from” I have no response other than to say you are making GROSS and RACIST assumptions about an ENTIRE COUNTRY full of people. Assumptions I’m sure you have founded not on the basis of fact or experience but on the fearmongering of your beloved president. Do you know anyone from Honduras? I highly doubt it or you wouldn’t make such sweeping statements. Also, are you aware of the amount of damage the United States and other colonial powers have done to Central America? We have involved ourselves in their politics time and time again in the name of “preserving democracy”, causing irreperable damage in the process. But now that all the damage is brought out into full force through corruption and violence we turn our backs on these people. Do some research and again, CHECK YOUR PRIVILEGE.

      • Phyllis Renee’ Arpin-Nelson

        That isn’t her premise at all. It is the opposite. she believes they should stay in Honduras and if they immigrate, they should do it lawfully.

        • shawn.erpexp

          Mary was responding to SS

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear SS: Thank you for reading the article and taking the time to share your thoughts. Yes; I come from a background of economic privilege and that is not something I can change. All I can determine are the decisions I now make day-to-day as an adult. You are right; I have never fully lived the average Honduran’s experience. What I am sad about is that the article was interpreted as me sitting on my high horse and judging Hondurans. I love the Honduran people — I am married to a Honduran, am parenting Honduran children, and all of my work relationships are with Hondurans (whom I deeply respect, learn from and enjoy serving alongside of). Please pray with us that the solutions to Honduras’ many problems might become clear to all government officials involved (even as they remain largely unclear to me) as oftentimes the answer to the myriad of issues can be hard to determine. It is easy to spot the problems but increasingly difficult to discover/implement solutions. What I do know is this: the answer for individual lives (in any country) is Christ, and due to the fact that your diagnosis of me is probably true that is exactly why I need His forgiveness, wisdom and indwelling life on a daily basis. God bless you.

      • SS

        This article is full of judgements about the youth of Honduras and their decisions, calling them “rogue teens” because their life choices are not under the umbrella of what you deem acceptable. You have lived a very different life full of privilege, not just economic, but white privilege as well. You are viewing their decisions through the lens of the colonizer, just as white Christians have done time and time again. The spiritual bypassing does not fool me. Hiding behind the guise of Christianity does not impress me. A true Christian does not judge, but loves and respects all individuals. “Let him who is without sin cast the first stone.” I pray that you may open your mind and gain the ability to see the Honduran experience through the eyes of the people who live there, through the lens of their culture.

      • smclindsey

        You do not come across as “better than them” Some people will criticize anyone and everyone.

    • childofjehovah

      you need to better comprehend what she was writing. she never claimed to be better, The whole point of the article was her trying to help the Honduran people better themselves and educate themselves to they could pull their country up and make it better. Them coming here helps nothing. We need to help educate the Honduran people so they can bring themselves up, which is what she is trying to do. that’s the whole point of the article.

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Dear childofjehovah: Thank you so much for reading the article and for taking the time to share your comments. Please accept my sincere gratitude for having understood the message I hoped to communicate. Thank you, and God bless you.

    • Exactly. Any person of color I know would read this and think the same. It comes across as judgmental of the people you serve. What you are doing for these people is awesome and I know it must be very hard work, but it is tainted by an attitude of superiority and lacking empathy. You really have to delve deeper to understand why some people cannot be successful in your school while others are not. The idea of them just passing up your gifts of time/resources simply cause they want an easier life is an extremely surface level view of the issues.

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Dear Dana Renee’ — Thank you first of all for commenting. It seems that many people think that I hold my opinion due to the fact that I’m a white American, but that is simply untrue. I am married to a Honduran and serve alongside of Hondurans every day who hold the exact same opinion I do. In fact, there are no other white people in our mission (except for a white-skinned Honduran, which many people in the States would think doesn’t exist) and we’ve intentionally designed our school/mission in such a way that we don’t receive short-term missions groups from the States in order to cultivate a more sincerely Honduran mission with Honduran perspectives (always within the context of the Christian faith).

        Those I work alongside of have even helped me to form my opinions, and they have all read this article and wholly support what I wrote. Many Hondurans (although obviously not all) think the migrant caravan is the wrong answer to the myriad of problems that Honduras faces, and those I serve alongside of (highly educated Honduran Christians whom I learn from every day) are very surprised and saddened by the large number of local youth in our area who have rejected offers to study in order to be vagabonds or get involved with lives of crime. This is not solely my opinion; it is that of many Hondurans as well.

        I respectfully hope to communicate to you that this is not my ‘whiteness’ talking, but rather I am voicing the opinions of several well-informed Hondurans. We are a team, and we are not judgmental of the people we serve but rather hope they would make better decisions for their own good and for the benefit of this nation (and some of them do; I believe I did wrong in highlighting those who make poor decisions more than the many thriving youth in our area who are making wonderful decisions and lead productive lives.) God bless you.

    • mike

      spoken like a true liberal ss

    • Melanie Maxwell

      You are sad sad sad. Maybe you would like to take some Honduras people into uour home. Until you have first hand knowledge, like this girl does, i suggest you sit down.

    • Christopher Lynn Park

      Did you read the part about her working at a ranch that provides education and the opportunities that come with it? If the students become educated, couldn’t that give them access to lawful immigration through tradeable knowledge and experience? Or do wealthy business barons and their government cronies need easily-bought loyalty votes from easily misled unskilled, uneducated people?

  • Mary Sweeney Laridaen

    Jennifer, as I understand this article, you are writing from your own personal experience of living amongst the people in Honduras, would I be correct in that?

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Yes; that is absolutely correct. My experience is very limited and does not represent that of all Hondurans. I’m not sure if I communicated the message accurately, but I hoped to convey that there are many crises in Honduras (both on the level of government and in individual lives) that make for a very complicated situation. I love the Honduran people but do not see that the migrant caravan (or any other illegal immigrations) will bring about any positive change for this nation. Please feel free to send me any further questions you might have. God bless you.

  • Gail Wyatt

    Not all Americans live in luxury only a small percentage. But we follow the laws, pay our taxes and shrug out a living. We as tax payers are tired of giving handouts to illegals when our own people are in need.. we have homeless people, many not by choice.. our vets suffer so much and yet no one helps them. Hondurans need to stay home; many of these people are violent and are breaking the laws and leaving behind trash. They still fly their countries flag and burn our American flag, we don’t want people like this.

  • Denis Kucharski

    Following the law is no sort of moral standard. Helping slaves escape used to be illegal, shielding Jews from the holocaust was illegal. Part of the reason that Honduras has a breakdown of law and order is due not to the moral failures of its people but due to the political corruption that was directly fostered by CIA interventions. The U.S. made the mess there, it has a moral duty to clean it up.

    • Frank Kenny

      Very interesting perspective Denis about it being illegal to do certain things that were morally correct but illegal. And you certainly are correct that the US govt is at least partially if not fully historically responsible for the failed policies that is creating these horrible conditions. Great points. Not sure we should welcome anyone that wants to cross the border though, just because I think everyone south of Texas May see it a complete open door policy and start just heading in without using the proper channels. But we certainly need good dialog and open minds to look at both sides and try to help anyone we can

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Very well-reasoned, kindly stated points! Thank you for contributing your two-cents. God bless you and your family.

    • childofjehovah

      So the soviet union and cuba had nothing to do with that right. No, they weren’t trying to create more satellite cubas…..not at all. CIA was just bored. If it weren’t for the Soviets and castro, the US would have never known the rest of the world existed. If stalin would not have been stalin and tried to take over the world, the US would have reverted back to our isolationist policy like we were riiight up until japan attacked us. Sure their country is a little tough off but at least they are not Venezuela……

      • Denis Kucharski

        In 2009 Hillary Clinton as Sec. of State ordered the CIA to support a coup. That coup caused political instability. Since the Soviet Union has been dissolved since 1991, the answer is definitely not. Cuba has stopped its support of regime change activities for the last 30 years. If you don’t believe me, look it up yourself.

    • smclindsey

      Blame the US. That’s just stupid.

      • Salvador Torres

        Well, there are 2 US military bases in Honduras. (There was 12 bases in the 80’s) The US pays no rent or any taxes. They imposed a coup in 2009, also, they helped the military right wing dictator to re-elect himself even though was illegal.

    • Denis Kucharski

      Hillary Clinton as Sec. of State ordered the CIA to foment a coup in Honduras in 2009. This is when their political situation turned for the worse. Look it up. She and Obama did the same thing in Libya. Now there is anarchy there and public slave trading auctions. So yes, the U.S. is responsible for the havoc.

      • JohnChristie

        Things done with good intent but have had terrible results.

    • skyway1234

      Helping slaves escape used to be illegal – until the Abolitionists, who became the Republicans, fought to set slaves free. Shielding Jews from the holocaust was not illegal in the United States. Let’s stick to the US, shall we? The CIA are not “The Law,” rather they are an intelligence agency. They are not a law enforcement agency. I used to be married to a Guatemalan man and he was a Marxist who constantly hammered against the United States. Everything was the fault of the US. Well, if you are a communist, then everything is the fault of the United States. I don’t think the occurrences that caused massive problems in Honduras can be laid at the feet of the US.

      For one thing, an enormous problem that people in the US don’t want to examine is the problem of substance abuse. We have 22 MILLION heroin addicts in the US, 60 million alcoholics, 70 million pill addicts, 50 million problem pot smokers, and 15 million “other” drug addicts – what could go wrong? We have a porous border and southern neighbors who refuse to respect that border, which doesn’t help either side. There are billions of dollars being made from drug, human and sex trafficking, and a Deep State group that are blocking our country from being able to establish a border policy that keeps people out who are not legally entering.

      I believe that laws are written in order to keep our society in a somewhat functioning state in which we can live in peace. The further we pull away from law and order, the worse things become here in the US. Laws are not made to be broken. Anyone who thinks this way really needs their head examined. And by the way, anyone who wants a close up look at what happens when laws are rampantly broken should come out to California and see how we live here. People out pooping on your front lawn, older people being victimized, needles laying out on the grounds of the public parks, tens of billions of dollars spent each year on lawlessness. Try living in a place like San Francisco, where there is a poop map app so that you can maneuver your way around the city between the areas where 18,000 people have dumped right on the street. Those people believe it is hella groovy to break laws.

      • Moi

        Skyway1234. I live in the city of San Francisco. There is no poop app map that is functioning in SF; the last year of any data added to it was 2015, and it was a project done to draw attention to the issue of homelessness here. There are not 18,000 homeless people in SF; the number is more around 6,000-7000, a substantial number anyway. I also take issue with the numbers you cite regarding those addicted to drugs and general substance abuse in the US. I added up your numbers to get 217 million people in the US compromised by substance abuse. We are a country of around 350 million, so you are simply wrong. Law and order and a healthy population are undeniably important factors in a peaceful, successful society, however your points are so exaggerated that how can a rational reader take you seriously?. Be more methodical in your comments.

        • skyway1234

          My response to you, with links to back up my assertions about feces on the streets of San Francisco, is being held up for approval by this website, but here is part of what I copied and pasted:

          From a 2018 SFGate article “20 pounds Human Feces Dumped on SF Street Corner:”
          “Complaints about human waste around San Francisco increased by 400 percent from 2008 to 2018, according to 311. There were more than 21,000 reports made to 311 in 2017 alone. (Note: Some of the increase is likely due to more people using 311 when it became accessible through an app in 2013.) The waste is largely linked to the thousands of people living in the city without housing and without access to public restrooms.”

          You see, Moi, San Francisco and San Jose “bum bombed” the small Northern California town I live in by giving them $25 and a bus ticket to our town one way. Now WE have people pooping out on our lawns. See how that works? You take the problem your city has and instead of solving the problem, your city relieves itself by forcing the problem out to some small town that doesn’t have the funding to deal with the problem. In other words, YOUR problem became OUR problem when the homeless were forced out in the run up to the Super Bowl in San Jose a few years back.

          • Moi

            Howdy Skyway1234. Yes, there is human feces on the sidewalks of San Francisco, I did not deny that. I denied the app being current. I live here. I know what is happening. By the way, there is a deep tone of resentment in your comment above, seems like you have a lot of blame to throw. In actuality, the issue of homelessness is “our” problem as a nation, not just San Francisco, nor San Jose, nor your town, but Every Town, USA.

        • skyway1234

          There are not 217 million addicts in the US – there are 130 million. The numbers I gave you are accurate. We have 22 million heroin addicts alone. When you take the number of people who are alcoholics and also smoke pot, or the meth addicts who also smoke pot, or the potheads who also drink and do meth – well, you get the idea. They are cross pollinated. What is really wonderful about the number of addicts in this country is that 1) nobody is doing anything about it except to make this huge problem legal and 2) the liberals are fighting, fighting, fighting to keep our borders open, to legalize more and more drugs, and to make it harder and harder to combat the problem. But…people who get high also vote, so what can we do?

  • Frank Kenny

    Great article Jennifer. I lived in Honduras for 12 years and still have a house and business there. Now we live back and forth to Honduras. You absolutely hit the nail in the head. Please don’t take any of this criticism in the comments too harshly. You are doing some great work there and you should be commended for that and you certainly have earned your right to speak your opinion on your point of view. Nothing in your article was derogatory or anything but intelligently insightful. Good work! I lived in San Pedro Sula.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Frank Kenny: Thank you for your encouragement and insight as someone who knows Honduras well. God bless you, and thank you again for seeking to build others up. Thank you!

  • What do you suggest, other than the implied solution of letting them die at the border?

    • Unbelievable

      I guess they could always take Mexico up on their offer. Or maybe they could live with you?

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Ed Darrell, I’m very glad you voiced your concern, as I hope to clear up any misconceptions: I did not suggest (nor imply) that those in the migrant caravan should be left to die at the border.

      Rather than looking explicitly at the caravan (of which I only have close-up knowledge when it took off from our area, but obviously have no way of having a first-hand account now that it has passed through Guatemala and Mexico while I remain behind in Honduras), I hoped my writing would help shed a bit of light on some of the root causes which provoked/enabled the caravan that might too easily go overlooked — rampant, unpunished violence in Honduras (which I tried to explain in depth in the article); an apathetic attitude that some (but not all) have in regards to work/study; and other factors that were not within my grasp to cover in the article.

      In my opinion it is a combination of lawlessness (the Honduran authorities need to better exemplify and enforce established laws in order to create a more stable/safe society in which people want to stay and prosper) plus the fact that children/youth decide whether or not to go to school (meaning that many — even those who have the resources and the open doors to educate themselves — can prefer to remain uneducated and possibly become engaged with criminal groups without any consequences.)

      Just recently a 16-year-old teen in 8th grade in our school dropped out because she didn’t want to study (even having the opportunity and financial capacity to switch to the much easier, local public high school if she didn’t like the rigorousness of our program), and now she has run away from her aunt and uncle’s home (where she grew up because her parents left her behind to move illegally to the States when she was a toddler) and is now living in a marital-type relationship with an adult man. This is so often what happens when teenagers (probably in any country) drop out of school; they have too much idle time and start to make poor decisions. This is what distresses me, as it creates a chain of suffering for current and future generations.

      There are so many other details to share, but it is my hope that you understand that I am not promoting the idea of letting the immigrants die (nor is it within my expertise to diagnose exactly what should be done with them). What I am interested in and trying to fight for is endemic, long-term change on Honduran soil that will benefit the masses, otherwise I sense that many more caravans will be formed in years to come without ever really solving the root problems at hand. God bless you.

      • Again, you gave reasons, but no solutions. I’m curious why you keep framing it as an “illegal caravan” in your piece? You’ve effectively demonized them while positioning yourself and others who have stayed in a community/country that you’ve admitted is unstable and dangerous, as the good/honest ones. What good does the caravan do for those who stayed behind? Nothing. You are also free to leave. For you to judge why anybody leaves given your own description of the country seems disingenuous.

        • Jennifer Zilly Canales

          Dear Ryan Haack: Thank you for reading the article and taking the time to share your comments/questions. I will try to answer/commentate on what you posted…

          I framed it as an “illegal caravan” because the migrants did not follow proper border protocols as they passed into Guatemala and Mexico. (There are numerous photos and eye-witness accounts of them pushing through barricades, climbing on roofs, disregarding policemen and jumping off the bridge over the Suchiate River in order to avoid having to cross the bridge legally.) This is obviously not something that I have seen personally because I do not live on the Honduran-Guatemalan or Guatemalan-Mexican border, but from the detailed research I’ve done online I can see and believe that they did not pass into those countries legally or civilly (at least a portion of them). Many of the young men masked their faces, and there has been a certain degree of violence involved in what they’ve done.

          I apologize for not having proposed solutions; I believe that is beyond the scope of the article and my own experience/expertise. I am not a politician or a foreign affairs specialist; I am a simple Christian missionary married to a Honduran and serving/teaching daily alongside the Honduran people within the scope of God’s will. It is hard to see political/practical solutions in the secular realm, and I simply desired to give an honest, first-hand perspective to those who live far geographically from Honduras and want to know a very small part of the daily Honduran existence. It is difficult here; there is a lot of violence (although it does not affect everyone personally, as many might believe); but there are also a lot of good, honest people who earnestly hope and pray for a healthier and safer nation (along with those who are not willing to work/study).

          You have excellent questions and concerns, and I’m sorry the article left you with a bad taste in your mouth. That was not my intent (to offend you, demonize or judge anyone, or to position myself as better than those who’ve left the country), and I hope you might be at peace with the response I am able to give you (although it is incomplete). God bless you, Ryan.

        • Jennifer Zilly Canales

          Dear Ryan Haack: I composed a long response to your post several minutes ago and thought I posted it, but now I don’t see it on here. I’m assuming something went wrong with the connection, so I will try again…

          Yes; thank you for posting your honest thoughts, questions and concerns. I am very sorry the article left you with a bad taste in your mouth, as that was not my intention (nor did I hope to judge/demonize anyone or position myself as being better than the people who left).

          I categorize the caravan as being largely illegal because many of the migrants did not respect border protocols entering into Guatemala and then into Mexico. There are too many photos that give proof to this — Hondurans storming/climbing over the border gate; Guatemalan police officers fleeing for fear of the aggression of the large group; many people jumping off the bridge over the Suchiate River and crossing into Mexico illegally rather than waiting in line and following protocols on the bridge. I obviously do not have personal experience of these events as I do not live on a border town, but I do feel that many aspects of the caravan have not been done in the best manner possible, and there have been several general international protocols that they have not proved interested in respecting/following.

          As to your point on the fact that I do not propose solutions, you are right. I am not a politician or foreign affairs specialist, and I believe that proposing any detailed political solution goes much beyond my experience/expertise. I am a simple Christian missionary married to a Honduran and committed before God to serving these people every day. It is oftentimes very hard for me to see solutions in the secular realm, and the scope of this article was simply to share our first-hand experiences (both good and bad) in Honduras.

          It is true that it is at times difficult to live here, but it is also true that there are many Hondurans who are not affected personally by the violence in the country. Not everyone is under a constant death threat; there are many who live honest, productive lives and are doing the best they can for their families and society (while it is also true that there are many who are corrupt, do not respect laws, do not want to work/study, etc). This is an extremely complicated issue, and I hoped to present that through my article (although I know I did so imperfectly). I hope that you might be at peace with my response and that you might pray that God would grant me more wisdom and even physical protection as I hope to continue living in Honduras for many years to come. God bless you.

  • Gabe

    Thank you so much for offering your honest and in-depth perspective on this issue. As someone who spent considerable time in Central America, I concur wholeheartedly with your assessment.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Gabe: Thank you for reading the article and contributing your perspective as someone who spent considerable time in Central America. God bless you!

  • Brett Michael Rader

    Let’s suppose the author is correct that they should just not come to the United States. I’ve been writing letter to my baseball team for years that they just need to all hit over .300, but they won’t listen.

    The fact is that any time there is crime and instability, people are going to leave. What should we do about it? The last go around didn’t work out so well.

  • Theodore Martin

    Here is a thought on the topic. How about sending this to United States President Trump, He needs to be informed along with Congress as of the status of folks living in Honduras, He might offer some aid to help with the problems also if these folks can gather so many to leave why not stand up for change for the whole country instead of fleeing? In America people protest for change

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      How can a person go about sending a letter or article to the White House? You are spot on when you wrote: “…if these folks can gather so many to leave why not stand up for change for the whole country instead of fleeing?” We are hoping for just that; real change in Honduras for the millions, not the illegal escape of a few thousand. Thank you for sharing your perspective.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Thank you again for the suggestion — I Googled how to send a message to the White House, and I just sent it! It reads as follows:

      Dear President Trump and Congress:

      I am a U.S. citizen married to a native Honduran, and since we married five years ago we have parented 11 orphaned and abandoned youth in this third world country in addition to starting a small school for at-risk youth. We live in an 800 square foot cinderblock home without modern amenities on the outskirts of our rural town.

      I would like to address the complex issue of the illegal migrant caravans, in which we must exam one of the root causes: lawlessness on Honduran soil. We personally have suffered repeated robberies and even violent crimes with virtually zero police response:



      My husband was kidnapped and brutally beaten by a local gang two years ago; his brother was shot dead point-blank (with eye witnesses); and our cattle were stolen, all crimes of which were received with total apathy from local authorities.

      I understand the migrant caravans to be a desperate cry for help (although not done in a dignified fashion), and I do affirm that the problem lies in the lack of public order in Honduras (which must be enacted top-down). This leads to the careless formation of citizens who have very little respect for laws and for one another. (Many children and teens choose not to go to school; there is rampant sexual abuse with no punishment, etc.) Those who break the law, in turn, wreak havoc on the country’s law-abiding citizens who are powerless to stop them.

      The caravan is simply the visible result of the chaos that occurs on Honduran soil daily, and letting the immigrants pass the United States border will do nothing to help the 9 million Hondurans who’ve stayed behind. I believe the solution must be forged on Honduran soil, with the immediate intervention of an overseeing, transparent international community as Honduras has not yet been able to foster justice and create a prosperous nation alone. Without law and order in Honduras, additional migrant caravans will doubtlessly continue to be organized in the future.

    • smclindsey

      Aid, in the form of money, will only go to the corrupt government officials. Money does not solve problems, if anything it makes them worse.

      • Marie Tallman

        I think the Trump administration is well aware of the corruption of the government in Honduras. There is no easy fix. The US can’t come down there and declare Marshal law…the change has to come from the Honduran people. If the migrants can band together to come to the US they can band together to demand change, They just don’t know how powerful they are when they stick together.

    • Marilynn

      The United States sends millions of dollars to all the Central American countries. I guess I should say the American citizen taxpayer dollars.

  • TW

    How about the Honduran people force a revolution and institute whatever style of government they choose to live under. Ask our forefathers the sacrifices necessary to revolt from the yolk of a British Monarchy and then form a Constitutional Republic which we live and prosper under today.

    Honduras is whatever government the people accept living under. Just like the author of this story chooses to live in the conditions he is. This author sounds like he has a martyr complex and is teaching us how bad and selfish we are for not being martyrs too. How offensive Ms. Canales.

    • smclindsey

      I don’t get that attitude at all. This sounds like an American missionary who is trying to help people get an education, and win them to Christ. One hundred years ago, nobody had these luxuries we have today. They lived simple, clean lives, and many if not most, were Christians. What our parents, grandparents, great grandparents lived with, or without, did not kill them. Hard work and living the best you can with what you have, promotes progress and peace of mind.

      • TW

        I am an American Jew smclindsey so you know what they say when you assume something and make a false conclusion.. You make a great case for what living under a ‘free’ and ‘unfree’ governmental system is all about.

        In a ‘free’ government you earn the fruits of your labors and are rewarded for ones entrepreneurship or taking less risk and being a productive worker for your company. The difference is You the ‘individual’ has a choice.

        Under ‘unfree’ governments the people’s ability to control their destinies is usurped by an oppressive and often corrupt government. Some people can thrive in that type environment and they tend to prey on the weak and less accomplished either by physical force or controlling, food, power, and shelter.

        So Honduras must be judged by what it is not what you would like it to be. The Honduran government is corrupt, police are corrupt, and drug cartels live in symbiosis with the government sucking the life out of the resources their piece of real estate offers. So it goes…..

      • Jennifer Zilly Canales

        Dear smclindsey: Thank you so much for contributing this very healthy point of view. Yes; almost all of the modern luxuries we cling to today did not even exist 100 years ago, and even so people could live simple, clean lives in the light of God’s will. Thank you for understanding part of the point I was hoping to put forth, and please pray with us that God’s Word might be proclaimed (in word and deed) with love in both the USA and Honduras.

    • Salvador Torres

      The people have no weapons, they’re poor and weak. The Honduras’ army is trained and supported by the US. Not an easy task.

      • TW

        Nothing worth fighting for is easy Salvador, is it?

      • Betty Echols

        Several news outlets have reported that the immigrants have fired on the Mexican police and set fire to their immigration camp….

  • 1Finngal

    It’s important to remember that the majority of Hondurans and other immigrants did NOT all of a decide to start marching to the USA. They have been lied to and manipulated by powerful and monied groups that have a political agenda. This is probably the saddest part of all.

    • Salvador Torres

      Show the proof! You’re repeating what Foxnews have said without evidence.

      • moztake

        Ami Horowitz, an independent journalist, went to Oaxaca to investigate the caravan. I think you’ll find that there is evidence for it being an organized event. Search for his video on youtube: ‘Ami Horowitz caravan’

        • You do realize Horowitz worked/works for Fox News and has influenced Trumps views/rhetoric on immigration, right? He has a very obvious agenda.

          • moztake

            I know that Tucker Carlson used Horwitz’s video on his show (but I don’t think Horowitz works for Fox), and I seriously doubt that he has ever had any real influence on Trump. What I do know is that he interviewed several caravan members about their experiences and, because I speak Spanish, I know that the the translations of the people’s responses were correct. I know that Horowitz has a particular worldview because everyone has a worldview. My life’s experience has led me to believe that the left/democrats generally do not tell both sides of a story, and I was a democrat for over 25 years. I trust Horowitz because I believe he’s telling the side of the story that the democrat controlled media does not tell.

      • 1Finngal

        I replied earlier today with links to sources for my information. When I last checked, they were still pending, meaning this website has not released them for posting. I’m not sure, but it might be because they included links to other websites. Judicial Watch has done extensive investigating and reporting on this matter. That’s where I get my info. Also Signs of the Times (SOTT).net has a good investigative report on this matter. Oh, I don’t watch FOX news or any of the lamestream media networks.

      • Marilynn

        There are actual videos. I have watched migrants lned up and someon handing them money. It’s all over the nternet. I know your easiest answer is Fox News, but that’s not the case.

    • Marie Tallman

      Have you watched the videos of the Caravan. Someone is organizing it…you can see people giving instructions. They are fed, they have money to purchase food along the way or pay for train rides…as they did last night. If they are so poor…who is paying those bills?

      • alex Amador

        george Soros went public teamed with mastercard and is one behind this look up the info just like he did with all the muslims invading europe hello they are not wanted in tijuana the people last night were ready to spill some blood as they saw how they acted at the guatemala mex border ..good chaotic videos already up and streamin of the honduran plage not even a dozen will be let in to the states…

    • Marilynn

      They have been paid.

  • Denis Kucharski

    The U.S. has a long and sad history of supporting right wing dictatorships in S. America. The U.S. supported the Pinochet dictatorship, right wingers in Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and many others. Now it is blocking the import of insulin for diabetics to Venezuela, causing many terrible deaths. It does the same thing to Cuba. Whenever a country tries to work together to build a democratic country and use its natural resources for the benefit of its people the U.S. immediately sends in the CIA. Same thing with the middle east. As it stands now, the U.S. is the single largest exporter of weapons to war torn countries throughout the world. Sending weapons to countries at war prolongs the conflicts.

    • moztake

      Unfortunately, in order to stop left-wing dictatorships, which historically have killed millions, the U.S. has had to support governments that were certainly not ideal, but the lesser of two evils.

      • Denis Kucharski

        Hillary Clinton was a terrible terrible Secretary of State. Her penchant for supporting coups in Libya and Honduras resulted in destabilizing the region. Under Quaddafi Libya was one of the most successful African nations. Now it is ruled by tribal warlords, there is literally a market for human slaves, and the country is so violent Americans are urged not to go there.

        • moztake

          I agree.

        • Kathleen Crow-Chuculate

          This has long been a problem with the US. It’s either go in and try to help and make it bad or let them deal with it and make it bad.

          The US needs to just stay out of it and let the people handle their own crap and the people need to stop asking the US for the help

      • Drew

        Evil is evil! Please tell me how an authoritarian right wing government is less evil than a left wing authoritarian government is? Pinochet was a butcher, Somoza was a butcher. The US should be standing for justice and freedom not supporting one evil dictatorial regime over another dictatorial regime! There is no moral equivalancy!

        • moztake

          Stalin, Lenin, Hitler (yes, fascism is an ideology of the left because the men who created it-Mussolini and Giovani Gentile were socialists), Pol Pot, and other leftists are responsible for the bloodiest century in human history.
          The US government cannot choose what governments they have to deal with.

    • The far left is the ones that want to take your liberties away

    • TJ Miller

      …so can we just nuke everyone and call it good?

  • There is someone encouraging the people to leave.
    I thank God for someone who will give of their life to help the poor and downtrodden.
    I read where someone says the far right makes these lives unbearable.
    The far left is the ones who wants Socialism and wants government to tell you what to do with your family
    I do not mind people coming to the USA as long as they do it legally.
    But if you attempt to cross our border illegally you should be sent back without the uses of our justice system.

  • Joyce Colón

    I too was married legally to a white Honduran. He abandoned me when his father died, moved back to Honduras to claim his inheritance, sold the properties he inherited and left me hanging. We had a landscaping business. He sold it to his brother and gave all of my property to his brother here in the USA This all happened while I was away on business. His brother bought a house using our business as collateral. When I returned was when I discovered all this. His brother was nowhere to be found. I ended up homeless and severely traumatized. I know all about life in Honduras. There is good and bad in every nationality.

    The U.S. dollar goes very far there. One can live like royalty on very little U. S. dollars if they choose to. I know that there is a lot of crime and corruption there. I also know many who come to the U. S come just to save money, send money back and eventually return to live more comfortably.

    There are most likely some seeking asylum and some just coming to take advantage of the opportunities here, and save only to return. I also know for a fact that corrupt politicians there have paid off Hondurans to join the caravan.

    Each case has to be evaluated individually. The problem is verifying their stories. I know that there will be many liars. Some are humble, respectful, and have good hearts. Others are not. Case by case basis. But they shouldn’t be ignored. Like I said, every nationality has good and bad.

    I will say this, I was left with a bad taste in my mouth from my personal experience but I refuse to hate or stereotype because of it. I handle every person based on their actions, not words.

    • BayArea60s

      Joyce….No nation should have to spend their resources on people who just show up. It’s like someone just showing up at your door, and demanding you have to let them in your house. Once inside now you’re responsible for them, you must supply any needs they have. Then you have to spend your $$$ to find out who has just pushed their way into your house. and then if you find you will reject them, you have to get them out of your house. No one on this planet lives this way

  • Marilynn

    You said you married 5 years ago. Was that when you moved to Honduras? I suggest you try to get online and listen to the interviews with the migrants. They all have pretty much the same line, which is, I want a better life. But some added they want a better life because of the benefits. You would be surprised at the interviews. Then I watched a video of a woman from Tijuana, an activist. She was begging for help to get the mgrants out off Tijuana. They are trashing things destroying things scaring the citizens. The Mexicans brought them chicken dinners and they threw it in the trash. They said WE WANT PIZZA AND SODA. So you can think how wonderful these people are, but when they left Honduras, they turned into animals. Oh and by the way, their are American citizens living on the streets that would like a “better life”.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Marilynn: Thank you so much for taking the time to read the article and then post your comment. To answer your questions — I moved to Honduras six-and-a-half years ago as a single woman and met and married my husband in my first year here.

      I could not agree with you more in regards to your statements about many of the migrants, and I believe what you are saying. In no way was I trying to defend their behaviour or their desire for a “better life” — I strived to make that clear in the article but perhaps did not do so as well as I had hoped. I do not support illegal immigration, and the many photos I have seen of them knocking down police barricades, climbing over fences/on roofs, etc, show completely wrong and even aggressive attitudes. In the past year here in Honduras there have been many public protests of people burning tires and blockading highways, all of which causes great amounts of public disorder (and of which I do not support). My family and I have headed to the public highways during those times in order to share God’s Word with the people, pray and try to bring about a measure of peace and respect.

      I love my husband (who is Honduran), our Honduran children and the team of Hondurans I serve alongside of, but that does not mean that I support nor encourage the destructive tendencies of some Hondurans. I hope there is no confusion there. God bless you, and I hope by responding to your comment I was able to clear up some of your concerns.

      • Marilynn

        You seem to have made a very special life and wonderful loving family. I’m so happy for you. I also feel sad that some in your country don’t try to make their life better in their own country. Prayers.

        • Jennifer Zilly Canales

          Thank you, Marilynn.

  • harbidoll

    Some blame is cuz we no longer “go unto all the world” so He is bringing them to US.

  • Minarchism Leads To Freedom

    Honduras is in desperate need of reform and an effective judicial system as it is overwhelmingly true that injustice and violence reign. But that does not mean that the solution is for Hondurans to flee the country illegally.

    Derp. That’s nuts, the best thing they could do is run to a better life because there is nothing they could do to make Honduras better. This whole article is cray cray and reads like somebody who’s suffering from a 3rd world version of Stockholm syndrome.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Minarchism Leads To Freedom: Thank you for sharing your honest opinion. One of the questions I wanted to propose is this: Is there room in the United States for all 9 million Hondurans to arrive as migrants (if, as your wrote, there is nothing anyone could do to make Honduras better), or would it be more practical and beneficial to all to seek out and implement long-term solutions on Honduran soil? (Another question: Can the United States receive all the world’s poor who are seeking a better life?) Peace be with you, and please be praying with us for God’s will to be done both in the United States and in Honduras during this time.

      • Minarchism Leads To Freedom

        Dear Minarchism Leads To Freedom: Thank you for sharing your honest opinion. One of the questions I wanted to propose is this: Is there room in the United States for all 9 million Hondurans to arrive as migrants (if, as your wrote, there is nothing anyone could do to make Honduras better)

        Yes, America is a country of immigrants and it could easily take in that many.

        or would it be more practical and beneficial to all to seek out and implement long-term solutions on Honduran soil?

        People should be free to do whatever they want. If they want to go then they should be allowed to go.

        If you’re Christian, let me ask you a question: should Jesus have been forced to stay in Bethlehem to make it a better place or did he have a fundamental natural right to travel to make the world a better place?

        (Another question: Can the United States receive all the world’s poor who are seeking a better life?)

        Yes, it grows our economy and make us better as a country.

        Peace be with you, and please be praying with us for God’s will to be done both in the United States and in Honduras during this time.

        For sure, I’ll pray for the Hondurans to fully embrace natural rights because that’s God’s will.

        • Jerry Wayne

          Sure, people should be free to where they want to. But not free to break laws of the country they are heading to.

          • Minarchism Leads To Freedom

            Sure, people should be free to go where they want to.

            It is a natural right that our government (America) is supposed to protect. As long as they’re peaceful people they should be allowed in. See natural right to travel. Also see freedom of association.

            But not free to break laws of the country they are heading to.

            Sure, as long as those laws don’t infringe on a person’s natural rights.

            if they come from a place where stealing is to be expected, how will they adapt here?

            Should we tell Detroiters they can’t move since Detroit has a crime problem too? What about New Jerseyites since their state is famous for mob activity? Your question is an association fallacy.

          • Dee

            Except that NJ & MI aren’t 3rd world countries. Hondurans have no concept of life in the US, whereas NJ & MI residents do. That’s just 1 major difference.

          • Minarchism Leads To Freedom

            Except that NJ & MI aren’t 3rd world countries

            Being 3rd world means that Honduras has less producers of goods and services for Hondurans to rob. You could probably argue that NJ and MI actually have more thieves because of this. (Especially if you correctly identify taxation and debt as being a form of robbery.)

            Hondurans have no concept of life in the US, whereas NJ & MI residents do.

            We already have over half a million Honduran immigrants in the US and most of them are doing quite well for themselves. They’re having no problem adapting to our way of life.

            That’s just 1 major difference.

            That doesn’t amount to anything but a guilt by association argument and an evil forever argument. I mean really, just because your neighbor steals stuff to survive doesn’t mean you’re a thief because you live next to him and just because he’s stealing now doesn’t mean he can’t one day repent and become a good person in the future. (Odds are, he probably would if he faced deportation like the Honduran immigrants do.)

        • Pahoran

          If there were more people like Jennifer Zilly Canales struggling to improve the condition of the Honduran people, there would be fewer Hondurans risking their lives for a chance to live in the United States. I greatly admire her commitment to helping the youth of Honduras improve their lives, at great personal sacrifice. A couple of months ago, our neighbors (and good friends) sent their only son to serve as a Christian missionary in Honduras for 2 years. His service may not have a profound impact on the country, but it will likely have a profound impact on dozens or even hundreds of Hondurans whose lives will improve significantly as they incorporate the principles of Christian living into their daily lives. Those who believe that the United States should open their borders to all who want to live here should first demonstrate their sincerity by taking in a refugee or asylum seeker into their own home.

          • Jennifer Zilly Canales

            Dear Pahoran: Thank you for your constructive comments and for your positive understanding of what we hope to accomplish in Honduras. The good news is that are many ministries (large and small) around this nation that are working to pick up the pieces of broken lives, raise orphaned/abandoned children in the light of God’s Word, and spread peace in a country that all to often reverts to violence. Please pray with and for all of us here, that God might grant us the protection to continue laboring with His word and His love for many years to come, and that in His timing there might be a great harvest for His glory. God bless you.

            (I am also in total agreement with your last point — those that so vehemently say that all immigrants should be allowed to pass the United States border should sign up to receive at least one immigrant family in their home, help them acclimate to American culture, find a job, etc. It is much too easy to comment on a topic and say that the borders should be totally open when one is personally uninvolved in the situation and has virtually nothing on the table. Thank you for presenting this viewpoint.)

          • Minarchism Leads To Freedom

            If there were more people like Jennifer Zilly Canales struggling to improve the condition of the Honduran people, there would be fewer Hondurans risking their lives for a chance to live in the United States.

            I disagree, I think having Hondurans working abroad will do far more for Honduras because a lot of them will send back money for people to invest in the economy and a lot of them will pick up valuable skills they can use to make money when and if they decide to return. Teaching people geography and telling them everything is good isn’t going to have the same effect as that.

            The free exchange labor isn’t a zero sum gain. It benefits both countries.

            Those who believe that the United States should open their borders to all who want to live here should first demonstrate their sincerity by taking in a refugee or asylum seeker into their own home.

            For sure, I think a better thing to do would be to help them get a job and and a place to rent so they’re not continuing to be dependent on other people for their survival.

    • Christine Rufkahr

      Did we read the same article???

      • Minarchism Leads To Freedom

        Did we read the same article???

        Indeed, I guess we just took two completely different takes on it.

  • Joyce Colón

    This was years ago. And I’m not trying to “do what the Roman’s are doing”.

  • Jesus is my friend

    -President Trump said that he wasn’t going to allow the caravan into the United States, and he has taken steps to prove that he won’t. Since that’s the case, I don’t think that other people should have encouraged the caravan to proceed.

    -I don’t understand why the central argument about this issue has revolved around political parties in the United States instead of being collaborative about alternate solutions that could resettle those in most need in other areas of Latin America. How could turning people’s lives into a political argument be helping them? The United States isn’t the only place in the world where people can be happy and productive. To suggest otherwise is nonsensical in every respect. Even the Old Testament provides no basis for saying that everyone in the world who has a problem has to end up living in the United States. Most religions say something that is equivalent to “There was nothing. Then, G-d created the world.” I don’t think there is even one religion that says “There was nothing. Then, G-d created the United States.”

    -If I had to migrate somewhere, I’d want to migrate to a country where English was the first language. Although I like other languages, I’m only fluent in English, and I know that even for people who are fluent in a second language, there is always some feeling of isolation when you’re living somewhere that is linguistically and culturally different from your place of origin. I really think that it’s not only possible, but probable, that most of the people in the caravans have an unrealistic idea of what their lives in the United States would be like, and I don’t think that people who are using old and simplistic tropes about the United States being an immigrant country are helping them. The history of the predominant culture in the United States is that we killed off and displaced the Native Americans, forced the “immigration” of Africans whom we enslaved, and were content to allow millions of immigrants who fled poverty and conflict in other countries to live and work in squalid conditions, in tenements, factories and as servants. It’s never been THAT much fun to be an immigrant in the United States. Frequently, it’s not that much fun to be a fully fledged citizen of the United States. If I spoke fluent Spanish and weren’t destitute, I’d like to travel in the safer areas of Latin America. Latin America is not inferior to the United States, although it has its problems.

    -Adding to my idea that the majority of people in the caravan are not the most educated people, who have not thought about what their other options might be, are reports that LGBTQ migrants in the caravan have been mistreated by other travelers. It’s an interesting plot development; I think that the U.S. government should grant asylum to the LGBTQ migrants. It’s entirely believable that the options for safety in Latin America which are available to other migrants aren’t available to the LGBTQ migrants.

  • O’Pinyon

    We who are believers can start by praying for the people of Honduras.
    They need a vision of a new Honduras,
    and then they need the will to make it happen.
    There is always a cost, as our history shows.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear O’Pinyon: Thank you for taking the time to read the article and then sharing your constructive thoughts. Thank you for your commitment to pray for the people of Honduras, that God might give this nation a new vision and the according will to make it happen. God bless you.

      • O’Pinyon

        And you, my sister.

  • Jesus is my friend

    President Trump said that he wasn’t going to allow the caravan into US, and he has taken steps to prove that he won’t. Since that’s the case, I don’t think that other people should have encouraged the caravan to proceed.

    I also don’t understand why the central argument about this issue has revolved around political parties in the US. That is instead of being collaborative about alternate solutions that could resettle those in most need in other areas of Latin America. How could turning people’s lives into a political argument be helping them? The US isn’t the only place where people can be happy and productive. To suggest otherwise is nonsensical in every respect. Even the Old Testament provides no basis for saying that everyone in the world who has a problem has to end up living in the United States. Most religions say something that is equivalent to “There was nothing. Then, God created the world.” I don’t think there is even one religion that says “There was nothing. Then, God created the US.”

    – I’d want to migrate to a country where English was the first language. I like other languages, but I’m only fluent in English, and I know that even for people who are fluent in a second language, there is always some feeling of isolation when you’re living somewhere that is linguistically and culturally different from your place of origin. I really think that it’s not only possible, but probable, that most of the people in the caravans have an unrealistic idea of what their lives in the US would be like, and I don’t think that people who are using old and simplistic tropes about the US being an immigrant country are helping them. The history of the predominant culture in the US is that we displaced the Native Americans, forced the “immigration” of slaves from Africa, and were content to allow millions of immigrants who fled poverty and conflict in other countries to live and work in squalid conditions, in tenements, factories and as servants. It’s never been THAT much fun to be an immigrant in the US. Frequently, it’s not that much fun to be a fully fledged citizen of the United States. If I spoke fluent Spanish and weren’t destitute, I’d like to travel in the safer areas of Latin America. Latin America is not inferior to the United States, although it has its problems.

  • Dennis

    Thank you for your humble and thoughtful assessment. I appreciate your sincere efforts to make your ministry as local as possible. I taught a young adult Bible School class last winter discussing the whole concept of short term missionary trips and how they often, though well-intentioned, are more harmful than helpful.
    While people who are not Christians can and do bless their fellow man, we recognize that ultimately man’s greatest need is spiritual. Human misery has its roots in human sinfulness. This does not mean that all suffering is the result of personal sin.
    We each in our corner can bring a little light and hope as we reach out in love, a love which often must be a suffering love.
    Blessings to you as you pour out your heart in service in the corner God has called you to serve.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Dennis: Thank you. Yes; man’s greatest need is spiritual and all answers are found in Christ. This is what we believe. Thank you for your very encouraging and insightful comments — I could not agree with you more about the fact that many short-term trips do more harm than help (despite their best intentions); your diagnosis that much of humanity’s suffering is the result of sin; and the fact that God has called each of us to shine His light in the little corner of the world where He’s placed us (and that oftentimes the love He calls us to share is a suffering love). Thank you for using your words to bless and instruct, and please pray that God’s will might be done and that hearts might turn towards Him in repentance during this time. Thank you again.

  • Doug Andrews

    Thanks for the article and the incredibly helpful perspective.
    A few questions of you if you have the time…
    1. Who is stirring up these people to create/join these caravans and leave Honduras, and why?
    2. Is it LEGAL for them to cross into Mexico?
    3. How can churches in the US help your ministry?
    Thanks so much
    Doug

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Doug Andrews: Thank you for taking the time to read the article and then posting your comments/questions. I am glad our perspective (however limited) proved to be helpful to you. To answer your questions:

      1. I am honestly not entirely sure who is stirring up the people and inciting them to create/join the caravans. I have heard many rumors, but I have no firsthand knowledge. Many Hondurans are very upset with the current president due to many accounts of fraud held against him, but beyond that I can say nothing with certainty. I have also heard that a European organization has been helping the migrants financially/logistically, but you would have to investigate this further in order to know more.

      2. As for it being legal to cross into Mexico, I am also unsure about that. From the online research I did several weeks ago, it seemed that they had to line up on the bridge over the Suchiate River (the dividing line between Guatemala and Mexico) in order to be received by the Mexican police and follow whatever protocols they set forth. Many people did not go this route as they instead jumped off the bridge and floated across the river on rafts in order to avoid the police, which makes what they did illegal. I have no further details on the matter.

      3. As for how churches (or individuals/families) can help our ministry, you can Google “Hidden Treasures in Honduras”, which is the name of the blog I maintain, and from there you can click on the link and on the blog you can find information on how to pray for us or how to donate financially in order to allow our school/mission to continue serving local Honduras. You can algo Google “Commission to Every Nation”, which is the name of the missionary cooperative we partner with, along with my name (Jennifer Zilly Canales), and a different weblink will appear with direct donation information.

      Thank you again for your insightful questions, and God bless you. Please pray with us for God to move amidst this entire ordeal (both in the United States and in Honduras), turning hearts towards Him in repentance and faith, for that is what will really make positive changes in any nation.

  • whittierblvd

    and the usa is supposed to pay for the lack of intestinal fortitude of the govt there and its people??

  • Gary Deatherage

    They need to stay and effect change in their own country. Rather than illegally invading the U.S. get a coalition backing to help assist in effecting the changes needed in these 3rd world countries.

  • Christine Rufkahr

    This is one of the best articles I’ve ever read. Thank you for sharing this information and for all you do for our World. You are an exceptional person!

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Christine Rufkahr: Thank you so much for taking the time to read the article and post your uplifting comments. Thank you also for understanding that my goal in writing was simply to share honest information (that of our daily experiences). Whatever extremely small amount of good our family/mission does is due to God’s grace in and through us. God bless you.

  • Kevin Tompkins

    Sorry to hear about your husband. How did he escape?

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Kevin Tompkins: After being tied up and beaten several hours by seven men, they threatened to take his life (which is the normal end result of this type of contact with a local gang), and my husband told them that he was at peace and ready to meet the Lord face to face should they kill him. Moments later they decided to let him go without explanation, and he stumbled off through a huge pineapple field until he reached a highway police stop over a mile away and was able to get help. We consider this to be a miracle of God’s protection, as there is no logical reason they should have let him go. God bless you, and please be praying with us for God’s will to be done both in the United States and Honduras.

  • Padre3210

    It begins with Politics. Honduras need proper law enforcement before anything else good can happen. I don’t know how you do it.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear Padre3210: Thank you for reading the article and sharing your opinion. I agree with you; Honduras needs proper law enforcement. Please be praying with us that the proper steps might be taken so that this might come about for a safer, more peaceful and prosperous Honduras. God bless you.

    • D Ice

      Padre, while I agree you need law enforcement, first you need to grow their Economy!

      The same Democrats and RINOS who loved sending our jobs to India and China could care less about Central America or the Americas in general. Why didn’t companies look to open up factories in Central America with tons of low wage workers and slowly help improve the job prospects there? Reason: because those countries couldn’t offer up any benefits over India and China but yet they are way closer in terms of shipping times and much cheaper.

      You should ask the idiot who runs Apple (who is a Democrat) this question: Why have you moved all your production to CHINA? Why didn’t you open factories in Central and South America? Why are you moving your headquarters to China too?

      Why, if the Democrats claim to care about Central Americans, wouldn’t they work to help improve the Economies of Central America thus making it less likely citizens of those countries would feel they needed to leave and go to the USA? WHY DEMOCRATS WHY??

      Oh yeah, bring these people in across the border and guess what—thousands of new voters whether illegal or not!

  • max

    So professionals make a dollar an hour and you just can’t understand why these kids don’t want to put in the work to get to such a vaunted position in life. That is exactly the same things teens do in America and everywhere else in the world.

    Your brother in law was murdered, your husband was kidnapped and beaten and the authorities laughed you out of the station. You have to pay protection money to the criminals and war taxes to the corrupt government and thats cool with you? And this from probably a white american citizen, you recieve special treatment even if you don’t realize it.

    This is a fantastic argument for allowing asylum. How many sons are killed and daughters sold into prostitution? You are trying to convince them to stay and us to not let them in? What is wrong with you?

    • TJ Miller

      A lot of what she described is nearly the exact same situation in 90% of Central and South America. Shall we offer asylum to everyone, nearly everywhere, in Central/South America?

      Let me reiterate this: aside from a small handful of nations (e.g. Chile, Argentina, etc), pretty much everywhere south of Mexico has the exact same problems.

      I think at that point maybe it would be a lesser strain on our social systems and economy if we just, oh I dunno, invade nearly everything South of the Mexico border (and perhaps parts of Mexico as well, considering Cartels…) and just run it.

      • max

        Your argument is fallacious, specifically reductio ad absurdum. We do not have 9 million people nor all of the people south of Mexico requesting asylum. Just 7,000 or so.

        War is not the answer but perhaps taking in honduran nationals and giving them the education and the opportunity to go help their country is.

        • TJ Miller

          No fallacy – just assuming you could follow to a very logical conclusion, and I skipped the middlemen, as it were. I’ll help fill in the blanks:

          You said, specifically, the following: “This is a fantastic argument for allowing asylum. How many sons are
          killed and daughters sold into prostitution? You are trying to convince
          them to stay and us to not let them in? What is wrong with you?”

          This implies that we should let *everyone* in who asks for asylum coming in from countries that experience such conditions. I pointed out that these conditions are *common* throughout nearly all of Central/South America.

          It doesn’t matter that “Just 7,000 or so” have specifically demanded asylum at the border at this time ( I might add – in spite of bypassing numerous US Consulates, avoiding the checkpoints — where they can specifically request it — and even spurning offers from Mexico to gain asylum in Mexico, but anyway…) Now, once we grant to one under your conditions, we grant to all, like it or not. Once word gets out that “Just 7,000 or so” got in that way, the floodgates will spring wide open, and the next wave will have 70,000 – at least.

          There is absolutely no absurdity at all in what I wrote, because it would become an eventuality, given the facts at hand.

          So… how would you handle 70k people demanding what you freely gave 7k? What if the next wave after that was 100k, and successive waves came in at the same numbers? Think it impossible? You don’t know human nature.

          • max

            That is a huge assumption, another fallacy. We already let in about 85,000 asylee’s a year. These are likely the bravest and most 8ntelligent of the lot. I would have no problem allowing them to come and set down roots here. Immigrants are and have always been the highest performing citizens and so any investment getting them started would be realized in taxes down the road.

            So that is my answer to you. Give them a chance and you will be rewarded greatly. I think it is you who doesn’t know human nature.

          • D Ice

            Another Lie! They tend to be the Weakest, Least Educated of all. Of course you Democrat scumbags want them to come so you can offer free shit–like always– and get them to Vote for your Sad, Lying candidates!!

            Max–you are a #Leftist lowlife.

            Why not let in the Thousands of Colombians who have College Degrees, are Well Educated, and would help our Country?? Oh yeah, because most turn into REPUBLICANS after they see the Lies of Democrats!!

        • D Ice

          They will only ensure MORE are brought to our border. They, by INTERNATIONAL LAW, CANNOT CLAIM Asylum in the US. They have to claim it in Mexico. PERIOD! Sorry!

          Also, THEY NEVER GO BACK Pal! EVER! Some will only go back to Retire and buy cheap land and take advantage of those less fortunate in their home country.

        • Singletrackgirl77

          Did you not read the article? Education and opportunity ARE being provided to the Hondurans, but many, particularly the young males, are rejecting the offers to better themselves as they do not wish to put in the time, effort or commitment.

    • Jennifer Zilly Canales

      Dear max: Thank you for voicing your honest concerns. Just to make it clear, I did not say that we pay protection money to the criminals or war taxes to the corrupt government officials (what I did say is that many Hondurans, although by no means all, have to do so). I also never wrote that the corruption and violence is cool with me; I simply tried to portray certain aspects of our daily life in Honduras (both the good and the bad) for people who most likely have little to no firsthand knowledge of this country. The corruption, violence, ignorance, etc is deeply saddening and frustrating to me.

      You mentioned that me being white garners me special treatment. You may be right in certain regards (and I have no way of changing this), but in many cases me/my family are targets for that same reason. Years ago we tried raising chickens in a little outdoor hutch on our rural property in order to produce eggs for our own consumption, and we suffered so many robberies that we eventually couldn’t maintain our chicken coop. People would come all the way up our long dirt path in order to steal our chickens while there are literally hundreds of free-roaming (and easily caught) chickens in the more populated and accessible part of our neighborhood. This is just one example, but we have been targeted many times and have not been spared or favored, although I respectfully understand if you do not agree.

      To comment of your last paragraph…Many of the people in the caravan are not necessarily in need of asylum but are simply looking for more material comfort and prosperity. We personally know many such cases of people in no immediate peril, with a healthy support network in Honduras, opportunities to work and/or study, etc, who simply fled without any real reason. I know many people do not agree with me or do not believe me, but it is true. A local 15-year-old boy left his pregnant teenage girlfriend in the middle of the night without saying goodbye to his mom and joined the caravan, which is just one example of irresponsible escape but there are many more similar stories. Many of our teen male students (whom I deeply care for and am not seeking to speak poorly of) tell us that they’ll “just go move to the United States” when they’re thinking about dropping out of school or don’t want to put up with the discipline required to live an honest life. This attitude is very common and many people in our area see the United States as some unrealistic quick-fix to all of their problems. Some people are escaping gang-related violence or have gone through horrific situations, but by no means all. Honduras is in desperate need of reform (which I wrote at the end of the article and tried to explain through our personal encounters with lawlessness), but I do not believe the solution is that some or all should flee the country. We need long-term solutions here, and we also need to understand that not everyone in the caravan is escaping for their life.

      I hope my comments are able to shed a bit more light on your concerns, and I ask that you would be praying that God might grant me greater love for His people and wisdom to do this work well (and peace while serving in a nation where violent acts oftentimes occur). God bless you.

      • The Bag Lady

        I am curious, though, as to what you think should be done with the people in the caravan who have already left and have walked all that distance. Should they be denied a hearing for their claim for asylum? Should they be jailed? Should they be turned away and told to return to Honduras? Do you agree with the policy of the current administration of ripping children from their parents and housing them in cages? While I understand the point you are making about many of them not necessarily being in need of asylum, why should they not look for more material comfort and prosperity? Is there something inherently evil in trying to better one’s living conditions? The United States have been held up as the shining example of the land of golden opportunity for many years. Just because you are happy living your life without the creature comforts so many Americans take for granted, does that mean that everyone should live as you do?

        What can be done in Honduras to fix the corruption that is causing these people to seek a better life elsewhere? (A lot of these are rhetorical questions – I have no answers, myself, and definitely do not know what the solution is.)

        Thank you for presenting your point of view from the other side of the equation.

        • D Ice

          It was the Obama Admin that put kids in cages! Sorry! Stick to the Facts please!!

          • Delores Bruyette

            Thank you for informing them of this fact.

    • MsTxGal

      Max, I hear your passion. I am looking forward to hearing back from you about the immigrants you take into your home, support and share your table with. The Americas (North, South and Centra) are counting on you to step up and put action behind all that passion. I encourage you move out from behind that keyboard and put in even a fraction of the honest, hard work that Jennifer and her husband do so willingly and lovingly for the people of Honduras IN Honduras. I know you’re willing to make the sacrifices necessary to make a difference at least as much as, if not more than Jennifer and her family and I look forward to hearing back from you on the milestones you achieve along the way. Good luck!

    • Jeri Schroeder

      I believe she would like to see reform in Honduras. At least that is what I understood.

    • Cathy Kiley

      These people were offered asylum in Mexico, and jobs, and refused it Max, and that’s the truth. They want the U.S. and only the U.S. because they think we are rich. Stay current and keep up. Don’t just watch CNN.

  • TheBerean

    Securing Trump re-election in 2020 is only one outcome of this event.

  • Stretchsportguy

    Well done. Much love to you…

  • Jae Johnson

    She said “illegal” and they’ve not broken any laws yet. That spoke her slant. There are very heavy “war taxes” that gangs place on local businesses, making it very difficult for many to earn an honest living. If you don’t pay the demanded rate each month, your life may be taken”
    Shameful and justified.

    • Jane Lowell Israel

      Yes, she talks about that in her article.

  • D Ice

    Jennifer: Gracias por todo que hacen ustedes! Lo Siento que tengo que explicar aqui a los que lean que la economia de Honduras y otros paises cerca fueron dejados a morir por los Democrats y otros aqui en los EEUU.

    Puede ser que Dios Les Bendiga mucho y trae a ustedes todo las cosas que necesitan para apoyar la gente y especialmente a apoyar y cuidar para los jovenes de Honduras.

    Que le vaya bien!

  • Mona Keegan

    Excellent article about Honduras and the related immigration caravan. I have traveled to much of Central America over my lifetime. I have refused to return since my last visit in 2009 to Nicaragua. I have not suffered any physical harm, but on that visit our van, carrying about 10 women who were all U.S.Citizens plus the driver and a helper who were local, was stopped twice by armed bandits demanding payment for safe passage through the jungle from Managua to the Pacific Coast. That was the end of any more travel to any of these lawless countries. My observation is that there is an institutional/ cultural acceptance and maintenance of a feudal society. In Nicaragua in 2009, the locals still lived very primitively. Children are only given public education through the 4th grade and it is only half day for that. I believe the governmental institutions support a large, ignorant servant class. The upper class have comfortable lives, but their moral compass is vastly different than most U.S. citizens. The upper class do not appear to see the lower class as human in my opinion. I really admire what you are doing. You are brave in the face of great opposition. God Bless You in all you do.

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