Underreported: Christian Baker Reacts to Government Official Comparing Him to a Nazi

Jack Phillips’ father fought in World War II, and saw many of the Holocaust atrocities for himself.

This video grab shows Jack Phillips, a Christian baker sued for declining to bake a cake for a same-sex wedding, near the grave of his father, who fought in World War II and witnessed Holocaust atrocities first-hand.

By Kelsey Harkness Published on September 6, 2017

In 2014, Colorado Civil Rights Commissioner Diann Rice compared Jack Phillips, a Christian baker who was sued for declining to make a cake for a same-sex ceremony, to perpetrators of the Holocaust. She said:

I would also like to reiterate what we said in … the last meeting [concerning Jack Phillips]. Freedom of religion and religion has been used to justify all kinds of discrimination throughout history, whether it be slavery, whether it be the Holocaust … I mean, we can list hundreds of situations where freedom of religion has been used to justify discrimination. And to me it is one of the most despicable pieces of rhetoric that people can use — to use their religion to hurt others.

Little did Rice know, Phillips’ father fought in World War II, and saw many of the Holocaust atrocities for himself. In The Daily Signal’s latest edition of “Underreported,” Phillips recounts learning about the Nazi concentration camps from his father in the years before he passed away, and describes what it was like to hear a government official compare not making a cake for a same-sex wedding to the atrocities committed during the Holocaust.

“I don’t have words for it,” Phillips told The Daily Signal. “But it’s wrong.”

 

Kelsey Harkness is a senior news producer at The Daily SignalSend an email to Kelsey@kelseyjharkness

Copyright 2017 The Daily Signal

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  • Gary

    The Rice woman accused the baker of “hurting others”. But is that true? The baker wanted to decline a business transaction. Does that hurt others? If it does, then every time Ms. Rice eats at a restaurant, she is hurting all of the other restaurants she could have eaten at. She discriminated in favor of one restaurant and against all of the other restaurants. Same thing goes for every business she spends money at. Is she “hurting others” when she shops at one business and not at others? Maybe those businesses that did not get her money would say she is, but people don’t consider that to be hurting others.

    If I decide to save my money instead of spending it, should I feel bad about “hurting others”? If you say yes, then could you offer some proof to back up your belief? And if you are right, then no one should ever save any money. Instead, they should spend every nickel they get as quickly as they can.

    Declining a business transaction, for whatever reason, is not hurting others. No one has a moral obligation to engage in a business transaction against their will. Every business transaction should be voluntary for everyone involved. If someone is forced to do business then that is unjust, and should be illegal. Civil rights laws, and commissions are designed to try to force people to do business against their will. Civil rights laws that try to force private citizens to do anything should be repealed. Then there would be no need for people to enforce bad laws that don’t exist.

  • Aliquantillus

    This is a case which demands for a lawsuit. What the Civil Rights Commissioner said is completely unacceptable.

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