Should Trump’s Evangelical Advisors Abandon Him?

Right now, I’m glad they’re still together, doing their best to give him strong counsel.

President Donald Trump, center, on stage with Liberty University President Jerry Falwell, left, after giving the commencement address for the Class of 2017 at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va., Saturday, May 13, 2017. Falwell is a member of President Trump's faith advisory council.

By Michael Brown Published on August 21, 2017

In the aftermath of the President’s comments about Charlottesville, some Republican leaders have distanced themselves from him, while a number of major business leaders have stopped supporting him. Why are the evangelical leaders on his faith advisory council still standing with him?

As reported by NPR, “President Trump’s belated and halfhearted denunciation of the hate groups that marched in Charlottesville, Virginia., has cost him the support of numerous business leaders and fellow Republicans and prompted at least a half-dozen nonprofit organizations to cancel planned fundraising events at his Mar-a-Lago resort.

“By contrast, Trump’s religious advisers have been mostly silent” — with the notable exception of Pastor A. R. Bernard of New York City. This respected mega-church pastor said, “It became obvious that there was a deepening conflict in values between myself and the administration.”

Before Rev. Bernard announced his resignation, Matthew Dowd, a “proud independent” and the Chief Political Analyst for ABC News tweeted, “Not a single member of Trump’s Evangelical Council has resigned. We have learned corporate America has a greater moral compass. So so sad.” The tweet has since gone viral.

How is it, then, that political leaders and business leaders feel the need to distance themselves from the President while these other spiritual leaders do not? Are these Christian leaders lacking in integrity? Have they sold their reputation, not to mention their souls, for a seat at the President’s table?

Of course not. Now is when President Trump needs them most, and it is very wrong to assume that their public silence reflects their private silence.

To the contrary, they are doing what faith leaders are supposed to do: praying for the President and doing their best to speak into his life, calling him to do what is right in God’s sight and is best for the nation.

To be clear, I’m not speaking officially for the faith advisory council, although I’m close to several of the men serving on that council. But I do believe that most (or all) of them will affirm what I’ve written here. It is for times like this that the council exists.

Counsel is Not Endorsement

First, let’s remember that some of the men on this council did not endorse Trump for president, and at least one told him that he was their last choice of all the Republican candidates. Why, then, do we equate their presence on a faith-based council with a sign of endorsement or approval?

Second, it is wrong to assume that these men are simply yes men who never differ with Trump or risk their good standing with him. One of these leaders has shared on my radio show that on more than one occasion he has respectfully rebuked Mr. Trump in strong and clear terms.

Isn’t it good to know that these solid, godly leaders are still doing their best to speak truth to the president? 

In fact, this evangelical leader once took the president to task so strongly that minutes later, he called back to apologize for being so forceful. At no point, though, has the President rebuffed their words or shut them out of his life.

Isn’t it good to know that these solid, godly leaders are still doing their best to speak truth to the president? Wouldn’t you want people like that having access to him? Why would they abandon him now?

Third, as a colleague said to me last week, we Christians are so quick to divorce one another the moment conflict arises. Why don’t we get in the trenches and say, “I don’t like what you said and how you said it, but I’m here to help. How can we fix this and move forward?” Why must we immediately abandon one another the moment conflict arises?

Fourth, it is ridiculous to think that ministry leaders should dance to the media’s tune. Remember: They are ministers, not politicians.

Just because the media is in a panic doesn’t mean everyone else has to be. Just because they want everyone to write Trump off as a Nazi sympathizer doesn’t mean that’s the truth.

Unfortunate Comments

When it comes to the massive controversy concerning the President’s statements about Charlottesville, I think we all agree that he should have been more clear and specific in his first statement, which pointed to violence “on many sides.”

He sought to correct this two days later when he said, “Racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including KKK, neo-Nazis, White Supremacists, and other hate groups are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans. Those who spread violence in the name of bigotry strike at the very core of America.”

Pray that the Lord would give President Trump’s advisors wisdom and clarity and that he will have ears to hear. 

Although some critics felt he was being insincere and others said it was too little too late, he did make himself perfectly clear: All these white supremacist groups are evil and he rejects them as utterly un-American.

Unfortunately, the President made another statement the next day when speaking with the press, with some clearly unscripted comments, including: “I think there is blame on both sides. You look at both sides. I think there is blame on both sides. You had some very bad people in that group. You also had some very fine people on both sides.”

This is when all hell broke loose, and it was after this that more and more leaders began to distance themselves from him.

On the one hand, having categorically denounced the Neo-Nazis and their ilk the day before, he was right to draw attention to the problems on both sides, since there certainly was blame to spread around.

On the other hand, he was quite wrong to say that there were “some very fine people on both sides.” Really? Some “very fine” neo-Nazis and KKK members?

Pray for Clarity

But is that what he meant? I personally thought he was referring to people who simply objected to the removal of Gen. Lee’s statue in distinction from the white supremacist groups, while on the “alt-left” side, he was referring to peaceful protesters who rightly objected to the “Unite the Right” rally.

This is something he needs to clarify, and I hope that these faith leaders can help him to do so.

If, in fact, he simply expressed himself in an ambiguous and confusing manner, then he can easily correct the matter, apologize, and move on, not giving further fuel for the critics’ fire.

But if he meant that there are “some very fine” neo-Nazis, White Supremacists, and KKK members, then I would expect the rest of the faith leaders to follow in A. R. Bernard’s footsteps, telling the President they can no longer be associated with him.

Right now, I’m glad they’re still together, I’m glad they’re still doing their best to give him strong counsel, and I’m glad that, in his moment of greatest need so far in his presidency, there are still servants of God ready to speak truth to power.

Pray that the Lord would give them wisdom and clarity and that President Trump will have ears to hear. It truly is a critical time for our country.

 

*Note: I fully respect Rev. Bernard’s decision and do not want to imply in any way that he forsook the President in a time of need. He has his own race to run and he answers to God on this, not you or me.

Print Friendly
Comments ()
The Stream encourages comments, whether in agreement with the article or not. However, comments that violate our commenting rules or terms of use will be removed. Any commenter who repeatedly violates these rules and terms of use will be blocked from commenting. Comments on The Stream are hosted by Disqus, with logins available through Disqus, Facebook, Twitter or G+ accounts. You must log in to comment. Please flag any comments you see breaking the rules. More detail is available here.
  • Myth Buster

    Yes, “By contrast, Trump’s religious advisers have been mostly silent …” A true Christian follows the teachings of Jesus and lives their lives as he would. Jesus would not have supported the Ratzis or KKK. That is clear. If someone doubts this they need to actually pick up and the Bible and read it. So, no it is not ridiculous to think that ministry leaders should divorce themselves from Trump when he acts in a non-Christian manner. Yes, they are ministers, not politicians and should act like they follow their faith. They should do what Jesus would. Trump had a colorful history of making offensive un-Christian like comments before getting into the White House; people allegedly of faith ignored that simply because he was their man for a number of other reasons. Well he’s now there for the next 3 1/2-years. One can either start doing as Jesus would or just keep doubling-down and keep supporting Trump and come off looking like a hypo-Christian. This is starting to look like the worst example of American religious hypocrisy in modern times.

    • Lucas Jackson

      Yes, they were just a bunch of “nice people” that decided to march with the KKK and other right wing racist groups that day. They just carried the torches. Very nice Christians marching with the racists. We should continue supporting the president who has been divorced twice because of adultery, endlessly brags about all his money and hasn’t donated to the poor in over a decade, has grabbed women simply because he thinks “it’s expected” and doesn’t seem to comprehend supporting racists is a bad thing. Now, the same people who vilified Obama simply because we didn’t know what was in his heart are still supporting Trump. It makes a lot of Christian sense to me…..

      • Linda

        Hear, hear!!

        • Chip Crawford

          Actually smear, smear. He didn’t say nice people marched WITH either hate group, but there were marchers there that were left leaning and some right, without the characteristics of the violence or ideology of the main groups.

          • Myth Buster

            Yes, he did. Trump’s stated that some of the alt-right protesters are “very nice people.” Then, while talking about Charlotte he also stated: “You have people who are very fine people on both sides,”

          • Chip Crawford

            I can’t make you not force your interpretation, but will not receive it. You provide an example of what is going on wholesale, this assigning values and meaning to people’s words, regardless of other information to the contrary, blanket condemnation of a target based on your own critical judgment. It’s exactly the way propaganda and disinformation work.

          • Myth Buster

            And your denial of objective reality in addition to the simple comprehension of the English language, just to maintain an odd unfounded endless support of Trump, in the face of mounting and growing evidence, is extremely idiotic. It’s exactly the way cult groups react when rejecting known Planet Earth like well grounded facts. Sad……

          • Chip Crawford

            Why not go ahead and call me a racist along with all of this …Isn’t that part of the Saul Alinsky playbook, to keep the accusing going, pounding, pounding, beating down, fighting in the streets, fighting, hating, accusing until everyone is numb with it

          • Myth Buster

            I haven’t done that yet, but you seem to just keeping walking into the self appointed racist lawyer mode, over and over again.

    • Hmmm…

      How about actually reading the Bible you think slams those who see things differently from you. If you were to do so, you would find what Jesus actually thought and said and did. He actually gave mercy to sinners, the worst, those condemned with the harsh judgment you are using right now. He condemned and “called out,” we would say now, the Pharisees for their hardness of heart, calling them hypocrites. The scriptures on judging people point out that those judging are doing the same things – sinning themselves and falling short, being hypocrites. God is love. He has power and he will judge. But he is the judge, not us, and it says to judge no one before the time. That’s God’s time, not ours. Seems like you’ve sided in with the religious elite of Jesus’ day. Are you sure you want to be in that company? He went on to speak of the reward of their wicked hearts, which was again, his harshest.

      Nor the least of this is that the claims and charges are mainly spurious and without merit.

      • Myth Buster

        “How about actually reading the Bible …” I have. Yes, Jesus did give “mercy to sinners”; however, he did not placate them nor support their transgressions. He was consistent on his messaging. Jesus, based upon the four Gospels, would not have supported the Ratzis or the KKK. He may have forgiven them afterwards, but not support them. There is an obvious difference.

        Yes, it clear the scriptures do not like people judging and point out that those judging are doing the same things – sinning themselves and falling short, being hypocrites. Wonder why the Christian Right never took that idea to heart during the Obama Administration.

        So, I guess you have not made a judgement on the KKK or Ratzis. Odd history has been very clear on judging them and somehow you missed all of that. Seems like you’ve sided in with the religious ignorant. “If anyone thinks he is religious and does not bridle his tongue but deceives his heart, this person’s religion is worthless.” James 1:26 Sorry, but I will not bridle my tongue. Or, “Do not be unequally yoked with unbelievers. For what partnership can righteousness have with wickedness? Or what fellowship does light have with darkness?” Corinthians 6:14 Now that one is to the point and obvious.

        I think you need to try rereading the Good Book or take a reading comprehension course.

      • Patmos

        A reply to Myth Buster’s moderated troll post:

        “A true Christian follows the teachings of Jesus and lives their lives as he would. Jesus would not have supported the Ratzis or KKK.”

        And Trump supports those groups? With his Jewish daughter and son in law?

        You are full of crap. Try busting your own myths.

        • Myth Buster

          Now that made sense….

          • Patmos

            I love how you just retreat into nothing when you have lost.

          • Myth Buster

            First off, I’m not not retreating. Secondly, you’re idiotic comments have not produced any type of victory. Wow! What idiotic delusions of grandeur.

          • Chip Crawford

            Naw, he knows there’s no grandeur in deluding an idiot … just saying …

          • Myth Buster

            Yes, that all “just saying….”

          • Mensa Member

            Somebody is flagging your (and my) posts just because they disagree.

          • Myth Buster

            I know. This is how so called Christians respond to counter arguments. Just more proof they’re actually hypo-Christians.

  • Hmmm…

    There’s nothing enabling about standing with someone in the bad times as well as the good times. That is what commitment does. I know of some who have spoken to the President’s faults, and this group has the capability of confrontation, as needed. God is patient with all of us, giving us a chance to catch on, repent and come to him to change us. He’s doing the same with the President, whether his haters understand that or not. These men and women of God are actually showing their virtue and high caliber by not turning and running when things get tough and their motives are being impugned.

  • davidrev17

    WOW! As I’ve continued to read all these comments on ‘The Stream’ the last several days, by so-called Christians, re: the events in the Charlottesville area, one thought continually comes to mind: I sure am glad that we “Pharisees in-the-mirror” – aren’t God Himself; even though oftentimes I’ve noticed, that we speak & write as though we think we are THE omniscient “One.”

  • tether

    Seems to me that if one is in a role where they have the opportunity to influence the president, that is a good thing. Especially if one does not agree with the actions of the president at that time. If you want to change things then why would you close the door on an opportunity to influence those things? However, if one wants to change things they would be best served by approaching the issues with tact and discipline, not like a bull. After all the position of POTUS is deserving of respect. One doesn’t have to agree with or even like the person in the position to show the position the respect it deserves.
    This would be true for anyone else who has the opportunity for an advisory, or consulting role. Leaders of opposing nations meet when they disagree in hopes to maintain peaceful terms that both sides can live with. If you disagree with the president then work to influence him. Don’t be like a child who takes their ball and goes home because they didn’t get their way.

  • Mensa Member

    Trump has been an epic moral failure for Evangelical Christianity.

    It’s depressingly predictable that this is only now dawning on Dr. Brown.

    Their support of Trump — even as The World is showing higher morals — is a shame for the church history books.

    To be fair, it’s (not yet!) the worst thing the church has done but that’s a very low moral bar.

    Just in the modern era:

    Southern Christians supporting slavery and segregation
    The German churches supporting Hitler.
    Christian sectarian terrorism in Ireland.
    Christian slaughtering Muslims in Bosnia
    The Christians Hutus committing genocide against the Tutsis.
    Anti-LGBT crusades and persecutions
    The Catholic church pedophilia scandal.

    As horrific as those are, Evangelical support of Trump still might make the list.

    What makes this such a failure for the church is that millions of “heathens” immediately recognized Trump’s extreme lack of morals.

    But conservative Christians supported him anyway! (Most of us think Evangelicals saw his immorality, too, but winning was more important to them.)

    No, Trump is not Hitler. But if he was, The World now thinks that conservative Christians would probably still be his base.

    • Laura Ann Register

      You ers there. You need to be very, very care of what you are saying about President Trump and about the church all togehter. He says what is on his mind and God Himself has hand picked him to help this nation get back on her feet. He said nothing WRONG! Everyone was at fault and no one was innocent! I’m sure I will hear back from you and hear a few words that are not what God wants you to say but that’s okay. I will forgive you like He tells me to do and I will love you as He loves you.

      • Patmos

        Mensa Member is a fake Christian troll with an agenda. Nothing he says is sincere or with even an ounce of truth. He is a liar and a supporter of abominations. If The Stream staff was wise it would ban him.

        • Mensa Member

          Please stop attacking me. And lying about me.

          • Face it, Mensa Member–being an anonymous troll tempts people to attack you. It could help if you post under your own name, and challenge those who disagree with you to do the same. That would be better than identifying as Mensa Member, which just makes it look like you are trying to enhance your credibility by saying you scored in the top two percent on an IQ test.

            But Mensa membership really doesn’t mean much since around six million people in the USA could qualify. And since there are only 50,000 US Mensa members, less than one percent who qualify actually join. That suggests that this membership doesn’t have a lot of value among people who do qualify. If you want to be more credible, get advanced degrees from some top-tier universities, and then publish a lot of articles in peer reviewed journals.

            And by the way when you accuse people of lying about you, you should specifically identify the lies rather than just complaining about being lied about.

          • Myth Buster

            How would Patmos know Mensa Member is a “fake Christian troll”?

          • Mensa Member

            Myth,

            Patmost is bearing false witness against me in direct violation of the Bible.

            I am most certainly not a fake Christian.

            I am a born again, Evangelical Christian. I have been a pastor, missionary and (Evangelical) denominational leader. I pray, worship, and study the bible all the time and have done so my whole adult life.

            I have told Patmos this and he keeps bearing false witness against me. Now it seems like Ralph is joining him.

            Best I can guess, he lies about me because he simply because he can’t tolerate a Christian disagreeing with him on his pet issues.

          • You should ask Patmos about that, not me. And by the way I have criticized Patmos more than once on The Stream and suggested he post under his real name.

        • Concerned Christian

          does it matter? 🙂

          Don’t we want dialog that forces us to defend our position?

      • Mensa Member

        >> God Himself has hand picked him to help this nation

        Some people interpret Romans 13 to say that all leaders are ordained by God.

        But the Old Testament makes it clear that some leaders are evil in the eyes of the Lord.

      • stan schmunk

        Heather Heyer was at fault? She attended an evangelical church! And you don’t know why God brought Trump to the presidency…

        • Laura Ann Register

          I don’t know why God brought Trump to Presidency? Ah, yeah, I do. God wants a man in the White House who will not back down from anyone and someone who is going to listen to God. A man that loves God first then his family and then this Nation and her people. God also wanted someone in there that was not afraid to get his hands dirty by draining the swamp. God has taken His Nation back and through President Trump God can do His Will in this Great Nation of ours. I’m not going to argue with you or anyone else about this. That is exactly what the devil wants and I won’t give it to him. God was preparing President Trump for this task even when he was just a little boy. Once he announced that he was running for Presidency, the Giant started to wake up and once he won, the Giant woke up. The Giant is the the Body of Christ. If you have different reason why, then by all means believe it. But YES, I do know why!

          • Chip Crawford

            I think Mr. Trump’s thinking and positioning on issues and values are lined up in general with soundness and purpose, but the person himself is not as sound as he might be. Fact is, God doesn’t have any perfect people to call on. But Mr. Trump’s vision is right. And that threatens those on the other side to the point that they are pulling out the stops against him like never before. He ain’t perfect, but he’s not the devil they portray. No, he’s a carrier of the purpose and vision and needs our support, especially in prayer. The glory goes to the Father, who purposes on our behalf to work the greater good, with those who are available, if not perfect.

    • Myth Buster

      You forgot about the Church’s support for Mussolini’s attack on Ethiopia in 1935 and then fascism in Spain a year later.

      • Mensa Member

        >>> You forgot about the Church’s support for Mussolini’s attack on Ethiopia in 1935 and then Spain a year later.

        I was going to mention the Catholic church’s support of Mussolini and fascism in general but I didn’t want to pile-on. I wasn’t aware of Ethiopia but I have read about the church being supportive of Spanish fascism.

      • I get so tired of the “your side did that” type of arguments. Let’s condemn all violence from all sides. If you want to talk about Fascism in Spain in the 1930s, you should also condemn violence by leftist groups too. The Wikipedia article on Red Terror (Spain) cites an estimate by a historian of “4,184 priests, 2,365 members of other religious institutes and 283 nuns” being killed. The article also mentions “106 burned churches and 56 churches otherwise destroyed.”

        • Myth Buster

          I also get so tired of the “your side did that” type of arguments. I wish you were around when Obama was in office. There was an endless amount of idiotic Benghazi stupidity, he was born in Kenya foolishness and the “server” and the e-mails that “put the country at risk” garbage. Yes, you are correct.

          It is true. Neither side holds the total moral high ground, the right, the left or the religious people; however, the Ratzis really crossed the moral low ground in the 1940s wouldn’t you agree? Or, are you asserting that the Holocaust was a crime on an equal scale with the left crimes during the Spanish Civil War? Normally I wouldn’t ask this question since I know have the average educated adult would say, but I’d like to hear your response. Please ….

          • Mensa Member

            >>> I get so tired of the “your side did that” type of arguments.

            It’s this logic that I find morally appalling. In almost every conflict,
            both sides do wrong. America did wrong in WWII. Germany did
            wrong.

            But those wrongs were not equal!

          • Myth Buster

            Couldn’t agree with you more. Ratzi-Germany established an ideology and eventually a national policy to eliminate an entire race. There are no equals in the 20th Century – with the exception of the Armenian Holocaust, but I believe that was not an example of a national policy that would have extended beyond those boundaries. These people that are launching this goofy moral equivalency argument seem to lack a moral compass and a lot of formal education.

          • I just responded but it’s on hold. To avoid the automated moderation, perhaps I need to just refer to “the German leader in the 1930s and 1940s” rather than using his name? And not use the commonly used name for his ideology? While waiting you could check out the Wikipedia article titled Mass killings under Communist regimes.

          • Here’s my response, Myth Buster. I edited it to hopefully avoid moderation.

            Since you just shifted the issue from Spain in the 1930s to Germany, let’s also also look at leftism outside of Spain. See the Wikipedia article titled “Mass killings under Communist regimes.” And if you don’t like that article, and the sources referenced, there are plenty of other articles and well-researched books that show the same.

            Quoting from the Wikipedia article, “Daniel Goldhagen argues that 20th century Communist regimes ‘have killed more people than any other regime type.’ Other scholars in the fields of Communist studies and genocide studies, such as Steven Rosefielde, Benjamin Valentino, and R.J. Rummel, have come to similar conclusions. Rosefielde states that it is possible the ‘Red Holocaust’ killed more non-combatants than ‘Ha Shoah’ and ‘Japan’s Asian holocaust’ combined, and ‘was at least as heinous, given the singularity of [German leader’s] genocide.’ Rosefielde also notes that ‘while it is fashionable to mitigate the Red Holocaust by observing that capitalism killed millions of colonials in the twentieth century, primarily through man-made famines, no inventory of such felonious negligent homicides comes close to the Red Holocaust total.'”

            You think you are going to convince people that you are tired of “your side did that” arguments by putting up another one? Perhaps you should read up on the Tu quoque logical fallacy.

            And by the way, are you afraid to identify yourself with your real name? Also you said, “people that are launching this goofy moral equivalency argument seem to lack a moral compass and a lot of formal education.” Since you raised the qualifications issue, please tell us all the university degrees you earned and from what schools, as well as your publishing record.

          • Myth Buster

            Good try. I never said the communists didn’t kill more people then the Ratzis. We didn’t see any communist flags in Charlottesville, however. We’re comparing the moral equivalency of the Ratzis and the anti-fastists (that are not necessarily communists). You know in WWII the US opposed Germany and we were anti-fascists and not communists. So, I don’t really understand your point.

            Secondly, if you wish to post addressed comments to me don’t send them to yourself. I can respond to them in a more efficient manner.

          • Concerned Christian

            the big difference is that the Church states that it’s moral authority derives from God. Communist regimes never state this. Stalin and Mao killed all the Christians, all the intellectuals, and pretty much any other group that could be identified.

            Nationalist regimes derive their power from the church. We don’t hear of any great leaders speaking out against Hitler, Mussolini, Franco, or slavery in this country. These regimes are very specific in who they target as the enemy. Normally, it someone the church hates.

            If you claim moral authority that derives from God, you are held to a different standard.

          • Hi Concerned Christian:

            “We don’t hear of any great leaders speaking out against Hitler, Mussolini, Franco, or slavery in this country. These regimes are very specific in who they target as the enemy. Normally, it someone the church hates.”

            Dietrich Bonhoeffer was a great leader who did everything he could–including taking part in an assassination plot and ultimately being executed–to stop the regime in Germany.

            See the Wikipedia article titled German resistance to [that ideology]: “Though neither the Catholic nor Protestant churches as institutions were prepared to openly oppose the [ideology] State, it was from the clergy that the first major component of the German Resistance to the policies of the Third [regime] emerged, and the churches as institutions provided the earliest and most enduring centres of systematic opposition to [ideology] policies.”

            And as for the church hating people, the Catholic Church understandably didn’t have warm fuzzy feelings toward those who were killing priests and nuns. The Nationalists also killed some Protestant ministers as well as Catholic priests associated with the Republicans. So your narrative about regimes oppressing those whom the church hates looks dubious.

            As for slavery in this country, the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution was contrary to Deuteronomy 32:15-16. “If a slave has taken refuge with you, do not hand them over to their master. Let them live among you wherever they like and in whatever town they choose. Do not oppress them.” That Constitutional clause was clearly a huge mistake whose price was paid in the blood of over 600,000 who died and many more who were wounded.

            By the way what’s your real name?

          • Concerned Christian

            In terms of who the church hates, that was really directed at the minorities in these countries. I.e. neither German Protestants nor Catholics stood up for the Jews, and white Christians in the south didn’t stand up for blacks.

            Of course when it affects you personally, you will stand up. I.e. the number of republicans who find gay marriage acceptable when someone close to them “comes out”.

            I agree that we have paid an enduring price for the mistake of slavery. For me all issues that we have today over rights derive from the fact that blacks had to fight to prove that we deserved access to the rights guaranteed in the constitution. It created a wedge that the devil has been able to exploit since the founding of the country.

            In terms of my name, i prefer my anonymity. I’m a bit paranoid when it comes to the web. My kids love the irony since I actually work in IT. 🙂

          • Hi Concerned Christian:

            “neither German Protestants nor Catholics stood up for the Jews, and white Christians in the south didn’t stand up for blacks”

            Some didn’t, some did. You don’t have to look very hard to find well-documented stories of Protestants and Catholics in Germany and elsewhere who did stand up for the Jews. And there were white Christians in the south who did stand up for blacks–for example, Jimmy Carter.

            If you want to to say that not enough people who claimed to be Christians stood up for the oppressed, that’s fine. But please don’t say or imply that none did in the groups you identify. It’s intellectually sloppy at best, and dishonest at worst.

          • Myth Buster

            Yes, I’ve experienced the same problem and that’s why I use Ratzi instead of their formal names.

            Of course, the Stalinist Regime did large amounts of mass killing in the 1930s, but the protestors last weekend were not carrying any Hammer and Cycle flags or promoting that ideology. Many political parties (right and left) were also in the anti-fascist organizations.

          • I didn’t say or suggest that the counter-protestors in Charlottesville were Communists. And if leftists and progressives, whatever, want to solve the problems in this country here’s a starting point: stop saying, suggesting or implying that all or most conservatives have an ideology that is similar to that one in Germany in the 1930s and 1940s. The people that started that demonstration in Charlottesville had that ideology, but most conservatives don’t.

            By the way, Myth Buster, what’s your real name?

          • Myth Buster

            Really! So the Ratzis and the KKK don’t have an ideology similar to that one in Germany in the 1930s and 1940s. You’re saying the people walking around with the old German flags don’t share their ideology. Well then, are they just idiots? Secondly, I never said that all or most conservatives have an ideology that is similar to that one in Germany. Please stop putting words in my mouth.

            Yes, most conservatives don’t have the same ideology that the Ratzis did in the 1930s. So, I’d suggest they shouldn’t try defending them or acting like they’re on the same moral equivalence as the anti-fascist protestors.

          • Hi Myth Buster:

            “You’re saying the people walking around with the old German flags don’t share their ideology.”

            I said that? Please provide the exact quote where I said something even remotely equivalent to that.

            Does posting under an alias make it easier for you to claim people said something they didn’t say?

          • Myth Buster

            My mistake. I misread your other comment. Yes, most conservatives don’t have the same ideology that the Ratzis did in the 1930s; however, those walking around in Charlottesville with the old flags did have that ideology.

            No, posting under an alias doesn’t make it easier for someone to claim people said something they didn’t say. Wow! That was a huge leap of logic. It just stops unstable people from looking me up. Do you have the same problem with conservatives posting with alias usernames and also using straw-man arguments? Because we have many of them doing it on this very webpage. Why don’t you ask that same question of them? Or. are you one of these selective fake right wing outrage kind of guys that posts comments like that to just deflect?

          • ” Wow! That was a huge leap of logic.”
            It wasn’t a conclusion, it was a rhetorical question. It’s quite interesting to see how people react to such questions.

            I’m trusting in Jesus to protect me from unstable people. Not to mention that the odds of some unstable person actually finding you based on comments on the 32,699th (varies over time–see Alexa Traffic Statistics) most popular website in the US are pretty low. So …

            I see aliases all the time with conservatives and I call them on it, as I’ve done with Patmos more than once here. I wish The Stream would make it a policy to require all commenters to identify themselves–I think it would improve the quality of discussion a lot.

          • Myth Buster

            You see aliases all the time with conservatives and I call them on it. Okay, there are some on this webpage. Do it here to. If you’re trusting in Jesus to protect you from unstable people – great! I hope it works out for you, but I’ll keep my alias.

            I’ve got news for you. Eliminating aliases will not make the discussions go more smoothly. I have no idea where you got that correlation. They have nothing in common. Or, are you just looking for an excuse because your argument hasn’t gone they way you’d have liked them to?

          • Chip Crawford

            Anyone as caustic as MB should take all precautions. The hatefulness and strife directed at others is not conducive to having divine protection. He also may be the most unstable person on here.

          • Myth Buster

            LOL!!!! Another great job of deflection. You also followed Ralph’s lead wonderfully. I really loved the “hatefulness and strife directed at others” comment too. You’re killing me. Can’t defend the Ratzis and the KKK, so you resort to this type of childish come-back. You should just quit while you’re behind. Any intelligent person would say stubborn persistence doesn’t always pay off. Now please, just go away or just watch Fox News all day and get new talking points.

          • Lucas Jackson

            You’ll note that their standard tactic when confronted by facts or sound counterarguments: deflect, deflect, deflect! Now they want to talk about the problems of aliases on the website, but only seem to have problems with it when those on the left have them.

          • Chip Crawford

            I always do a great job, turkey. Talk about having a stuck needle in the same groove. Turn the page on that Saul Alinsky book. Study up on another Satanic, ungodly technique and see if you do any better

          • Myth Buster

            Is this your new Fox News talking point?

          • Chip Crawford

            See, no substance. Stuck in that groove and can’t get out. Bashing and thrashing around, losing ground.

          • Myth Buster

            LOL!!!! You’re just deflecting and claiming someone else’s comments have “no substance”! LOL!!!!!!!! This is the best you got? Can’t stick to the topic, so you think deflection will work. Sorry!

          • Chip Crawford

            You are a sorry soul. God love you; he’d love to take your case. Why don’t you let him? BTW, do you ever have a topic besides propaganda and disinformation? No. Topic; what a joke. The hater claims to have an actual “topic.” Keep reaching in your bag of tricks, but I have actual things to do, so may not respond to the next salvo. I try to since you need my good input, anything to try to help your desperate condition. Again, sorry soul …

          • Myth Buster

            More deflection! Good try….

          • Dear MB:

            “see aliases all the time with conservatives … call them on it. Okay, there are some on this webpage. Do it here to.”

            It didn’t work with you, why should you expect it to work with others? As mentioned above, I think this is an issue for the people who run this web site.

            “I’ve got news for you. Eliminating aliases will not make the discussions go more smoothly.”

            That’s a statement that can be tested. Do you have empirical evidence to back it up? Anecdotally I do find that using my own name makes me more concerned about what I say and how I say it, not to mention trying to avoid spelling and grammar errors. And it fits in well with Biblical teaching on controlling one’s communications.

            “Or, are you just looking for an excuse because your argument hasn’t gone they way you’d have liked them to?”

            I find people who imply an ability to see into others’ minds very interesting. So please provide evidence to back up your claim that my argument hasn’t gone the way I’d have liked.

          • Myth Buster

            Great job deflecting away from the issue we were discussing that was the topic of the article. Sorry, but I wish to stay on topic and don’t buy into your selective concern over aliases that liberals use.

          • Lucas Jackson

            You need to call that childish behavior out when it’s seen. You’ll note that their standard tactic when confronted by facts or sound counterarguments: deflect, deflect, deflect! Now they want to talk about the problems of aliases on the website, but only seem to have problems with it when those on the left have them. It’s kind of funny how that works.

          • Dear Lucas:

            Thank you for identifying yourself with something that could be a real name. Are you the photojournalist?

            “only seem to have problems with it when those on the left have them”
            You really should review previous posts before making statements that can so easily be refuted. As shown in multiple posts above, I do criticize those on the right. By the way can you give examples of your calling out liberals here or elsewhere, or are you operating on selective concern more than you say I am?

          • Myth Buster

            I don’t think too many people are going to do an extensive review of past posts before making a comment to you on the issue of aliases. Again, more deflection.

          • Chip Crawford

            Another peep from the creep. He just saw the word “deflection” somewhere, and is so eager to use it as much as he can … He’s a one-trick pony as a rule. He’ll wear it out and eventually go to some other insult in his low life vocabulary.

          • Myth Buster

            Yes, it also happens to be a word in the dictionary that has a meaning. Now I know Trump only knows 300 words. Are you also linguistically challenged?

          • Chip Crawford

            Yeeees, you’re finding out about new things, trying to be less stupid. Goooood …. Maybe if you keep it up, you can get a real job and not have to be a creepy troll. Goooood …

          • Myth Buster

            You’re the “I love Jesus” Bible Thumper that’s tap-dancing around supporting the Ratzis and KKK, and still maintaining fidelity to Trump; yet, you’re claiming I’m trying to act “less stupid”!!! LOL!!!!!!!!!!! You must have been deprived of oxygen during birth. Now, please stop posting to me I’m a heterosexual and not interested.

          • Chip Crawford

            Foul to the core, Oh, fetid breath. “Ohhh, stop bothering me … ” Wimp. Maybe still in high school, with the LOL!!!! shtick.

          • Myth Buster

            You’re the one posting to me, Trolly Dolly. I’m not a Log cabin member. Stop posting to me. I’m a heterosexual.

          • Chip Crawford

            YOU just posted to me …. STOOOOOOPP, get it, pest ??? BACK OFF !!!! This is a decent site. Participants here don’t have to put up with trailer trash anarchists bused in courtesy of George Soros.

          • Hi Myth Buster:

            “Great job deflecting away from the issue we were discussing that was the topic of the article.”
            When I respond relevantly to things people say I’m deflecting? Really?

            “Sorry, but I wish to stay on topic and don’t buy into your selective concern over aliases that liberals use.”
            I’ve mentioned multiple times that I’ve criticized Patmos here. How is that selective concern? Can you give examples of your calling out liberals here, or are you operating on selective concern more than you say I am?

          • Myth Buster

            First off, I don’t care if you’ve mention to him multiple times or not. Secondly, you haven’t don it on this website as you have with me. Nevertheless, it’s still deflection.

            No I can’t give any examples of “calling out liberals here” for obvious reasons. I’m not debating an issue with them.

          • Hi Myth Buster:

            “No I can’t give any examples of ‘calling out liberals here’ for obvious reasons. I’m not debating an issue with them.”

            In other words you don’t care if someone on your side of the fence does something you think is wrong? Perhaps you should take an ethics class. And consider that when people on your side do things they shouldn’t, it reflects poorly on your cause–just as Antifa members’ frequent public endorsements of violence reflects poorly on its cause.

            See the CNN article titled What is Antifa? which includes the following excerpts:

            Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino [said about Antifa]:
            “What they’re trying to do now is not only become prominent through violence at these high-profile rallies, but also to reach out through small meetings and through social networking to cultivate disenfranchised progressives who heretofore were peaceful.”

            Crow, who was involved with Antifa for almost 30 years, said members use violence as a means of self-defense and they believe property destruction does not equate to violence. “There is a place for violence. Is that the world that we want to live in? No. Is it the world we want to inhabit? No. Is it the world we want to create? No. But will we push back? Yes,” Crow said.

          • Myth Buster

            There was some liberals that crossed party lines and backed Free Trade when the Republicans pushed it during the early 1990s. Clinton should not have crossed party lines to sign it into law. There you go.

            I haven’t heard you call out a conservative for doing something wrong. Please give me an example in return.

            No one is debating that Antifa also uses violence to achieve their political goals. You keep trying to go back to that point like you’ve got some type of trump card. The issue focusses on there is no moral equivalency between Antifa and the Ratzis (the latter is far worse), in addition to Trump’s idiotic comments on Charlottesville. You seem to duck-and-dodge and not admit to the obvious and fail to agree with the non-moral equivalency issue and Trump’s idiotic comment. Please, if you can’t bring yourself to agree with that statement just don’t respond. I don’t have time to engage in a pointless, immature conversation with someone that refuses to admit the obvious and oxymoronically plays the role as a Christian.

          • Myth Buster

            Wow! Someone is playing the flagging game so here it is again:

            There was some liberals that crossed party lines and backed Free Trade when the Republicans pushed it during the early 1990s. Clinton should not have crossed party lines to sign it into law. There you go.

            I haven’t heard you call out a conservative for doing something wrong. Please give me an example in return.

            No one is debating that Antifa also uses violence to achieve their political goals. You keep trying to go back to that point like you’ve got some type of trump card. The issue focusses on there is no moral equivalency between Antifa and the Ratzis (the latter is far worse), in addition to Trump’s idiotic comments on Charlottesville. You seem to duck-and-dodge and not admit to the obvious and fail to agree with the non-moral equivalency issue and Trump’s idiotic comment. Please, if you can’t bring yourself to agree with that statement just don’t respond. I don’t have time to engage in a pointless, immature conversation with someone that refuses to admit the obvious and oxymoronically plays the role as a Christian.

          • Hi Myth Buster:

            I tried to post this in response to your (duplicated?) replies to my post below. However it wouldn’t go through, so I’m posting it here.

            You said, “The issue focusses on there is no moral equivalency between Antifa and the Ratzis (the latter is far worse), in addition to Trump’s idiotic comments on Charlottesville.”

            I agree the Ratzis are bad, and that Trump made a very serious mistake in what he said about Charlottesville.

            The issue focuses on what I said in a post above, “Let’s condemn all violence from all sides.” That doesn’t imply a moral equivalence between different types of violence, it just says that non-violence is way better than violence. Non-violence is way better than Ratzi violence, Communist violence, ISIS violence, conservative violence, liberal violence, etc. Are you OK with that? And do you agree that Antifa should stop encouraging and using violence as a political tactic?

          • Myth Buster

            The reason there are duplicate replies is because some of our so-called Christians seem to be playing the flagging game with selected liberal comments. I guess God must have told them to do this.

            “I agree the Ratzis are bad, and that Trump made a very serious mistake in what he said about Charlottesville.” Yes, that true. It shouldn’t have taken you this long to admit the obvious.

            “Let’s condemn all violence from all sides.” I’ve agreed with that statement several times. You are not the only one that has stated this type of comment. The issue is about moral equivalency between the anti-fascist or Antifa protesters and the Ratzis. There is none. If you think there is or could be, there’s a need on your part to pick up a book on the Ratzis’ ideology, history, crimes and read it. Please don’t repeat the crimes of the communists during Stalinistic times, Antifa is not politically aligned with that period or political party. They do not carry communist flags and anti-fascist forces historically have also been conservative too.

            Yes, Antifa should stop encouraging and using violence as a political tactic, just as the Ratzis and KKK should also do that too. Would you agree the Ratzis and KKK should denounce violence and their hateful racist anti-Christian ideologies? If yes, we’re done – we have no further debate.

  • TruthTeller (Deplorable)

    President Trump also clearly stated that he would prefer to comment after receiving all the facts of what really happened. His predecessor was quick to speak after a perceived racial injustice, and when the facts were presented, his words and pre-judgements of the incident were mostly proven to be wrong. There are good people who disapprove of a re-writing of our history. Statues standing somewhere in the southern states have not prevented the great strides seen in race relations and equality over the past 60 years. If the leftists want to riot with the intention of silencing all voices who disagree with their ideology, the nation will suffer the consequences. Christianity will suffer the consequences. Americans must be careful in believing all that the leftist media portray as the mood of an entire nation. Scripted and arranged “protests” shown continuously in the news do not accurately portray the mood in the part of America where I live. I am sure you could advertise and scrounge up a crowd here to be filmed as protesters, but otherwise, life here goes on peacefully every day.

    • Mensa Member

      >> President Trump also clearly stated that he would prefer to comment after receiving all the facts of what really happened.

      He doesn’t do that for anything else. (Well, except Russia)

      Why would he do it for Nazis and Klansmen?

      • Myth Buster

        it’s kind of funny that Trump has been know to quickly comment on Muslim terrorism before all the facts are in; yet, someone needs days to make judgement on white supremacist racist violence. Interesting double standard and yet he still shoots himself in the foot.

        • Patmos

          Just because Trump didn’t condemn them like you wanted doesn’t mean he didn’t condemn them. The only funny thing here is all the people overlooking the fact that he has a Jewish daughter and son in law before trying to claim he somehow supports or is okay with far right hate groups. Were you too busy busting myths to think that one through?

          • Myth Buster

            He remained silent for a few days; then gave a wimpy condemnation; then a few days later said both sides had the same moral equivalency. So, yes, he didn’t condemn them like would have liked a US President to have done. Yes, “he has a Jewish daughter and son in law” that makes some of his actions even more puzzling. Thanks, you are correct and have pointed out that oxymoronic fact.

          • Patmos

            “said both sides had the same moral equivalency”

            He didn’t say that, the press implied it, and then lemmings like you ran with it. You literally just had a thought planted in your head, a myth no less. You do realize that don’t you? Even after me pointing it out to you in broad daylight?

          • Myth Buster

            You’re correct. Trump didn’t actually literally say that. But, people who understand the English language grasped the “moral equivalency” theme of his statement. You are posting from somewhere in the USA and do understand the English language, right?

          • Myth Buster

            You’re correct. Trump didn’t actually literally say that. But, people who understand the English language grasped the “moral equivalency” theme of his statement. You are posting from somewhere in the USA and do understand the English language, right?

          • Az1seeit

            I distinctly remember him denouncing the violence that day. He was right! All the rest of this is just ginned up outrage to sling mud on him! Trust me, I was not a Trumpist, but I am sick of all the garbage made out of whole cloth to destroy him! There’s simply nothing at all behind this hysteria!

          • Myth Buster

            He first denounced the violence two days afterwards. Then, said there was “some good people” who marched with the Ratzis. It’s far from being simple ginned up outrage to sling mud.

          • Az1seeit

            Myth….no pun intended…he denounced it that day from all sides. But because his opposition has tried to paint him with a nazi/white supremacist brush since the campaign, their hair is on fire because he wasn’t specific. This is why this is a “thing” at all. The other reason is people don’t “get” him. Some of us realize he doesn’t think in the Balkanized divisive way politics has become and understand his first statement said all that was needed for him. Again, understand I am not defending him. I am sick to death of false hysteria and truly frightened of the ease with which our country is inflamed by the irresponsible fanning if it.

          • Myth Buster

            Sorry you can’t handle reality. Got this easily off the internet: “It took him long enough — in fact, too long. Two days after a protest in Charlottesville, Va., dissolved into violence, President Trump — who initially seemed to see no difference between the racists and Nazis who had called the march and the counterdemonstrators opposing them — finally denounced the hard-right for what it is.” It’s easy to look up too.

          • Az1seeit

            Okay. Let’s say you saw something. Then I heard a report about it and claimed it was true and told you about it. And you said I saw it, you’re wrong. And I said But you can look it up. This is what happened. Im sorry you can’t handle reality.

            What would you tell me?

          • Jim Walker

            You are talking to those who speak words that didn’t go through thought process. They are emotion driven, absolutely poor in comprehension, read only the parts that justify their ideology and only wants to win a debate at all cost and if they failed, they go into chanting.

          • Myth Buster

            Wow! You create a theoretical analogy and then say this is what happened. Are you the president of your planet?

          • Jim Walker

            There are some good people. Why shouldn’t there be ?
            Go read more about Robert E Lee and you will understand why. Don’t just trust what the MSM spews.

          • Myth Buster

            Sure! There’s a lot of “good people” that consciously march with the Ratzis and KKK. I believe that one.

          • Myth Buster

            Good people march with the KKK???? What?

          • Myth Buster

            Sorry, he did not do that.

          • Az1seeit

            I’m sorry you believe that.

          • Myth Buster

            Sorry you can’t handle reality. Got this easily off the internet: “It took him long enough — in fact, too long. Two days after a protest in Charlottesville, Va., dissolved into violence, President Trump — who initially seemed to see no difference between the racists and Nazis who had called the march and the counterdemonstrators opposing them — finally denounced the hard-right for what it is.”

          • Jim Walker

            Too fast, you complain, too slow, you complain. Must he ask you when is the appropriate time ?
            I find you too fast in your criticism. snail-crawling slow to give credit when credit is due.
            Your mind is basically so in tune by the MSM, you don’t think much anymore.

          • Myth Buster

            Look who is talking?

  • Concerned Christian

    I understand prayer and standing with someone.

    It’s funny but Trump is like an undisciplined child and those leaders are like bad parents. He keeps doing bad, probably tells the leaders he won’t do it again, the leaders listen and want to believe and just like an undisciplined child, he continues to disappoint and make them look silly.

    Most of these leaders and I’m sure Dr. Brown himself would at some point tell the parents that it’s time for some touch love.

    A few more resignations should get his attention. It will at least get the attention of republicans. If this doesn’t make him change nothing will!

    • Myth Buster

      Well said!!!!!!

    • Hmmm…

      God is slooooooooooooooow to wrath, long suffering … It hasn’t been all that long. Both of our choices for the office were severely flawed. There is the distinct possibility that this increasingly less Godly nation is getting the leadership it deserves. The word says blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord. Our nation has kicked God out of its public arenas, saying we don’t want you, but demands its own way, essentially that it be blessed. In many ways, our nation is an undisciplined child without even saying I was wrong and won’t do it again, which we are not at all sure Mr. Trump does. The nation may be getting what it has earned by its own childish and self-centered behavior.

      • Mensa Member

        >> Both of our choices for the office were severely flawed

        It’s this false moral-equivalence that has given us arguably the most unqualified president in US history.

        Trump serially abused women. Trump lies and misrepresents with stunning frequency. Trump has a record of racial discrimination. Trump built his campaign on racism. Trump quite possibly colluded with our enemy to subvert democracy.

        Hillary had an email server.

        THESE ARE NOT THE SAME!!!!!

  • Laura Ann Register

    The reason why the Evangelicals are not abandoning the President is because they know that He is one that God has put in Authority and they are praying for him continually. He said Nothing WRONG! Everyone was guilty, if there are those that want to turn their backs on him, then let them, but any one who is a pastor or an Evangelist, they won’t. That one pastor that did. He WILL have to answer to God for what he has done and he has made a grave mistake. Anyone who speaks out against any of God’s Annoited Ones, they will be dealt with by God Himself! Our Pastor, Kenneth Copeland and his wife are just 2 of them that make up the Presidents Evangelical Spiritual Team. Don’t like it? Deal with it and then when you stand in front of Jesus on Judgement Day, and He asks you why you spoke out against President Donald J. Trump, you had better have a good reason why, because you will be judge for that. I’m not judging you, I’m speaking the truth! And I forgive everyone who is or who might want to speak against him.

    • Mensa Member

      >> He said Nothing WRONG! Everyone was guilty,

      No offense but your “both sides” argument is severely lacking in moral judgment.

      I’m sure you are a highly moral person in other parts of your life but but saying that Nazis and anti-Nazis are morally equivalent is very bad moral judgment.

      Just because people on both sides are bad does not make them evil. Maybe an extreme example will help you understand the morality of this:

      During slavery days, there were slave uprisings which killed innocent white people. But, this doesn’t make slaves and slave holders morally equal.

      During WWII, a few Jews killed Germans. This does not make Jews morally equivalent to the Nazis!

      Yes, the so-called “antifa” were violence. But this does not make the anti-fascists moral equivalent to Nazis, Klansmen and whtie supremacists.

      But Trump (and you apparently) can’t see a moral difference. You aren’t alone. Lots of Evangelicals refuse to break with Trump. This is an epic moral failure for our wing of Christianity. (I’m an Evangelical Christian.)

    • Az1seeit

      Wait. Donald Trump was anointed? I don’t think I understand what you mean….

    • caskinner

      So Exodus 18:21 is irrelevant to you?

  • Patmos

    “We have learned corporate America has a greater moral compass.”

    Bending like a reed in the wind is now great moral compass? Those corporate “leaders” were reacting to the public’s response, not any sort of moral compass.

    • Patmos

      I should say, a public response inflamed by the media. Does anyone really think these people would have done anything other than follow their public relations advisors?

    • Mensa Member

      >> Bending like a reed in the wind is now great moral compass?

      Better than some Christians who are standing four square behind a president who clearly lacks morals.

  • Patmos

    The left is running around like chickens with their heads cut off, and so are some independents and those on the right, but that’s just because the leftist media has been pushing the chaos narrative hard.

  • Mensa Member

    A request to moderators;

    Somebody here is flagging messages that don’t violate the rules. Please warn that user and tell them that The Stream believes in open discussion. It violates the spirit of free speech to censor a post just because you disagree with it.

    • Myth Buster

      So, much for the protestors last weekend were there for “Free Speech” reasons. Look how childishly and unChristian like their defenders act here.

      • Mensa Member

        I give credit to “The Stream” for it’s commitment to diversity of opinion. Lots of other conservative sites will ban a liberal after just one post.

        Thank you, “The Stream”!

        But whoever is flagging posts needs to be warned and stopped. This is abuse.

        • Myth Buster

          Yes, what little experience I’ve had with the moderators here have been good. I’ve also posted on some extreme right websites that just delete liberal orientated comments, which total misrepresents the feelings and positions people may have on an issue. Only the immature people use the flagging tactic. It means they’ve lost the argument or don’t have the brains to defend their positions.

  • BroFrank

    Given the fact that the media has largely given Antifa a pass on attacks leveled at the conservative and Christian community—should not Christian leaders be concerned that there may be a concerted attempt at manipulating the Christian community?

    Can it be that the media is trying to separate us (Christians) from our modern day Cyrus, as he (clumsily) attempts to contribute some balanced reasoning to an already inflamed populace? I respect Dr. Bernard’s right to distance himself from the President at this time (I am certain that the good Dr. will continue praying for Mr. Trump!)—but cannot others hold the reigns on sobriety?

    For after they have shot down President Trump, will not the media eventually turn its rabid guns on the “rational Christians” who assisted in his assassination?

    • Myth Buster

      You got me there. How has Antifa been given a pass on attacks leveled at the Christian community? Please be specific how have they attacked the Christian community?

  • Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin.

    • Alonzo

      Non sequitur

  • jayceej

    I did not have a bit of trouble understanding President Trump’s remarks on any of the occasions mentioned. Maybe that is because I was not trying to pick out something to complain about.

  • Myth Buster

    Sorry, but it works the other way around. The Media is owned by corporations.

    • Lucas Jackson

      That’s a first. Media owns corporations??????

  • timeout31

    I am becoming increasingly disenchanted by Brown’s “take” on the Charlottesville event….the incident had zero to do with Trump. His remarks were and still are correct, measured, and appropriate. What is also clear is that even those who have strong spiritual convictions, but are part of the media in some matter, continually want to organize, pronounce and dictate the exact words and emphasis on Trump’s words….in plain speak: they want to restrict his speech. Yes, they want to silence his voice. It is easy to follow the chronological order of comments from Trump now…On Saturday morning, no one knew about the death of the woman. Everyone knew there were KKK and Neo Nazis and we all know there were MORE antifa, blm, and all manner of masked “patriots” carrying sticks, bricks, bats, and bottles of urine and even flame throwers. I watched those “masked patriots” attacked the PERMITTED protesters.

    I am not going to read Brown’s articles any longer. He is a political correct author who wants to manipulate reality with his own political correct bias.

    • Lucas Jackson

      Wow! that was a one side loaded comment that doesn’t reflect reality! Trump’s “remarks were and still are correct, measured, and appropriate.” He’s been widely condemned throughout the world for his comments. Where have you been?

      • chichilouise

        You have hard of “the mind of the world”, right? The one we are warned against agreeing with?

      • Jim Walker

        Did you watch CNN? Where have you been?

        • Lucas Jackson

          Not watching at Fox News with you.

    • BTP

      Agreed. Brown is hopeless.

    • chichilouise

      Agreed

  • chichilouise

    Mr Brown, why on earth would you assume Trump meant that there are “very fine Nazis”? Has he been so long in the public eye, and still you do not know him? You have shown a disappointing lack of either discernment or character during these past two years in regards to Trump. You seem to be accepting the lies of the leftists as truth. I do not. Perhaps you are just naive. To be a watchman on the wall you need discernment, character, and the opposite of naïveté. It is you who needs prayer as much as Trump does. You too often seem swayed by the mind of the age and taken in by its tactics. Even my unsaved younger sister sees through this media spit storm against Trump.

  • Jim Walker

    Dr Brown, either you are with President Trump or you are not. Pick a side and work on strengthening that instead of writing flip flopping articles sitting on a fence.

Inspiration
God Knows Best, Even When He Foils Your Plans
Liberty McArtor
More from The Stream
Connect with Us