Richard Gilmore: The Man Who Was There

What Edward Hermann's character on Gilmore Girls can teach us about the best men in life.

By Published on February 15, 2015

Herrmann, who converted to Catholicism later in life, had once embraced a lifestyle that wasn’t so different from Lorelai Gilmore’s frenetic one. And he had learned a few things from it.

“In the ’60s and ’70s, when sex was free and there was no disease, we thought it was great,” he said in an interview. “We could sleep with anyone, and we did. It’s a lie. The fact that we did it didn’t make it true. It’s not enlightening and helpful. We didn’t look for connections, for relationships.”

He then added, “It was a bogus rainbow hair life,” which sounded exactly like something Richard Gilmore would say.

Richard may have been befuddled and sometimes even angered by a daughter he found incomprehensible, but at the end of the day he would still, in his own way, be on her side. Herrmann’s understanding of the need for real connections seems to have informed his work on Gilmore Girls. As frustrating as her relationship with her father could be, Lorelai couldn’t put him out of her life as she could with a love interest. That relationship was always there, needing work, patience, and effort . . . and when she failed to put those things into it, it was still there. As played subtly and beautifully by Herrmann, Richard may have been befuddled and sometimes even angered by a daughter he found incomprehensible, but at the end of the day he would still, in his own way, be on her side.

Read the article “Richard Gilmore: The Man Who Was There” on christandpopculture.com.

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