The Myth That Climate Change Created Harvey, Irma 

By Published on September 11, 2017

Flooding in homes and businesses across Houston was still on the rise when Politico ran a provocative article, titled “Harvey Is What Climate Change Looks Like.” 

Politico was not alone, as another news outlet called the one-two punch of Harvey and Irma the potential “new normal.” Brad Johnson, executive director of the advocacy group Climate Hawks Vote, says Harvey and Irma are reason to finally jail officials who “reject science.” 

Rather than focus on the victims and offer solutions for speedy recovery, pundits and politicians in the wake of Harvey focused on saying, “I told you so.” 

Except they’re not telling the full story. 

Consider this data from a 2012 article in the Journal of Climate, authored by scientists Roger Pielke Jr. and Jessica Weinkle. Pielke tweeted a graph from the paper that shows no trends in global tropical cyclone landfalls over the past 46 years. 

Statistician and Danish author Bjorn Lomborg also tweeted a graph showing major hurricanes making landfall in the U.S. trending downward for well over a century. 

Before anyone starts claiming that Pielke and Lomborg’s charts rely on denier data, other scientists published similar findings. 

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reported in its most recent scientific assessment that “[n]o robust trends in annual numbers of tropical storms, hurricanes, and major hurricanes … have been identified over the past 100 years in the North Atlantic basin,” and that there are “no significant observed trends in global tropical cyclone frequency.” 

Further, “confidence in large-scale changes in the intensity of extreme extratropical cyclones [such as ‘Superstorm’ Sandy] since 1900 is low.” 

Other media outlets tying Harvey to climate change took a more measured approach. 

For instance, Vox wrote that man-made global warming did not actually cause Harvey, but simply exacerbated the natural disaster by creating heavier rainfalls. 

But this claim is discredited by University of Washington climatologist Cliff Mass, who after examining precipitation levels in the Gulf found that “[t]here is no evidence that global warming is influencing Texas coastal precipitation in the long term and little evidence that warmer than normal temperatures had any real impact on the precipitation intensity from this storm.” 

Mass went on to explicitly refute those who attribute Hurricane Harvey to climate change: 

The bottom line in this analysis is that both observations of the past decades and models looking forward to the future do not suggest that one can explain the heavy rains of Harvey by global warming, and folks that are suggesting it are poorly informing the public and decision makers. 

Politicians seeking to exploit Harvey and Irma as reasons to act on climate change would only make a bad situation worse. Climate policies and regulations designed to prevent natural disasters and slow the earth’s warming simply will not do so. 

Such policies aim to limit access to affordable, reliable conventional energy sources that power 80 percent of the country. Restricting their use through regulations or taxes will drive energy prices through the roof and make unemployment lines longer. 

Further, these policies will destroy economic wealth, meaning fewer resources would be available to strengthen infrastructure to contain the future effects of natural disasters and to afterward. 

Instead of blaming man-made greenhouse gas emissions, climate catastrophists should see natural disasters for what they really are: natural. 

If policymakers want to take a page out of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s “never let a crisis go to waste” playbook, they should worry less about costly nonsolutions to climate change and focus on natural disaster response, resilience, and preparedness. 

 

Copyright 2017 The Daily Signal

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  • Laura Ann Register

    Climate control had nothing to do with both hurricane’s. Whether you believe the Word of God or not, it is the sins of this world that has caused and is causing all of the horrible things that are going n. The hurricane’s the fires, the earth quakes. As it says in the book of Revelations,”That in the last days, the earth will begin to have labor pains as a sign that the Son of Man need to wake up and take our place in this world.” I know that there are those who think I may be nuts for stating this, but in all actuality, it’s the truth and the truth is more real than the facts. God is trying to tell us something, and what He is trying to tell us is that we need to get our house in order, we need to get our lives right with Him, because things are not going to get any better, they will actually only start to get worse until the Day of His return, the Day that Christ returns for His Bride and His Bride is the the Church or more the whole Body of Christ. I just pray that those who really want to be safe during these times, will wake up and see that they would rather be protected and kept safe instead of just shrugging it off and going about your daily lives, then when something bad happens to you, you end up blaming God. It’s Not His Fault!! Do not go and blame God for all of this mess, He did not do it. Yeah, He may have allowed it because people have or are kicking Him out of this Nation and then they stand and wonder why God let this happen. You can’t go and kick Him out of this Nation, our schools, court houses, the Government and then expect Him to stop or help when you didn’t want a thing to do with Him in the first place. He is a patient, Loving, caring God, but He will only tolerate so much. Just like He did in the days of Noah, so is He doing now, so wake up!!!

  • Myth Buster

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth….

    • Paul

      “Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history.”

      Exactly how long is that recorded history?

      • Myth Buster

        That’s a good question. I believe a systematic tracking of the weather started in 1895. Prior to that the weather information is spotty. However, the science related to Global Warming isn’t just based upon 120 plus years of weather data. It just supports the avalanche of scientific data that supports the Global Warming Theory.

        • Paul

          I have to give you credit for being honest about the lack of historic accurate instrument measured data regarding temperatures. At best we’ve got about 100-150 years worth of measured data that is accurate. Before then the tools were not nearly accurate enough to accout for the minor changes that global warming alarmists are putting forth. Estimates before then are exactly that…estimates. And even with the current data there are estimates regarding the impacts of development and urbanization on the measurements. From an evolutionists perspective our data is so small relative to earth history.

          • Dragon Slayer

            But, Global warming isn’t based upon 120-years worth of weather tracking. It’s based upon other current data and other things that can be measured going back thousands of years. Like air samples taken from ice in the north pole that can be tested to see its quality and chemistry composition.

          • Phil Steinacker

            Yeah… current “data” which has been doctored with phony, politically motivated, self-serving “adjustments” to arrive at the pre-determined conclusions justifying government control over everyday decisions belonging to citizens and not to the progressive ruling class.

          • Dragon Slayer

            The evidence for global warming due to human influence has been recognized by the national science academies of all the major industrialized countries. Not one major country dissents on this issue. No scientific body of national or international standing maintains a formal opinion dissenting from the summary conclusions of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. That would be one major conspiracy theory to believe in for this to be a major worldwide collusion, wouldn’t it? What would be the gain for other countries to go along with this conspiracy???? Where is the payoff for them? You do realize this goes way beyond the US, right? Russia also supports the Global Warming Theory. They’re not a democracy and would have zero problems “justifying government control over everyday decisions belonging to citizens and not to the progressive ruling class.”

          • James

            The difference between Russia and the United States is that the Russian government will use global warming to extract bribes, punish opposition, and reward government supporters, while any law to prevent it will be vigorously enforced in the United States.

            Russia will continue to pollute as much as ever, while Americans will risk federal prison for passing gas.

          • Myth Buster

            It goes way beyond Russia. That’s one major secret conspiracy that involves thousands of scientists in all the industrialized countries throughout the world to be on the same sheet of Global Warming music and far less then 2% are objecting?

          • James

            Global warming is real, but I doubt that anything will be done about it. Americans tend to mistake a public commitment for actual action.

          • Myth Buster

            I happen to agree with you there. In terms of Global Warming I’m a pessimist. There isn’t going to be too much done to stop it until it’s too late and then people who claimed it was fake will be screaming why something wasn’t done sooner. It’s now hard to find people who admit being in support of the 2003 invasion of Iraq or Free Trade.

          • Paul

            The payoff? Consider that the UN admitted that climate policy is actually about global wealth distribution, just about every country but the US has something to gain.

          • Myth Buster

            Oh sure, the UN had a meeting and this was discussed on the general assembly floor and all the other western industrial nations of the world just willingly voted to cooperate with this massive worldwide secret conspiracy and the entire scientific community throughout the world also went along with it to shift wealth to other non-developed countries too. Yes, I believe that one. It makes perfect sense to me. Germany, Japan, China who has a booming industrialized economy are just going along with this one.

          • Paul

            As I said already, anything before about 100-150 years ago is based on estimates. There’s lots of ways estimates are made, they all have their margins of error and assumptions made about the unkown.

            As someone who thoroughly enjoys and values science and discovery, I can’t help but see the agendas at work on this issue from the political realm on all sides, whether it’s Exxon or Al Gore.

            Earlier you commented that this is like the history of tobacco and cancer. For me I see it through the lens of the now dead peak oil hysteria. It wasn’t long ago that scientists and politicians were sounding the alarm that we’re running out of oil and we must shift away from petroleum towards ‘renewable’ energy to avoid societal colapse when we run out of oil. Oops. Well, turns out we’re good for many more centuries and the crisis was false. Now the same folks have rekindled their anti-fossile fuel agenda under the banner of climate change. The message is ‘well, turns out we’re not actually running out of fossile fuels anytime soon but here’s a entirely new reason to completely alter society to accomodate our new fears….just trust us, we know what’s right and good for you because we’re the scientists and you’re not, how dare you criticize our past failures!’ Similarly and ironically, when I was a kid I remember some scientists raising alarms over the pending ice age…what happened there?

            As I said, I value science, but the god complex at work there among the prognosticators often spoils it for me. It happens in medicine at an alarming rate. Eggs are bad, no they’re good. Same with just about every food group not to mention drugs. Opinions shift with the latest round of studies, and what was truth before no longer is, which means it wasn’t truth in the first place. Facts and truth are not the same thing, but we’re often expected to believe they are when the truth is all the facts are not in.

          • Lucas Jackson

            Air samples extracted from ice that’s 100,000 years old or from the current atmosphere that is analyzed is not is not based upon “assumptions”. Sorry, but it’s not that simple and far more complex. Also, one can say that it wasn’t long ago that people worshiped a huge plethora of pagan gods before Christianity came along and society started believing in Jesus and Mohamed. Oops. Just because one scientific theory has gone by the wayside, doesn’t mean they are all invalid. It’s not that simple. If you truly understand science, value it, live in the 21st Century and understand how hypothesis and theories are developed and tested, then go through re-testing and peer-review – you would understand there really isn’t a conspiratorial “god complex at work” that all scientists throughout the industrialized world (or more then 98% studying it) are in secret joint collusion with each other (oxymoronic to the idea of a God complex) to maintain a false theory. You know this exact same argument was launched a little over a half century ago by the cigarette companies and people believed that one too.

          • Paul

            Then you should be able to tell us, what exactly was the global temperature in year 98,000 BC?

          • Myth Buster

            Scientists can. They have been studying this for decades now. You should look it up.

        • Dragon Slayer

          Excellent point! To be ignorant of Global Warming is like refusing to believe the scientists warning that cigarettes caused cancer back in the 1960s. The tobacco companies also hired scientists to claim there was no proof of that too and people believed it, as they continued purchasing their packs of cigarettes. They’re now dead. Most of them passed away to lung cancer, but the cigarette companies made their profits.

          • Ryan

            The information gathered by, “warmers,” is and has been collected from large cities with huge amounts of concrete, asphalt and steel involved in building those places where the instruments are put for information. The numbers, even though it was known they would be slightly higher, were still enhanced to show warmer temperatures.
            I live in the desert southwest, in the desert, and have been laughing at the warmers because they are reporting that it is hotter than ever. The mountains around us have had glacial ice in the past. It was melted in 1983 and as of the last few years has made a comeback. Our temperatures have been at normal and have over the last couple years been below normal.
            One would think that those of us who live in the deserts would be the first to notice the warmer temperatures. Maybe that is because we don’t have warmer mindsets.
            But, there is a time when the temperature on the planet will be caused by the inhabitants, and only those inhabitants will suffer the consequences of the short term global warming. It will include a third of the green plants burned up, plants used for food, the water will be soured and unfit to drink. Some of the water will even be turned to blood, I guess if you are thirsty enough…
            Warmers will say and do anything that will bring control of nations purse strings and with enough power they could even lay hold on global power over all peoples. Which seems to be the main goal of the warmers. There’s always those who want to be the first to control the earths populations. The warmers are just trying to crowd into the front of the line. Nothing new.

          • Dragon Slayer

            Information collected in the North Pole that has been frozen in the ice for 100,000s years is not taken from large cities with huge amounts of concrete, asphalt and steel involved in building those places where the instruments are put for information. I have no idea where you got that one from. You may also live in the desert southwest and have seen these weather patterns, but it’s called “Global Warming”. The emphasis is on the word “global” – meaning analysis of weather changes throughout the world. The poles have lost about 35% of their ice over the last few decades and its continuing to shrink; polar bears are now endangered; plus water levels are rising throughout the world; it’s getting hotter; coral reefs that have been around for thousands of years are dying now at fast rates just within the last few years; deceases are spreading northward due to the warming; droughts are expanding and it’s now looking like tornadoes are much more sever. so, it’s not about the weather you’ve observed in the desert southwest. There’s a lot new if you choose to look.

          • Ryan

            Mars icecap is shrinking as well. Global warming on this planet must be spreading to the neighbors, doncha think?
            Diseases spreading north are in fact being brought by illegal aliens.
            Droughts, specially in California is due to no water storage that would bring the humidity needed in mountains to keep the fire dangers down.
            Environmentalists are the culprits in bringing many of the harmful effects of their ideology to the planet.
            Besides, what are you worried about, the prophecies of global warming prophets have all come to pass, there is no longer life on planet earth.

          • Myth Buster

            Great linking on non-related claim like Mars icecap is shrinking as well. We’re talking about Global Warming on Planet Earth. Yes, whereas ice ages on Earth involve polar ice caps growing in size, prior work suggested that Martian ice ages would involve shrinking polar ice caps. This involves the study of how these things develop naturally, not as a result of Global Warming cased by the use of fossil fuels. There is a difference and science is very clear on his this works.

          • Sean Purcell

            After reading your comment I did a google search and found several articles indicating projected increases in the frequency, intensity and duration of heatwaves in the desert of the southwestern United States are putting people on edges. They spoke of desert plant life and animals that would have difficulty surviving in temps that get too hot. It’s coming you way soon.

          • Ryan

            Google is a leftist entity that is well known for spreading fake news.

          • Myth Buster

            Google is a leftist entity? What? It seems like scientists, historians, geologists, doctors, politifact, the main stream media, every other western industrialized country on the face of the Earth are leftists. This seems to be how some deal with FACTS they don’t like looking at. But, Google doesn’t write the scientific articles that are presented on their website in addition to article like this one that have been published in “The Stream”. Good try….

    • James

      So how do we avoid man-made global climate change without losing the considerable economic benefits of cheap energy?

      • Myth Buster

        Not an easy question to answer. But, the problem goes way beyond “losing the considerable economic benefits of cheap energy”. Let me turn the statement around and put it another way. First, solar and wind energy is far cheaper than fossil fuels. Recently, several European governments have stopped paying subsidies for people installing solar panels. It’s cost efficient and is not in need of it now. Germany is big into this form of energy and they have a booming economy. Secondly, just because gas prices are down now doesn’t mean it will be that way next year. Lastly, the negative costs of not addressing Global Warming and with it the economic/physical damage it shall inflict over the next decades, just so a handful of people can make a lot of money now, is mind boggling.

        • James

          Can solar and wind fill energy needs on a still night?

          • Myth Buster

            No, but power can be saved that can fill that void later at night. We are also not also talking in total black and white absolutes. Just because one switches over to mostly solar and wind doesn’t mean there would be absolutely no fossil fuel energy.

    • Sean Purcell

      The science is not hard to grasp and neither are the consequences.

      • Myth Buster

        Yes, it is….

  • Paul

    If policymakers want to take a page out of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s “never let a crisis go to waste” playbook, they should worry less about costly nonsolutions to climate change and focus on natural disaster response, resilience, and preparedness.

    Such people aren’t concerned with practicality, they have different goals in mind that they are working towards. Brad Johnsons comments exemplifies the actual degree to which they are willing to silence their detractors. They are completely comfortable jailing political prisoners to reach their goals. I don’t know Brad, he may be just a tool, but the ultimate goal is global govt and destroying the national sovereignty of the USA. ‘World Peace’ proved an insufficient rallying cry so now it’s global warming which morphed to climate change.Thank you Mr Trump for yanking us from the Paris Climate Accord and valuing our national sovereignty.

  • tether

    I hate to disappoint anyone, but as long as the earth remains there will be a time to plant, a time to harvest, cool and warm, days and nights. I know this to be true because God, the Father of my Lord and Savior Jesus, the Christ, tells us so in His Word.

  • Linda

    Ya okay. What we see with our eyes, hear with our ears, and recall with our minds is a myth.

  • BetterYet

    Ahhhh. The voice of reason, crying out in the wilderness. Good on you.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth….

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth….

  • Myth Buster

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth….

  • Myth Buster

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

  • Myth Buster

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth..

  • Myth Buster

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    • ncsugrant

      So, since there is a “theory” backing the claim, it must be true?
      Sorry friend, the burden of proof is for those making a claim to PROVE it. You don’t get to make a claim, and insist that I disprove it or accept it as truth. Nice try.
      By the way, your first two sentences are just plain nonsense (and utterly un-provable).
      Where is the official repository of the names of “the scientists studying ‘Global Warming'”?
      There must certainly be such a list, else you would not know what number to divide by to come up with the contrived 98% figure.
      Bonus question: Of the “scientists” who do assert that the climate is warming, and further assert that the alleged warming is caused by human activity, how many are paid by government funds which are dependent on the finding that there is indeed warming caused by human activity?
      Lastly, since hurricane activity has been significantly LOWER over the past 12 years, is that also attributed to “Global Warming”?
      Just curious.

      • Myth Buster

        They have. Don’t you understand what an hypothesis is? Do you understand one first has to have an hypothesis that can be proven before it becomes a scientific theory. Scientific Theories have to be peer reviewed. You did learn this in high school at some point, right?

        In terms of the 98% this has been reported upon in numerous articles on the subject. I’d look it up if i were you. Yes, hurricane activity has been significantly LOWER over the past 12 years, but it has been far more intense and 13 of the last 14 recorded years have been the hottest in recorded history.

    • mr. producer

      so how do you account for the falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes over the last 140 years?

      • Myth Buster

        I see you’re an avid reader of the Climate Depot, a non-science website of Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow by Marc Morano (a Republican political aide, not a scientist and a conservative global warming denier, that has made this unrelated assertion that proves nothing. This is the only website asserting this claim. The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    .For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    .For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

    • SaneSage

      Do you have a job?

      • Myth Buster

        Yes, I also have a life that goes beyond deleting other people’s comments. Do you go from site to site all day long deleting other people’s comments?

        It just takes me a few minutes to repost all of these. It takes him five times as long to flag delete all of them. I’m just trying to figure out how long it take him to figure it out.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    .For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth…

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth…

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    .For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth…

  • Myth Buster

    .For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth…

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    .For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth…

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth…

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth…

  • Myth Buster

    .For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth…

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth..

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth…

  • Myth Buster

    For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    .For some reason my comment along with everyone else went into the pending. I’ll just re-post this one again – one time to start off.

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

  • Myth Buster

    Here’s another 75. Enjoy! It just took me three minutes to re-post all of them. Think about that when you’re repetitively flagging to delete them. Stupid is as stupid does. I’ll do 125 next time. LOL!!!!!!!

  • Myth Buster

    We’ll be patriotic. Just 76 here. LOL!!!!!!!

  • Myth Buster

    Yes, I also have a life that goes beyond deleting other people’s comments. Do you go from site to site all day long deleting other people’s comments?

    It just takes me a few minutes to repost all of these. It takes him five times as long to flag delete all of them. I’m just trying to figure out how long it take him to figure it out.

  • Myth Buster

    The science on is subject is starting to be very clear. Over 98% of scientists studying Global Warming believe it is man made. The other 2% have not reached a conclusion or are employed by the fossil fuel companies. Thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history. The latest science connecting hurricanes and global warming suggests more is yet to come. Tropical storms are likely to bring: higher wind speeds; more precipitation; and bigger storm surge in the coming decades. Although climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain—but possible—outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. If we just look at frequency, there’s really no theory that says we should see fewer or more storms. But if we look at intensity separately, there is theory that says they should get stronger—especially the strongest ones. And we do see some evidence for that in the data. Some myth.

    The issue is about Global Warming and the scientific projected negative effects it has on society and nature throughout the world now. As a result of Global warming hurricanes are overall more intense with more destructive capabilities (as predicted), thirteen of the last fourteen years have been the hottest in recorded global history, deceases are creeping northward, coral reefs 10,000s of years old are dying off in record numbers that will have a negative effect on fish life populations, 30% of the poles have now melted within the decade and continuing to melt, water levels along the costs rising, Caribbean is heating up, polar bears are endangered and droughts are expanding effecting food supplies. Just because several cities in the world experience colder weather or there is a reported falling intensity level of landfall hurricanes (only found that one on one website, but will just assume it’s true) doesn’t mean this refutes the Theory of Global Warming. It’s about the OVERALL GLOBAL weather effects on the Earth.

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